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sociétés par intérêts

English translation: you may have to leave it out

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05:15 Jun 17, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Business/Commerce (general)
French term or phrase: sociétés par intérêts
Les sociétés de personnes, dites parfois encore « sociétés par intérêts », sont toutes celles dont les associés s’unissent en considération de leur personnalité, parce qu’ils se font mutuellement confiance.
Neil Rear
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:32
English translation:you may have to leave it out
Explanation:
Otherwise, it seems to me, you may end up with "partnerships, sometimes still called partnerships". Unless your text actually differentiates between the two, somehow? (In which case, perhaps a paraphrase such as "old-style partnerships" might be necessary).

Sometimes I find this, particularly in IT texts (OK, so I know it's not the same), where you get "<French term> also called <English term for same thing>". You just have to leave it out. Sometimes French has 2 terms where we only have one, and you just have to get round it....
Selected response from:

Charlie Bavington
Local time: 13:32
Grading comment
You are right, Charlie - the text does not differentiate. It really only makes sense to include the term in French. Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +3partnershipLindsay Sabadosa
3you may have to leave it outCharlie Bavington
3"company in kind"Christopher RH


  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
sociétés par intérêts
partnership


Explanation:
This first website (Canandia, bilingual) indicates that "sociétés par intérêts" is just another way of saying "partnership." The site below (FR only) explains the different legal statuses a company may have and explains (much like your text) that sociétés par intérêts is the same thing as a société de personne.


    Reference: http://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/201/301/trade_marks_jrn-ef/2000...
    Reference: http://www.ecodroit.editions-foucher.fr/upload/03687_006_p_0...
Lindsay Sabadosa
United States
Local time: 08:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AbdulHameed Al Hadidi
2 hrs
  -> Thank you!

agree  Peter Freckleton
2 hrs
  -> Thank you!

agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz
9 hrs
  -> Thank you, Jane!
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
sociétés par intérêts
"company in kind"


Explanation:
I think you need to leave the French.

However, you could (teleologically) interpret "par intérêts" as being a variation on the "société en participation", where the "participation" corresponds to each partner's contribution in kind of their work, rather than their capital.

So, by extension, the "interest" here is actually an interest deriving from their contribition in kind...

So how about "company in kind"?

Christopher RH
Local time: 14:32
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
sociétés par intérêts
you may have to leave it out


Explanation:
Otherwise, it seems to me, you may end up with "partnerships, sometimes still called partnerships". Unless your text actually differentiates between the two, somehow? (In which case, perhaps a paraphrase such as "old-style partnerships" might be necessary).

Sometimes I find this, particularly in IT texts (OK, so I know it's not the same), where you get "<French term> also called <English term for same thing>". You just have to leave it out. Sometimes French has 2 terms where we only have one, and you just have to get round it....

Charlie Bavington
Local time: 13:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 227
Grading comment
You are right, Charlie - the text does not differentiate. It really only makes sense to include the term in French. Thanks!
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