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cassolette lutee

English translation: [individual ceramic serving dish, sealed with a pastry lid] (NB: verb 'to lute' exists in English)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:cassolette lutée
English translation:[individual ceramic serving dish, sealed with a pastry lid] (NB: verb 'to lute' exists in English)
Entered by: Tony M
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20:40 Feb 27, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
French term or phrase: cassolette lutee
"Cassolette lutee de sole et homard aux cepes"

I haven't found a single reference to "cassolette lutee" online. I'm wondering whether to leave it in French, or translate it as "cassolette of sole and lobster with cepes"?
Gruffalo
Local time: 17:51
"sealed"?
Explanation:
There are quite a few refernces on the Web to OTHER kinds of recipient being "luté(e)" (soupière, terrine, coquille, ...)

As far as I can see, it means "sealed down"; this might be referring to the kind of cooking technique where the lid of a casserole etc. is sealed to its base using (e.g.) a kind of dough, to make it airtight — a low-pressure version of a pressure-cooker, I suppose you might say.

I can only imagine that it means it is sealed down with some kind of lid — but I hasten to emphasize that I don't have any specific knowledge here, this is all pure conjecture!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 hrs (2007-02-28 10:02:27 GMT)
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Ronat is right, the word "cassolette" is often used pretty loosely; I would be inclined to translate it in some way, as I have usually found the term (for the item of crockery) is not well understood in general by English speakers, who are more likely to confuse it with the actual dish "cassoulet"!

It seems there is a tendency to use the term "cassolette" for a type of presentation (hot, in some kind of individual pottery container), rather than specifically the item of crockery.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 18:51
Grading comment
I went with "sealed with a pastry lid" in the end, so ideally would have shared points between Tony and Alain. This was the first answer to mention the dough, though.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
1 +5"sealed"?
Tony M
2 +2with a pastry toppingAlain Pommet
3 -1Kleftiko
Rebecca Parker - Into English Ltd.


  

Answers


45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
with a pastry topping


Explanation:

A tentative 'low'! Am I sticking my neck out too far?

Luter: Fermer hermétiquement une cocotte en utilisant un morceau de détrempe comme joint, entre le récipient et le couvercle.

There's a picture on the tocques tocques site where you can see that there is a cap of pastry similar to a pie.

The time it has taken to write this, others have written similar things but I'll still post this.

Cassolette - well that's like a shallow ramekin dish that the Catalans cook their 'crème caramelle' in.


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Note added at 47 mins (2007-02-27 21:27:41 GMT)
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http://www.toquetoques.com/


    Reference: http://www.linternaute.com/femmes/cuisine/definition/300091/...
Alain Pommet
Local time: 18:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 13

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  roneill: I think cassolette is used quite loosely. Take a look at this one . Looks more like a tureen to me. > www.darcony.com/categorie-247052.html
4 mins
  -> Wow! What a whopper!

agree  Tony M
35 mins
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Kleftiko


Explanation:
Having read other people's answers I remebered a Greek recipe in one of my cook books for Klefticko. The preamble to the dish says " The dish is sealed, like a pie, with a flour dough lid to trap succulence and flavour, although a tight-fitting foil cover, if less attractive, will serve equally well." ..."mix the flour with enough water to make a firm dough. Moisten the rim of the pie dish. Roll out the dough on a floured surface and use to cover the dish so that it is tightly sealed. Bake for 2hrs then breakaway the dough crust and serve (the lamb) hot with boiled potatoes."
So I don't know if this fits the bill or not but I thought it might be useful, especially if it is a mediterranean restaurant.

Rebecca Parker - Into English Ltd.
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:51
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: 'kleftiko' is a quite different dish that just happens (in your specific recipe) to be cooked using a similar method; but it's not the name of this method per se // Sure, of course! (maybe conf. 3 was a bit high...?)
25 mins
  -> arr, thanks for the clarification - I must say my idea was speculation anyway :)
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +5
cassolette lutée
"sealed"?


Explanation:
There are quite a few refernces on the Web to OTHER kinds of recipient being "luté(e)" (soupière, terrine, coquille, ...)

As far as I can see, it means "sealed down"; this might be referring to the kind of cooking technique where the lid of a casserole etc. is sealed to its base using (e.g.) a kind of dough, to make it airtight — a low-pressure version of a pressure-cooker, I suppose you might say.

I can only imagine that it means it is sealed down with some kind of lid — but I hasten to emphasize that I don't have any specific knowledge here, this is all pure conjecture!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 hrs (2007-02-28 10:02:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ronat is right, the word "cassolette" is often used pretty loosely; I would be inclined to translate it in some way, as I have usually found the term (for the item of crockery) is not well understood in general by English speakers, who are more likely to confuse it with the actual dish "cassoulet"!

It seems there is a tendency to use the term "cassolette" for a type of presentation (hot, in some kind of individual pottery container), rather than specifically the item of crockery.

Tony M
France
Local time: 18:51
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 362
Grading comment
I went with "sealed with a pastry lid" in the end, so ideally would have shared points between Tony and Alain. This was the first answer to mention the dough, though.
Notes to answerer
Asker:

Asker: I've just been looking at e.g. "cocotte lutee", and a lot of descriptions seem to use a sort of dough. I recently had soup in a restaurant in France which was served with a pastry "shell" over the top, but I can't remember what it was called, and they don't have a menu online. Some sites seem to keep the "cocotte lutee" in French, which may be the best bet as I don't know what is used for the seal here.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  msabeh: Maybe luted (sealed) cassolette. I am not sure of the term, but when it is "lutée" it has a sort of pie crust on top sealing it. See: http://agapes.canalblog.com/archives/2006/12/17/3430429.html
16 mins
  -> Thanks, msabeh! That's exactly the sort of thing I had in mind!

agree  roneill: with msabeh
38 mins
  -> Thanks, Ronat!

agree  Carol Gullidge: Brilliant guess (if it was a guess!) ragout de sanglier en cocotte lutee : Clore hermétiquement la terrine en la lutant. http://easy-cook.net/recette.php?id=sanglierlute
42 mins
  -> Thanks, Carol! Well, an educated one, perhaps... ;-)

agree  rousselures: Yes, sealed with dough!
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Rousselures!

agree  jean-jacques alexandre: Absolutely Tony, can se that you spend time in the kitchen. IT IS sealed, "luter" in gastro.lingo means to secure in an air tight manner the lid to the body of the casserole, usually with bread dough, tripes à la mode Caen are cooked this way, for 8 H !!
11 hrs
  -> I have a quicker recipe for "tripes": 1) Buy tripe at butcher's 2) Throw tripe immediately in dustbin! Merci, J-J !
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