KudoZ home » French to English » Construction / Civil Engineering

5 mm à la règle de 2 m

English translation: ± 5 mm in 2 m

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
23:06 Sep 23, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Construction / Civil Engineering
French term or phrase: 5 mm à la règle de 2 m
This is about tolerances to do with concrete and formwork:

Planéité horizontale et verticale: ± 5 mm à la règle de 2 m
jethro
English translation:± 5 mm in 2 m
Explanation:
This has actually come up before, and should be in the glossary.

It means just what it says: a tolerance of ± 5 mm over any given span of 2 m.

The involvement (or not!) of a 2 m rule in the measurement process isn't usually specified in EN.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 18:09
Grading comment
Thanks a lot
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +1± 5 mm in 2 m
Tony M
4 +15 mm under a 2 m straightedgexxxBourth
2 +1an error of +- 5mm for 2m
Mohamed Mehenoun


  

Answers


7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
± 5 mm in 2 m


Explanation:
This has actually come up before, and should be in the glossary.

It means just what it says: a tolerance of ± 5 mm over any given span of 2 m.

The involvement (or not!) of a 2 m rule in the measurement process isn't usually specified in EN.

Tony M
France
Local time: 18:09
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1147
Grading comment
Thanks a lot

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: Or more literally as below (despite your comment!) //Bourth rules, OK! ;-)
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Alex! I bow to your superior experience...
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
an error of +- 5mm for 2m


Explanation:
a guess...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 mins (2007-09-23 23:26:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

an error of +- 5mm for 2m ruler...I forgot the "ruler" :p sorry ...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2007-09-24 06:54:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

well as my pal Tony said may be error is too strong so we can use "precision" or "accuracy" instead of that ...

here are some refs:

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2007-09-24 06:56:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.regentsprep.org/Regents/math/error/LError.htm

Error in measurement may be represented by a tolerance interval. To determine the tolerance interval in a measurement, add and subtract one-half of the precision of the measuring instrument to the measurement.
For example, if a measurement made with a metric ruler is 5.6 cm and the ruler has a precision of 0.1 cm, then the tolerance interval in this measurement is
5.6 0.05 cm,
or from 5.55 cm to 5.65 cm.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2007-09-24 06:57:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

we speak about tolerance interval if we use the expression : 2+-0.005m

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2007-09-24 06:58:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Precision and Accuracy (30 minutes)

In This Part: Measuring With Precision | Accuracy vs. Precision

We have learned that physical measurement involves error and that every physical measurement is an approximation. This leads us to a new question: How much error is involved in any given measurement? The terms precision and accuracy relate to how good an approximation is. For example, how precise were our measurements of the sides of the right triangles, and how accurate were our measurements of the distance from Mars to the Sun?

Since measurements are approximate, the most meaningful way of interpreting a measurement is as an interval with a lower bound and an upper bound. Imagine that we have measured a line segment, using a ruler divided into centimeters, and found the length to be 5 cm. To be more precise, we can state the measure as an interval -- either in words, 5 cm to the nearest 0.5 cm, or using notation, such as 5 cm 0.5 cm (read "5 cm plus or minus 0.5 cm"). Either presentation gives the center of the interval and the distance of the upper and lower bounds from this center (5 0.5 implies a lower bound of 4.5 and an upper bound of 5.5). We can also state that the maximum possible error for this measure is 0.5 cm (which is half the size of the measurement unit). Note 12

In summary, the precision of a measurement depends on the size of the smallest measuring unit -- whether the measurement is, for example, to the nearest 10 feet, to the nearest foot, or to the nearest tenth of a foot. The smaller the interval, the more we have "narrowed it down," and thus the more precise the measurement.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2007-09-24 06:58:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

from: http://www.learner.org/channel/courses/learningmath/measurem...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2007-09-24 06:58:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

and on ol' google: http://www.google.fr/search?hl=fr&q="error""ruler"&btnG=Rech...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2007-09-24 06:59:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

have a nice day everybody...

Mohamed Mehenoun
Algeria
Local time: 17:09
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in ArabicArabic
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  1045: ... a good guess ...
1 hr
  -> thank you very much

neutral  Tony M: No need for 'rule', Moh (not 'ruler' = short ones used by schoolkids! / Be careful here! As your ref. shows, 'tolerance interval' and 'tolerance' are not expressed the same way; t.i. is not the usual expression in building specs.
7 hrs
  -> good morning Tony ...thanks tony ...but it's more to tell that when your reading is more or less faulty and that the error or the mistake is around +-5mm... please see note above :)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
5 mm under a 2 m straightedge


Explanation:
such that the gap under a 2 m straightedge should not. exceed 5 mm. Any out of tolerance areas should be. rectified with a suitable rapid setting leveling ...
webapps.vicroads.vic.gov.au/.../ccb7ce53c77ab74dca256d5f0028ed02/$FILE/tn063.pdf

The permissible deviations of plaster work are 3 and 6 mm under a 2 m straightedge for grades I and II finishes respec-tively (SANS 10155 : 1980 Accuracy in ...
cnci.org.za/inf/leaflets_html/plaster.html

Variations in gap under a 2 m straightedge (with feet) placed anywhere on the surface to be not more than 3 mm. ...
www.nelincs.gov.uk/NR/rdonlyres/CC3A1390-9D2D-48D3-B555-A5B...


xxxBourth
Local time: 18:09
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4135

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: The voice of authority!
10 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search