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telle que

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22:44 Apr 3, 2007
This question was closed without grading. Reason: No acceptable answer

French to English translations [PRO]
Science - Chemistry; Chem Sci/Eng / analytical procedure
French term or phrase: telle que
Repeatedly, the procedure refers to the "résine telle que". This phrase is not followed by any qualifer.

Does this simply refer to the resin "in question" (i.e., the kind of resin being used in the procedure)? Or does it mean the resin in its current form (i.e. "as is").
Eric Bullington
Local time: 06:08
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Summary of answers provided
4 +5in its current state (as is)MatthewLaSon
4 +2as it stands
chaplin


Discussion entries: 12





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
as it stands


Explanation:
there could be other versions

chaplin
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:08
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Richard Benham: Yeah, this sort of thing. As I wrote above, "tel que" for "tel quel" (i.e. without complement) is condemned by grammarians. Ialways found it jarring as a non-native....
3 hrs

agree  rousselures: It is very bad grammar...
5 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
telle quelle
in its current state (as is)


Explanation:
Hello,

If you say in French "La peinture, laisse-la telle quelle", I'm informally telling someone to the leave the painting as it is (make no changes to it which could include not moving it, but to know for sure complete context would be needed).

In the scientific context, it would most likely mean "leave in its current state."

It should read: telle quelle

I hope this helps.

MatthewLaSon
Local time: 06:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: I appreciate your input. I am aware of what "telle quelle" means in colloquial French. It's the scientific meaning of "telle que" after a resin that I'm interested in. This is the second unrelated translation in which I've found this term modifying an ion exhange resin. But you may be on to something when you say "state". It may be referring to the oxidation state.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Diane de Cicco: the closest in English is indeed "as is" but the French is pretty sloppy here... for a patent
50 mins
  -> Thanks, Diane!

agree  Lidija Lazic
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Lidija!

agree  narasimha
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Narasimha!

agree  gad
3 days22 hrs
  -> Thanks, gad!

agree  Evi Prokopi
5 days
  -> Thanks, Evi!
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