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de bonne tenue

English translation: See comments below...

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12:09 Feb 11, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / cooking technique: recipe for brioche stuffed with foie gras
French term or phrase: de bonne tenue
The usually trusty Collins doesn't provide anything appropriate for the context (good manners/properly dressed...), nor does the Petit Robert.
All I've come up with so far are generalizations, but feel this needs to be a bit more specific - perhaps regarding the desired texture or appearance of the foie gras when it's cooked to a tee and no more... "soft/hard/firm/melt-in-the-mouth....? Whatever it should look/feel/taste like, apart from still pink ?


Pour que la cuisson de ces brioches au foie gras n’excède pas les 20 min recommandées, et surtout pour que le foie soit parfaitement cuit, c’est-à-dire ******de bonne tenue****** mais encore rosé, il faut utiliser de fines escalopes

Any help from ye gastronomes would be much appreciated
Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:00
English translation:See comments below...
Explanation:
Just as a guide, and for comparison: when I cook foie gras "solid" in a terrine, it takes about 45 mins; hence you can see that their 20 min cooking time is rather short, hence why thin escalopes must be used, to ensure they are cooked through enough to have firmed up, whilst still keeping their slightly pink-tinged colour.

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Note added at 8 hrs (2007-02-11 21:03:27 GMT)
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A little note to respond to Cervin's suggestion of "al dente" — since "foie gras" starts off soft, the concept of "all dente" doesn't really work; if it were "all dente", it would be already ruined!

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Note added at 8 hrs (2007-02-11 21:04:54 GMT)
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It's basically more like the concept of its having "set" than anything else; note that when pan-frying escalopes of foie gras, the cooking time need to be *very* short, but buried in buns and cooked in the oven, it will take longer

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Note added at 4 days (2007-02-15 22:41:10 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Well, I would describe foie gras cooked in a brioche as having a texture not that far from butter, so if you feel that can be suitably described as "soft and silky", all well and good. I think the important thing is that they are saying "cooked enough to be set, but not so much as to lose its proper colour"
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 11:00
Grading comment
Thanks Tony: even though this didn't give me "the adequate term", this answer was the most helpful as a guide. In the end, I'm going to propose "with a soft, silky texture", which I eventually found on a couple of sites, to describe perfectly cooked foie gras. Let me know if this is utterly wrong!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +5the right consistencyTerry Richards
3 +2holds its shapeJennifer White
4 +1See comments below...
Tony M
4 +1have the right texturejean-jacques alexandre
3 +1looks done
Rachel Fell
2 +1solid enough
Francis MARC


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
solid enough


Explanation:
pas fondu ou en miettes

Francis MARC
Lithuania
Local time: 12:00
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 52

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, but "solid" isn't a very appealing word to use in culinary, we'd probably say "firm enough"
52 mins
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
the right consistency


Explanation:
Another option

Terry Richards
France
Local time: 11:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: would seem to fit best in this context. to check whether it's firm enough ties in with having the right consistency.
28 mins

agree  Enza Longo
32 mins

neutral  Tony M: I'm not quite sure I would refer to the "consistency" of a basically solid object (in the way you might refer to the consistency of dough, etc.)
38 mins

agree  Thais Maria Lips
6 hrs

agree  Mark Nathan
9 hrs

agree  wolmix: absolument
1 day23 hrs
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41 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
looks done


Explanation:
that it looks done but is still pink
maybe a bit informal?

actually the done/pink ref. here relates to the lamb, and the brioche /liver doesn't mention degree of cooking, but still!


Marinated Roast Leg Of Lamb
Brioche De Foie Gras Brioche filled with foie gras and baked ... for 18 minutes per pound, basting it often, until it is done but still pink in the centre. ...
www.miettas.com.au/cgi/srch_recipes?id=643 - 22k - Supplemental Result - Cached - Similar pages

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:00
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 80

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Personally, I wouldn't use "looks", since it should "look" still tinged with pink; but it should "feel" right... // Don't forget it's hidden inside a bun!
18 mins
  -> Hello Tony, good point, was going to put "is done" at first, though something more specific may be needed\\oh yes - "feel" in the intuitive sense, then?!

agree  Cervin: Tony's idea-f'eels done', maybe. All the Ghits I found say cook for 1min on each side-and you can hardly say 'al dente' here although it might well be appropriate !
2 hrs
  -> thank you Cervin - I suppose I just wonder whether the chef ought to be prodding it with his/her finger, so I might just put "is done"!
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42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
holds its shape


Explanation:
just another suggestion - I've often seen this term in recipes

Jennifer White
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:00
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Emma Cypher-Dournes: that's what I would say too.
5 mins
  -> thanks Emma

neutral  writeaway: don't see how that fits in here.
7 mins

neutral  Tony M: Can often be used for things like pasta etc. that mustn't disintegrate; but not really applicable in this particular instance, since it is held in shape by the brioche anyway
17 mins

agree  Odette Grille: The shape changes much if you overcook foie gras. You may find there are only nuggets left...
40 mins
  -> thanks!
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
have the right texture


Explanation:
neither underdone or overdone, it is mastered after a few try, not to many though, considering the price this "commodity" commands

jean-jacques alexandre
France
Local time: 11:00
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  PB Trans
20 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
See comments below...


Explanation:
Just as a guide, and for comparison: when I cook foie gras "solid" in a terrine, it takes about 45 mins; hence you can see that their 20 min cooking time is rather short, hence why thin escalopes must be used, to ensure they are cooked through enough to have firmed up, whilst still keeping their slightly pink-tinged colour.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2007-02-11 21:03:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A little note to respond to Cervin's suggestion of "al dente" — since "foie gras" starts off soft, the concept of "all dente" doesn't really work; if it were "all dente", it would be already ruined!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2007-02-11 21:04:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It's basically more like the concept of its having "set" than anything else; note that when pan-frying escalopes of foie gras, the cooking time need to be *very* short, but buried in buns and cooked in the oven, it will take longer

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 days (2007-02-15 22:41:10 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Well, I would describe foie gras cooked in a brioche as having a texture not that far from butter, so if you feel that can be suitably described as "soft and silky", all well and good. I think the important thing is that they are saying "cooked enough to be set, but not so much as to lose its proper colour"

Tony M
France
Local time: 11:00
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 382
Grading comment
Thanks Tony: even though this didn't give me "the adequate term", this answer was the most helpful as a guide. In the end, I'm going to propose "with a soft, silky texture", which I eventually found on a couple of sites, to describe perfectly cooked foie gras. Let me know if this is utterly wrong!
Notes to answerer
Asker: I'll also mention that it's a possible overinterpretation! And will probably incorporate "firm, but..." I suppose "à point" would be cheating!

Asker: Thanks again! From what you say, "just set" might be a gd interpretation of "de bonne tenue" in this context.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jean-jacques alexandre: Still it does not give us the "adequate" term, easier to cook & eat than translate
5 hrs
  -> Merci, J-J ! And more fun, too!
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