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...de façon à assurer une émission résultante la plus proche d'une loi linéaire.

English translation: linear law [control characteristic]

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:loi linéaire [technical/eletcronic etc.]
English translation:linear law [control characteristic]
Entered by: Tony M
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23:06 Feb 17, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Construction / Civil Engineering / technical specifications
French term or phrase: ...de façon à assurer une émission résultante la plus proche d'une loi linéaire.
It's getting late here and I'm getting bogged down in this job that's got to be done before holidays start tomorrow ! Would anyone care to help me work out the phrase above taken from the following sentence:

"Chaque vanne motorisée sera sélectionnée en fonction de la précision de réglage, ainsi que des caractéristiques du circuit dans lequel elle doit régler le débit de fluide, de façon à assurer une émission résultante la plus proche d'une loi linéaire, en fonction de la grandeur réglée (température) en appliquant les recommandations du constructeur."

Many thanks - your help is much appreciated
Clair@Lexeme
France
Local time: 02:15
...in such a way as to ensure that the resulting output follows a linear law as far as possible
Explanation:
Just an alternative take, very close to the original, of course, but a couple of point may be important.

1) I'm not entirely convinced that this 'emmision' is referring in fact to the flow of water (etc.) --- that might well be 'débit', as used in the previous phrase. I think we could be talking about, for example, heat output [once again, Asker, a little bit more background context could save a lot of head scratching here!] --- this is to some extent born out by the fact that the 'quantity' being measured for control purposes is temperature.

2) And I think tha 'linear law' being referred to is not some specific law of physics, but rather, the 'control law' [a term often used in technical contetxts] --- it basically means that if you set the control to ¼, you get ¼ of the desired result, if you set it to ½, you get ½, and so on...

I think they are taking a very overall view here, and saying that the COMPLETE control loop of setting thermostat / temperature sensor / control circuit / motorized valve / heat output device (e.g.) must give an OVERALL linear law, when all these factors are combined. Of course it can never be perfect, but sophisticated, modern, computerized systems can do a pretty good job. Reduced to its simplest level, it would mean that when the valve lever (etc.) is in mid-position, the flow should be 50%, etc.

All does depend on the wider context, but these are the sort of points I would be looking to consider...

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Note added at 8 hrs 48 mins (2005-02-18 07:54:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oh, dear, sorry about those typos:

points
émission
the

:-(

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs 58 mins (2005-02-18 15:04:59 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

In reply to Jane\'s rather tart response, I was moved to investigate dear Monsieur Darcy and his fascinating law, only to discover that it relates to the flow of fluids through granular or permeable materials, and is specifically relevant in disciplines like hydrology --- so quite frankly, I think it is way off context here for a heating valve; but maybe Jane will be able to show me just how wrong I am... ;-)
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 02:15
Grading comment
Wow - what rapid responses and all extremely helpful - points go to Dusty for his extremely useful explanations - it was a heating system by the way - sorry for not indicating that before. Many thanks to all three of you - you really helped me out !
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1so the ensuing outflow is as close at possibleJane Lamb-Ruiz
3...in such a way as to ensure that the resulting output follows a linear law as far as possible
Tony M
3...in a manner that assures the resulting output is as close to linear as possible.
Alex Lane


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
...de façon à assurer une émission résultante la plus proche d'une loi linéaire.
...in a manner that assures the resulting output is as close to linear as possible.


Explanation:
"Output," is here, speaking of flow through the gate.

Alex Lane
Local time: 18:15
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
...de façon à assurer une émission résultante la plus proche d'une loi linéaire.
so the ensuing outflow is as close at possible


Explanation:
to a linear flow path law...

as in Darcy's law

Linear flow paths assumed in Darcy’s law




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Note added at 13 mins (2005-02-17 23:19:10 GMT)
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correction: so the ensuing outflow is as close as possible to a linear flowpath

This is apparently Darcy\'s law

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Note added at 13 mins (2005-02-17 23:19:44 GMT)
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Have a nice holiday by the way

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Note added at 14 mins (2005-02-17 23:20:34 GMT)
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in hydraulics, the term is flowpaths...:)

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Note added at 15 mins (2005-02-17 23:21:09 GMT)
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and an emission in hydraulics is outflow...as opposed to inflow..

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 57

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: ...though not sure about that 'flowpath'; I haven't looked up Darcy's Law, but I think this is simpler: it's just a linear response 'law' between valve control input / desired output temperature
8 hrs
  -> suggest y ou do...
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
...in such a way as to ensure that the resulting output follows a linear law as far as possible


Explanation:
Just an alternative take, very close to the original, of course, but a couple of point may be important.

1) I'm not entirely convinced that this 'emmision' is referring in fact to the flow of water (etc.) --- that might well be 'débit', as used in the previous phrase. I think we could be talking about, for example, heat output [once again, Asker, a little bit more background context could save a lot of head scratching here!] --- this is to some extent born out by the fact that the 'quantity' being measured for control purposes is temperature.

2) And I think tha 'linear law' being referred to is not some specific law of physics, but rather, the 'control law' [a term often used in technical contetxts] --- it basically means that if you set the control to ¼, you get ¼ of the desired result, if you set it to ½, you get ½, and so on...

I think they are taking a very overall view here, and saying that the COMPLETE control loop of setting thermostat / temperature sensor / control circuit / motorized valve / heat output device (e.g.) must give an OVERALL linear law, when all these factors are combined. Of course it can never be perfect, but sophisticated, modern, computerized systems can do a pretty good job. Reduced to its simplest level, it would mean that when the valve lever (etc.) is in mid-position, the flow should be 50%, etc.

All does depend on the wider context, but these are the sort of points I would be looking to consider...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs 48 mins (2005-02-18 07:54:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oh, dear, sorry about those typos:

points
émission
the

:-(

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs 58 mins (2005-02-18 15:04:59 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

In reply to Jane\'s rather tart response, I was moved to investigate dear Monsieur Darcy and his fascinating law, only to discover that it relates to the flow of fluids through granular or permeable materials, and is specifically relevant in disciplines like hydrology --- so quite frankly, I think it is way off context here for a heating valve; but maybe Jane will be able to show me just how wrong I am... ;-)

Tony M
France
Local time: 02:15
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1147
Grading comment
Wow - what rapid responses and all extremely helpful - points go to Dusty for his extremely useful explanations - it was a heating system by the way - sorry for not indicating that before. Many thanks to all three of you - you really helped me out !
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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