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patte à bretelle

English translation: having received the picture

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13:14 Dec 2, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Construction / Civil Engineering
French term or phrase: patte à bretelle
A fastening for attaching a gutter to a roof. I can provide a diagram of it if anybody is interested in seeing what it looks like.
"la patte dite à bretelle comprend en fait une patte fixée à ses deux extrémités en partie verticale sur le support du chéneau et une patte de maintien soudée sur la face extérieure haute du chéneau en plomb et qui est ensuite passé entre les deux points de fixation de la première patte puis rabattue, la première patte laisse généralement un espace de 50 à 60mm entre ses deux points de fixation, la patte de maintien faisant 40mm de largeur cela laisse 0.5 à 1cm de jeu de chaque côté pour absorber les phénomènes de dilatation important dans le cas d’éléments en plomb."
Laura Robertson
France
Local time: 17:38
English translation:having received the picture
Explanation:
I'd call it a "two-piece fixing" and the hellwithit: "the two-piece fixing consists of a clip fixed at both ends to the vertical face of the gutter support, and a holding lug soldered to upper part of the external face of the lead gutter, which is inserted between the two fixing points of the clip component and folded over ..."

If the reader has the picture, it will be perfectly clear whatever you put!!!!

Given that they have to describe it in detail, I hardly think it is a standard component for which you will find a readymade translation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 hrs 30 mins (2004-12-02 22:45:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think I\'m going to prove myself wrong! On thinking about it, I suspected this technique is an old one no longer in general use. What made me work this way was the noise my roof is making now, as the temperature drops. I had the roof redone a couple of years ago, but the techniques used 100 years ago are either unknown today or too expensive to be realistically implemented. So the zinc flashings which WERE attached by sundry secret (concealed) fixings, involving tabs soldered onto the back faces and locking into mating tabs nailed to the woodwork, are NOW NAILED to the wood. What happens when the temperature changes is that the zinc panels, which were previously relatively free to move and made no noise, are now fixed at regular intervals, so the metal moves suddenly as it shrinks or expands, making rifleshot noises!

So I looked into my Dad\'s 1938 edition of Mitchell\'s \"Building Construction\", and found reference to \"secret tacks\", a recommended way of fixing \"large lead coated vertical surfaces\". The \"tack\" is a strip of lead soldered to the back of the lead covering. The loose end of the strip is passed through a slot cut in the boarding, folded down and secured with copper nails. Copper nails apart, this is similar to your fixing. \"The tack, or secret tack, as it is called, fixes the covering securely, is not so unsightly as other methods, and allows more freedom for the lead covering to expand\".

From \"tack\", via the Scott/Penguin Dict. of Building, I move to tingle, that fizzyfingerfeeling. No, seriously folks:

tingle (1), cleat, ear, latchet, tab, tack, etc. A strip of sheet metal about 50mm wide, used as a fixing to hold down the edge of supported sheetmetal roofing or to secure hollow roll or seam. One end is nailed to the roof timbers and the other folded into the edge of the sheet to be secured. Tingles are also used as clips for pipes or electric cables and to fix panes of patent glazing or replacement slates.

So maybe \"tack and tingle\", maybe not to be confused with slap and tickle. Certainly, though, without the picture no one would understand.
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 17:38
Grading comment
Well, I think that it would be hard to find a more thorough explanation than that. Thank you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1having received the picturexxxBourth
1 +1cleat
DocteurPC


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
patte à bretelle
cleat


Explanation:
just a few suggestions - I tried to Google it, but got nowhere
patte in construction = cleat
bretelle also in construction = grip fastening buckle
maybe somebody can combine this into a term that makes sense for your text


    Reference: http://granddictionnaire.com
DocteurPC
Canada
Local time: 11:38
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Assimina Vavoula
12 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
patte à bretelle
having received the picture


Explanation:
I'd call it a "two-piece fixing" and the hellwithit: "the two-piece fixing consists of a clip fixed at both ends to the vertical face of the gutter support, and a holding lug soldered to upper part of the external face of the lead gutter, which is inserted between the two fixing points of the clip component and folded over ..."

If the reader has the picture, it will be perfectly clear whatever you put!!!!

Given that they have to describe it in detail, I hardly think it is a standard component for which you will find a readymade translation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 hrs 30 mins (2004-12-02 22:45:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think I\'m going to prove myself wrong! On thinking about it, I suspected this technique is an old one no longer in general use. What made me work this way was the noise my roof is making now, as the temperature drops. I had the roof redone a couple of years ago, but the techniques used 100 years ago are either unknown today or too expensive to be realistically implemented. So the zinc flashings which WERE attached by sundry secret (concealed) fixings, involving tabs soldered onto the back faces and locking into mating tabs nailed to the woodwork, are NOW NAILED to the wood. What happens when the temperature changes is that the zinc panels, which were previously relatively free to move and made no noise, are now fixed at regular intervals, so the metal moves suddenly as it shrinks or expands, making rifleshot noises!

So I looked into my Dad\'s 1938 edition of Mitchell\'s \"Building Construction\", and found reference to \"secret tacks\", a recommended way of fixing \"large lead coated vertical surfaces\". The \"tack\" is a strip of lead soldered to the back of the lead covering. The loose end of the strip is passed through a slot cut in the boarding, folded down and secured with copper nails. Copper nails apart, this is similar to your fixing. \"The tack, or secret tack, as it is called, fixes the covering securely, is not so unsightly as other methods, and allows more freedom for the lead covering to expand\".

From \"tack\", via the Scott/Penguin Dict. of Building, I move to tingle, that fizzyfingerfeeling. No, seriously folks:

tingle (1), cleat, ear, latchet, tab, tack, etc. A strip of sheet metal about 50mm wide, used as a fixing to hold down the edge of supported sheetmetal roofing or to secure hollow roll or seam. One end is nailed to the roof timbers and the other folded into the edge of the sheet to be secured. Tingles are also used as clips for pipes or electric cables and to fix panes of patent glazing or replacement slates.

So maybe \"tack and tingle\", maybe not to be confused with slap and tickle. Certainly, though, without the picture no one would understand.

xxxBourth
Local time: 17:38
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4135
Grading comment
Well, I think that it would be hard to find a more thorough explanation than that. Thank you.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charlotte Allen: Totally.
6 mins
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