ProZ.com global directory of translation services
 The translation workplace
Ideas
KudoZ home » French to English » Cooking / Culinary

piment en poudre

English translation: chilli powder

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:piment en poudre
English translation:chilli powder
Entered by: Carol Gullidge
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

12:20 Feb 13, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / distinguishing between pepper types in English
French term or phrase: piment en poudre
Seems extremely simple, but my difficulty is expressing the 2 sorts of pepper in English. I've translated "poivre" as "pepper" throughout, but keep coming across "piment en poudre" in the same recipes. Where this has been made clear (eg, piment d'espelette), this is no problem.

The question is: if it's NOT specified in French, which of the many possible types of pepper is this MOST likely to be referring to? (I'm used to using, eg, chilli powder, paprika, etc) My GUESS is that it will be referring to something hot, but have to be careful not to poison the readers....!

• 500 g de gnocchis
• 1 bocal (190 g) de caviar de tomate à l’ail
• 12 tomates séchées

• 1/2 c. à c. de **piment en poudre**
• sel et poivre

....Saupoudrer de piment, saler, poivrer généreusement et faire réchauffer si nécessaire


Thanks!
Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:05
chilli powder
Explanation:
I think you're right, it actually refers to the chilli powder, especially since "poivre" is also to be used (next line).
Selected response from:

Helene Martin-Hernandez
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:05
Grading comment
Thanks, Hélène! You were first with this answer, which was confirmed by the contents of Tony's spice rack
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +7chilli powder
Helene Martin-Hernandez
5 +1powdered cayenne
Sheila Wilson
4 +2chilli powder
Enza Longo
4 +2chilli powderChristine Schmit
5 -1powdered pepper
Alfredo Tanús
3what recipe?xxxBourth
2 +1paprika
Jonathan MacKerron
3chili powder
cjohnstone
4 -3red pepper powder
Anton Konashenok


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
chilli powder


Explanation:
I think you're right, it actually refers to the chilli powder, especially since "poivre" is also to be used (next line).

Helene Martin-Hernandez
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks, Hélène! You were first with this answer, which was confirmed by the contents of Tony's spice rack

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Sheila Wilson: chili powder is a mix of spices (see wikipedia definition)
11 mins

agree  Tony M: Yes, this is what it is called in my store-cupboard; it is not a mix at all, just "ground chilli"
37 mins
  -> thank you Tony, the Grand Dictionnaire also says "Ground chilli peppers", so that must be it!

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
52 mins
  -> merci

agree  Jocelyne S: IMO, cayenne or paprika are not what is called for in this recipe.
1 hr
  -> merci

agree  tatyana000
1 hr
  -> merci

agree  Charlotte Allen: Yes, this matches the ambiguity of the French term, as can be hot or mild.
2 hrs

agree  Gabrielle Bannard: If you search the web for other recipes that take chilli powder (often they also include cumin), you'll see that "piment en poudre" is used for chilli powder.
2 hrs

agree  cmwilliams
2 hrs

neutral  Mark Riepling: In the USA chili powder comes as a spice mix with cumin, and other spices. "Powdered Chili" might remove the ambiguity although I am not sure whether it is any guide to whether or how picant it should be.
2 hrs

agree  Ingeborg Gowans
7 hrs

agree  Muriel Blanc
7 hrs

disagree  writeaway: if someone actually uses 'chili powder', which includes cumin and oregano, and all that is meant is hot pepper, it is going radically change the taste of the dish, if not ruin it outright. risky way to go.
5 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
chilli powder


Explanation:
seems the most likely to me

Christine Schmit
Luxembourg
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in LetzeburgeschLetzeburgesch

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
36 mins
  -> thanks

agree  jean-jacques alexandre: yo tambien,caramba !!
19 hrs
  -> thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
chili powder


Explanation:
considering all your explanations (swwet to ask such well documented question) think chili powder is ok

cjohnstone
France
Local time: 05:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 14
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
powdered pepper


Explanation:
Carol: this is not grains of pepper, but its powder.

I've also found a reference related to vietnamese cuisine in Google, so I guess this must be a hot pepper.

