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tétrapode

English translation: tetrapod pier

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:tétrapode
English translation:tetrapod pier
Entered by: David Sirett
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11:41 Oct 27, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Construction / Civil Engineering / article for magazine - literary
French term or phrase: tétrapode
• Une forme identifiable caractérisée par des piles en “V” ainsi qu’une perception linéaire, fine et élancée de l’ouvrage mise en valeur la nuit par un éclairage au cœur des tétrapodes

this is talking about a viaduct and how it blends into the landscape.

I know, in case you might be tempted to tell me, that the word "tetrapod" exists in English and means something with four feet. However, I wonder if anyone has a clever way of conveying that in "real" English. I'm still thinking....
xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 07:37
tetrapod pile
Explanation:
Is "Architectural Review" English enough? "The structure spans between distinctive tetrapod piles that were designed--in collaboration with engineer Jean Muller International--to cope with the significant structural implications of the passing trains that will travel at speeds of up to 220mph." (Not sure I like "spans between" myself...)

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Note added at 24 mins (2006-10-27 12:06:18 GMT)
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Note that "four-footed" is not appropriate, if this does concern the S********e viaduct, as the tetrapods are inverted.

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Note added at 26 mins (2006-10-27 12:07:43 GMT)
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Also http://www.cg90.fr/pages/3/92/231/1037.htm

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Note added at 1 hr (2006-10-27 13:06:09 GMT)
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The more I think about it, the more I feel the text I quoted must be a poor translation or written in English by a French person (pile = pile?!)
If you want to keep it nontechnical: "between the four struts of each pier"?

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Note added at 2 hrs (2006-10-27 14:19:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, I was talking about the English text I quoted, not the author of your French text--and I know "piles" is right... in the French.
Selected response from:

David Sirett
Local time: 07:37
Grading comment
I'm still not sure what the best way of handling this wold be but I agree with Bourth that to an English reader tetrapods would be stranger than its equivalent is to the French
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5quadruped (four-footed)
Elena Petelos
3 +1tetrapod pileDavid Sirett
3tetrapodDolores Vázquez


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
tetrapod


Explanation:
An option.


    Reference: http://ec.europa.eu/eurodicautom/Controller
Dolores Vázquez
Native speaker of: Native in GalicianGalician, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 29
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
quadruped (four-footed)


Explanation:
Latin etymology in Eng., whereas tetrapod, Gr. etymology.
Alternatively four-footed etc.
Quadrupedalism, etc.

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&rls=GEUA,GEUA:2005-51,G...


Definitions of quadruped on the Web:

A creature that walks on four legs
www.alphalink.com.au/~dannj/gloss.htm

An animal that walks on all fours.
digsfossils.com/fossils/footprints_glossary.html

An animal with four feet.
www.nps.gov/maca/learnhome/cur_p_glo.htm

Walking on four limbs.
www.humboldt.edu/~cmc43/glossary.htm

On "all fours"; prone (front) on elbows/knees or hands/feet.
www.childrenwithchallenges.net/definitions/Q.html

an animal especially a mammal having four limbs specialized for walking
quadrupedal: having four feet
wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn

A quadruped is an animal having exactly four walking legs.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quadruped




http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&rls=GEUA,GEUA:2005-51,G...

Elena Petelos
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:37
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 5
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
tetrapod pile


Explanation:
Is "Architectural Review" English enough? "The structure spans between distinctive tetrapod piles that were designed--in collaboration with engineer Jean Muller International--to cope with the significant structural implications of the passing trains that will travel at speeds of up to 220mph." (Not sure I like "spans between" myself...)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 24 mins (2006-10-27 12:06:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note that "four-footed" is not appropriate, if this does concern the S********e viaduct, as the tetrapods are inverted.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 mins (2006-10-27 12:07:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also http://www.cg90.fr/pages/3/92/231/1037.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2006-10-27 13:06:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The more I think about it, the more I feel the text I quoted must be a poor translation or written in English by a French person (pile = pile?!)
If you want to keep it nontechnical: "between the four struts of each pier"?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2006-10-27 14:19:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, I was talking about the English text I quoted, not the author of your French text--and I know "piles" is right... in the French.


    Reference: http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3575/is_1298_217/...
David Sirett
Local time: 07:37
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 64
Grading comment
I'm still not sure what the best way of handling this wold be but I agree with Bourth that to an English reader tetrapods would be stranger than its equivalent is to the French
Notes to answerer
Asker: well of course that is precisely what it does concern, so I know they are inverted (upside down "V" shape). My problem is that it is a very technical term in an otherwise very general text

Asker: As it happens I am not actually translating this - just wanted to know for my own later use. However, I can assure you that the author is French and that "piles" is OK


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: Personally I'd avoid "tetrapod" which is a civ. eng. element in its own right (though of course the same can be said of the French, tho' the French will tend to call those "Accropodes", after their own invention. "Upside-down-Eiffel-tower-base piers"??
5 hrs
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