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tirant

English translation: tie / stay

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:tirant
English translation:tie / stay
Entered by: chris collister
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11:20 Feb 10, 2009
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Construction / Civil Engineering
French term or phrase: tirant
Les *tirants* sont les éléments qui font la liaison entre les fers de grill et les éléments de convoyeurs

The explanation says it all, but what is the correct civ. eng term? Holder? Puller? Tie-bar?
chris collister
France
Local time: 16:13
tie / stay
Explanation:
Without more context these 'tirants' could be lots of different things. I'm assuming here that it refers to pieces used to hold a machine (the 'convoyeur') to the structure of the building, to prevent it moving. Now that could be tie-rods, stays (especially if the machine is rather tall), cables, straps, and several other things. I'm assuming these things are really part of the machine, rather than of the reinforced concrete building frame.

The French 'tirant' is vague - maybe deliberately so. I suggest 'tie', which retains this vagueness, or 'stay' if that fits the geometry of the arrangement.
Selected response from:

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 11:13
Grading comment
Tie it is. As you say, suitably vague. Thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +4tie / stay
Robin Levey


  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
tie / stay


Explanation:
Without more context these 'tirants' could be lots of different things. I'm assuming here that it refers to pieces used to hold a machine (the 'convoyeur') to the structure of the building, to prevent it moving. Now that could be tie-rods, stays (especially if the machine is rather tall), cables, straps, and several other things. I'm assuming these things are really part of the machine, rather than of the reinforced concrete building frame.

The French 'tirant' is vague - maybe deliberately so. I suggest 'tie', which retains this vagueness, or 'stay' if that fits the geometry of the arrangement.

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 11:13
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 177
Grading comment
Tie it is. As you say, suitably vague. Thanks.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Vague is right. I like "tie", which is vaguer than "tie-rod"


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: Rod, standoff, ... As MM says, could have lots of different names.
1 hr

agree  cjohnstone
2 hrs

agree  asptech: "Tie-bar" would be the safest bet but, as noted, "tirant" can have several different connotations.
7 hrs

agree  narasimha
19 hrs
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