Alfredo Tanús
Local time: 01:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Spanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Sheila Wilson: pepper defaults to black or white pepper, neither of which qualify as "piments"
11 mins

disagree  Tony M: No, that would be "poivre moulu"
36 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
chilli powder


Explanation:
Lexique TEXCAN
- [ Translate this page ]
Piment en poudre. Angl., chili powder. Sah8,68. Sans doute pour 'texyoh chilli'. .TEXIPALLI: tēxipalli, pour tēnxipalli. Les lèvres. Angl., lip. Sah10,111. ...
sites.estvideo.net/malinal/t/nahuatlTEXCAN.html - 31k - Cached - Similar pages

Enza Longo
Canada
Local time: 00:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
35 mins
  -> thanks, Tony! I thought it was pretty straight-forward until I saw the various interpretations of piment. I agree though that the translation should be as ambiguous as the original

agree  Gabrielle Bannard: Yes, the site you found is a good source!
2 hrs
  -> thanks, AWOE!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
powdered cayenne


Explanation:
or cayenne powder

I've disagreed with various other answers - I am certain that this is the term. It's true that it doesn't specify that it comes from the cayenne plant, but this is the common name for hot pepper spice powder in English and as you say, when it's something specific the name is given. I'm sure it's a hot one because of the quantity used. The only general term possible would be 'hot pepper powder' but I'm not sure that would be clear to anyone

Sheila Wilson
Spain
Local time: 04:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: was what I was about to enter too. makes the most sense in this recipe.
6 mins

neutral  Tony M: Need to be very careful here, a mistake could be serious! Usually, I've seen Cayenne pepper referred to as "Piment de cayenne' or "piment fort"; cayenne/paprika is risky, "fixing" the ambiguity of the FR term. / chilli can be "mild" or "hot"
19 mins
  -> If Carol can't compromise (see red pepper powder) and can't be specific, what hope has she? In my book, chili powder is hot too so is that OK?

neutral  Helene Martin-Hernandez: "piment de cayenne" also exists en French, and this is not what is indicated here.
19 mins

neutral  Charlotte Allen: I also think cayenne would be specified as "piment de cayenne" or even "piment de poudre de cayenne", but it isn't.
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
paprika


Explanation:
is made of sweet peppers, but ...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 mins (2007-02-13 12:31:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

le Grand Robert & Collins claims "piment (=poudre) = paprika"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 49 mins (2007-02-13 13:10:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Grand Robert "paprika = Variété de piment utilisée en poudre"

Jonathan MacKerron
Local time: 05:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: RC says piment DOUX en poudre is paprika/but gnocchi are sooo bland. with anchovis and tomatoes a bit of hot pepper makes sense.
4 mins
  -> but the mild stuff is probably what is meant here, as it is sprinkled on the gnoccis

agree  Kate Hudson: Given the quantity and unless it is to be very hot gnocchi I agree that it is paprika added for the colour and flavour
6 mins
  -> thx

disagree  Sheila Wilson: half a coffespoonful of pepper hot? No! paprika is rarely used in quantities of less than a teaspoonful
11 mins
  -> I'll leave the second-guessing to you

agree  Karen Stokes
11 mins
  -> thx

neutral  Tony M: Could be, but IMexp paprika has always been labelled "piment doux"; opting for either cayenne or paprika is risky, as it "fixes" the ambiguity of the FR term.
35 mins

neutral  Charlotte Allen: Have seen too many recipes calling for BOTH 'piment en poudre' and 'paprika' to think that these are generally synonymous.
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -3
red pepper powder


Explanation:
It's a compromise translation: "red pepper" would cover chili, cayenne and paprika - all the same

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 50 mins (2007-02-13 13:11:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Of course it's not a good practice to compromise, but what else can you do when you don't know what the client meant? (Short of asking the client to clarify)

Anton Konashenok
Czech Republic
Local time: 05:05
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  writeaway: heaven help anyone 'compromising' in a recipe
2 mins

disagree  Karen Stokes: sorry, but they're not the same at all
15 mins

disagree  Tony M: Compromise not appropriate here!
34 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
what recipe?


Explanation:
One way to settle the dispute might be to check out other recipes for the same dish on the Ouèbbhe.

Personally, I feel it is chilli powder, given the number of chilli con carne recipes which call for "piment en poudre" (or - that's an exclusive "or" - , alternatively, and therefore making the distinction, paprika).

xxxBourth
Local time: 05:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 88
Notes to answerer
Asker: a good point, as ever. Thanks, Bourth!

Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also: