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1 sachet de sucre vanillé

English translation: 1 sachet vanilla sugar / 1 tsp vanilla extract

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:1 sachet de sucre vanillé
English translation:1 sachet vanilla sugar / 1 tsp vanilla extract
Entered by: Hattie Hill
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15:42 Jan 19, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / measurements
French term or phrase: 1 sachet de sucre vanillé
How many teaspoons of vanilla or vanilla extract = 1 sachet? I've done a bit of research and find that the average "sachet" contains around 70 g of sucre vanillé. This question was a Kudoz a couple of years ago (see below) but I really disagree with the answer that was chosen (1 Tablespoon).

I think that 1 sachet roughly equals 1 teaspoon...Qu'est-ce que vous en pensez ? Merci à l'avance !

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/355596?rifle_url=355596,355603,355...

FYI: This is for a clafoutis recipe.
1 lb raspberries
1/4 cup cornstarch
2 cups sugar
2 **sachet de sucre vanillé**
2 eggs and 2 yolks
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup milk
1 Tbs. butter
1 pinch salt.
Hattie Hill
Local time: 06:10
1 sachet vanilla sugar
Explanation:
-

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Note added at 8 mins (2006-01-19 15:50:17 GMT)
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It is normally sold in sachets, but I would put the volume of a sachet at a tablespoon maximum. However it isn't vanilla or vanilla extract, but sugar that has been flavoured by being stored with a vanilla pod in it, in my opinion :-)
Selected response from:

Sue Pasco
Local time: 12:10
Grading comment
I don't think we'll ever come to a consensus with this one. Most recipes in the States (cookies, cakes) call for 1 tsp of vanilla so I'm gonna stick with that. I'll have to look for vanilla sugar when I move back to the States in April! Merci à tous !
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +91 sachet vanilla sugar
Sue Pasco
5 +3vanilla flavoured sugar ; vanilla essence
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
4 +31 3/4 teaspoon vanilla sugarRHELLER
4 +21 tbsp sugar + 3 drops essence
Tony M
51 packet of vanilla flavored sugar
Deniz Uysal


Discussion entries: 16





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
1 sachet de sucre vanillé
1 sachet vanilla sugar


Explanation:
-

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Note added at 8 mins (2006-01-19 15:50:17 GMT)
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It is normally sold in sachets, but I would put the volume of a sachet at a tablespoon maximum. However it isn't vanilla or vanilla extract, but sugar that has been flavoured by being stored with a vanilla pod in it, in my opinion :-)

Sue Pasco
Local time: 12:10
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
I don't think we'll ever come to a consensus with this one. Most recipes in the States (cookies, cakes) call for 1 tsp of vanilla so I'm gonna stick with that. I'll have to look for vanilla sugar when I move back to the States in April! Merci à tous !

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alison High: the weight is in the sugar, not in the vanilla essence --- and vanilla essence is stronger, so a teaspoon would probably do it
9 mins
  -> thanks!

agree  Sylvia Smith: I have yet to receive my Michelin stars, but this sounds right to me :)
10 mins
  -> thanks!

agree  Alison Jenner: definitely
15 mins
  -> thanks!

agree  SusanMurray: Checked on the sachet and what I buy weighs in at 7.5g/sachet and like you say Susan, it is probably about a tablespoonful :-)
15 mins
  -> thanks!

agree  Linda Young: Some sugar is flavoured by a vanilla pod, but you can actually buy a sahet of vanilla sugar in France, and it comes in the same format as yeast, so i would imagine the same measurement
17 mins
  -> thanks!

agree  Aisha Maniar
33 mins

agree  Claire Cox: I make my own vanilla sugar in a jar with a vanilla pod, so surely some Americans do the same! Maybe you could say i sachet of vanilla sugar (or 1 tsp vanilla extract)
36 mins

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Again, whilst you may flavour your own you can buy these in sachets, as has been said, tiny things, harldy more than a teaspoonful !
46 mins

agree  Enza Longo
50 mins

neutral  emiledgar: Sucre vanille does NOT exist in the US. I would say a half tsp of extract would be plenty for this recipe
2 hrs
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28 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
1 sachet de sucre vanillé
1 3/4 teaspoon vanilla sugar


Explanation:
1 3/4 teaspoon vanilla sugar ( 7.4 g = 1.75 tsp approx)
U.S. teaspoon measurement is standardized for cooking/baking

réf. 17124

10 SUCRE VANILLE VAHINE SACHS7,5G
10 sachets x 7,5 g

http://www.telemarket.fr/mkg/sucre_vanille_vahine.htm?codeAf...

4.2 g per teaspoon granulated sugar
6.3g = 1.5 tsp
7.4 g = 1.75 tsp approx
8.4 g = 2 tsp


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Note added at 31 mins (2006-01-19 16:13:12 GMT)
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Note: 1 tablespoon = 2 sachets (7.5 g)
Sugar
1 cup = 200 grams
1 tablespoon = 15 grams
http://www.theworldwidegourmet.com/general/conversion.htm

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Note added at 33 mins (2006-01-19 16:15:52 GMT)
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One pouch of Dr. Oetker Vanilla Sugar is equivalent to 1 - 2 tsp of vanilla extract.
www.oetker.ca/cgi-bin/WebObjects/oetker.woa/ wa/page?focus=US&option=prd_920&destination=page_36


    Reference: http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/gram_calc.htm
RHELLER
United States
Local time: 04:10
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 42

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  SusanMurray: Hello Rita, I guess we use the same brand of vanilla sugar :-))
2 mins
  -> Hi Susan, I will take any brand I can get, but I admit that I bake rarely now with the children grown plus we have several good patisseries :-)

agree  Dr Sue Levy: yes, 1-2 tsp vanilla extract - big difference between brands there too!
28 mins
  -> thanks sister :-)

neutral  Tony M: But Rita - a 'neutral' is not a criticism; I can't 'agree' cos my own knowledge is different (and I've been baking for nearly 40 years too! and French clafoutis for 10 of them...) // LOVE the photo!
5 hrs
  -> pure vanilla extract - your essence is more concentrated - that is not a reason to give me a neutral. I have been baking for almost 40 years.

agree  Mark Nathan: careful Dusty, vanilla flavourings can be a very personal issue, full of childhood memories
6 hrs
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55 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
1 sachet de sucre vanillé
vanilla flavoured sugar ; vanilla essence


Explanation:
Discovered this over 20 years ago. Didn't even know it existed before coming to France. Those tiny pink sachets of the stuf contain barely more than a teaspoonful. The aim really is to add flavour. Although you can flavour your own as already indicated, for practical purposes, UK folks would not bother with the extra sugar (what's one tspn between clafoutis-eaters?!) and just add a couple of drops of vanilla essence instead. Practical rather than purist but understandabe for your target.

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 12:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
4 hrs

agree  xxxfrenchloki: absolutely
5 hrs

agree  Rachel Fell
16 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
1 sachet de sucre vanillé
1 packet of vanilla flavored sugar


Explanation:
They actually come in 5 gr. packets. About 1 tablespoon of powder like substance that is sweet with the vanilla flavour.

Deniz Uysal
Local time: 13:10
Native speaker of: Native in TurkishTurkish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
1 sachet de sucre vanillé
1 tbsp sugar + 3 drops essence


Explanation:
I would say that the contents of one sachet DOES indeed = approx. a tablespoon --- but for heaven's sake don't try putting that much vanilla in! 2 or 3 drops of essence should be plenty, you could err on the higher side with 'real', but NOT with 'artificial'

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Note added at 5 hrs (2006-01-19 21:12:33 GMT)
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Rita and others have pointed out that 1 sachet = 7½ g which is about ¼ oz i.e. ¼ of a level tbsp of caster sugar (so my Mum always said)

As Nikki has pointed out, adding the extra amount of sugar is irrelevant, what really counts is just the vanilla essence or whatever.

Odd idea to put cornstarch in a clafoutis, for heaven's sake! My neighbour would throw up her hands in horror at the idea --- and she makes THE BEST clafoutis!



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Note added at 16 hrs (2006-01-20 08:27:33 GMT)
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Rita seems surprised by my query-raising 'neutral', but as I say, it seems as if US van. extract is weaker than UK essence.

From mnay years of using recipes in the UK, we almost invariably talk about using 'vanilla essence' just a few drops at a time; it is so powerful, using it by the teaspoon would be overbearing, unless you were making several pints of custard or something...

So it seems to me that there must be a great deal of difference between the strength of US 'vanilla extract' and our UK (and European in general) 'essence'.

That might sound a word of warning for your recipe translation --- if this is for either a US or A UK readership, you can choose one or the other; if not, then you would be well advised to highlight this difference, otherwise someone is going to be mighty disappointed!

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Note added at 16 hrs (2006-01-20 08:31:38 GMT)
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Thanks, Mark; for that word of caution; I entirely agree, but the fact remains, quickly looking through a selection of my dozens of UK recipe books, they almost unanimously talk about vanilla essence in 'drops' -- and I don't believe this is a general difference in UK/US tastes, but rather represents, as I've said, a transatlantic difference in the flavouring product itself.

From the format of her recipe so far, it seems that Hattie must be after the US solution, but I'd like to register my point for the benefit of future users of the glossary who might possibly need a European solution --- we're quite good at baking over here too you know!


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Note added at 16 hrs (2006-01-20 08:36:56 GMT)
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Hattie, as you so rightly say, you need to translate your recipe for the benefit of those poor, disadvantaged souls who may not have access to the 'real thing', and as others have said before me, the actual amount of additional sugar is negligible, I think you could ignore that, and simply go for the vanilla flavouring (you could always add "or 1 sachet vanilla sugar if available").

But do be wary of this difference in strength; it's just one of many AE / BE traps that people might not be too aware of.


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Note added at 1 day5 hrs (2006-01-20 21:06:30 GMT)
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As far as the UK is concerned, the term 'vanilla essence' is, I believe, reserved for REAL vanilla --- what Rita and others seem to be suggesting is called 'extract' in the US.

'vanilla flavouring' is the artificial variety.

But as far as I know, both 'flavouring' and 'essence' have similar strength in the UK (and France), but the US extract seems weaker.

Perhaps it is a question of the degree of refinement / distillation, or however it is produced...

Tony M
France
Local time: 12:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 362

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rachel Fell: (not a dig!) my view, as per above note - like the new pic. :)
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Rachel! Sorry, was in a rush and didn't read through all notes... Glad you like it!

agree  Mark Nathan: yes, I am fairly sure that "vanilla flavouring" is weaker than "vanilla essence".
1 day3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Mark! Please see added note above...
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