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partie courante d'une paroi

English translation: skip it if you can

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13:45 Apr 10, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Construction / Civil Engineering
French term or phrase: partie courante d'une paroi
La partie courante d'une paroi est la partie constituée d'une ou de plusieurs couches superposées, thermiquement homogènes.
laurentl
Local time: 06:59
English translation:skip it if you can
Explanation:
Equivalent English definitions relating to thermal transmittance do not make an issue of what is and what is not a "courant" ("standard") part of a wall or roof, etc. If no special features are mentioned, it is assumed that special features are precisely that - special, and not covered by the general calculation rules. But the French are Cartesian AND used to Napoleonic codes in which anything that is not expressly allowed is disallowed, so they go into excruciating detail ...

It seems to be too that they are not comfortable with the term themselves, for the definition falls short of what it really means. The most important point of that definition is "thermiquement homogène". The business about "couches" is strictly irrelevant. What they mean is that if you have a roof made of slates, say, with a given type of insulation and underfelt, with roof windows in it, the "courant" part refers to the roof, not the windows, at least to the extent that the roof components are identical throughout. Similarly, if you have a double-glazed atrium, say, comprising panels of insulated opaque materials, then the "courant" part is the double glazing (or not, depending on which is used in the greater proportion).

If all else fails, "the standard (or routine) part of the floor/roof".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-04-10 15:00:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note that while "paroi" generally IS a wall, when discussing insulation in particular it can also refer to floors and, especially, roofs. Just as a shoebox has 6 "parois", so does a building, as a rule (especially when on stilts or standing over some other vacant or otherwise uninsulated space).
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 06:59
Grading comment
many thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +2the intermediate sections of the inner wallAlexei Emam
4skip it if you canxxxBourth


  

Answers


52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
the intermediate sections of the inner wall


Explanation:
See link to previous kudoz question


    Reference: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/263144
    Reference: http://www.wordreference.com/fren/paroi
Alexei Emam
Local time: 05:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lorenia de la Vega
10 mins

agree  Evi Prokopi
38 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

51 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
skip it if you can


Explanation:
Equivalent English definitions relating to thermal transmittance do not make an issue of what is and what is not a "courant" ("standard") part of a wall or roof, etc. If no special features are mentioned, it is assumed that special features are precisely that - special, and not covered by the general calculation rules. But the French are Cartesian AND used to Napoleonic codes in which anything that is not expressly allowed is disallowed, so they go into excruciating detail ...

It seems to be too that they are not comfortable with the term themselves, for the definition falls short of what it really means. The most important point of that definition is "thermiquement homogène". The business about "couches" is strictly irrelevant. What they mean is that if you have a roof made of slates, say, with a given type of insulation and underfelt, with roof windows in it, the "courant" part refers to the roof, not the windows, at least to the extent that the roof components are identical throughout. Similarly, if you have a double-glazed atrium, say, comprising panels of insulated opaque materials, then the "courant" part is the double glazing (or not, depending on which is used in the greater proportion).

If all else fails, "the standard (or routine) part of the floor/roof".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-04-10 15:00:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note that while "paroi" generally IS a wall, when discussing insulation in particular it can also refer to floors and, especially, roofs. Just as a shoebox has 6 "parois", so does a building, as a rule (especially when on stilts or standing over some other vacant or otherwise uninsulated space).

xxxBourth
Local time: 06:59
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4135
Grading comment
many thanks
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