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dos de truite

English translation: fillet of trout

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:dos de truite
English translation:fillet of trout
Entered by: PB Trans
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19:02 Mar 29, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / menu item
French term or phrase: dos de truite
Dos de truite poêlé, sauce vierge, écrasé de pois verts et citronnelle
PB Trans
Local time: 12:02
fillet of trout
Explanation:
We've had this before, I'm sure, it ought to be in the glossary somewhere.

It certainly means a fillet; some people seek to make the distinction with the fattest, central part of larger fish like cod etc., but that hardly seems applicable with anything as small as a trout!

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Note added at 12 mins (2007-03-29 19:14:39 GMT)
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Here's the previous KudoZ quesrtion I was thinking of:

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1310417

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Note added at 2 hrs (2007-03-29 21:32:13 GMT) Post-grading
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There are precious few Google hits for "trout loin", and by the time you've removed the rubbish, those that are left all seem to originate from about 3 source documents of slightly questionable provenance.

Although the term 'loin' may be strictly accurate in terms of official dictionary definitions, as I've said before, the word 'dos' is very commonly used in FR menus with a degree of pretentiousness and a marked lack of precision, and when I asked my catering lecturer friend, he confirmed for me that in 99% of cases, it is just used to mean 'a fillet of fish'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 234 days (2007-11-18 20:49:01 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

On my recent visit to the UK, I did notice that lots of the more pretentious restaurants did indeed use the term 'loin' for fish — though as their menus contained several erros and lots of other too-literal translations from the FR, I assume it's just because they've either started employing a FR chef (but can't yet afford a professional translator), or have just bought a pocket dictionary.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 13:02
Grading comment
Thanks... and sorry for not seeing the glossary entry when I did my search.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4fillet of trout
Tony M
4 +1Pour avancer le schmilblickxxxBourth
3 +2trout loinmfs_trad
2 +2Finest pan-fried trout
juliebarba


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
trout loin


Explanation:
http://ideasinfood.typepad.com/Notebooks/CreativityandSurpri...
Cook steelhead trout loin in nori sous vide for 12 minutes at 47 degrees C

mfs_trad
Portugal
Local time: 12:02
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: There's a syntax problem with that link, this one works: http://ideasinfood.typepad.com/Notebooks/CreativityandSurpri...
8 mins
  -> Thanks Tony

agree  xxxBourth: Yes, I think "loin" was the conclusion when someone asked about some other fish (dos de cabillaud?) some months back.
1 hr
  -> Thanks Bourth

agree  Thais Maria Lips
7 hrs
  -> Obrigada Thais
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Finest pan-fried trout


Explanation:
I think the 'dos' just refers to the best part - with the most on it....

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Note added at 8 mins (2007-03-29 19:10:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

dos: back, also refers to meatiest portion of fish
http://www.slowtrav.com/france/restaurants/glossary.htm#D


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Note added at 11 mins (2007-03-29 19:13:50 GMT)
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Dos Back; also the meatiest portion of fish
http://www.sanjeevkapoor.com/glossary/glossary.asp?glosid=4&...

juliebarba
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:02
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  French Foodie: exactly, the "dos" is the meatiest part, but the distinction is rarely made in English menus. Your solution works well, especially if a high-end restaurant
5 mins
  -> Thanks. Talking of high-end restaurants, I already came across this term myself ...and it was for two well respected French chefs with an expensive restaurant! they like dropping in the details like 'dos' for their quality!

agree  Istvan Nagy
13 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Pour avancer le schmilblick


Explanation:
Don't know if there really are any subtle differences between "dos" and "fillet", but since both French and English have two different words for it/them, why not use them?

Fillet
A name for a boneless piece of meat, poultry, or fish or the term used to refer to the process of preparing one section of meat, poultry or fish by removing the bones. The French version of this term spelled with one "l" is also used when referencing a cut of beef, such as filet mignon that is boneless.

Loin
The primal cut of an animal that contains the most tender and the leanest sub-primal and market ready cuts. The beef loin, which includes the short loin and the sirloin, is located between the rib and round, providing cuts such as the tenderloin, steaks, and roasts. The pork loin, which does not include the spareribs/belly, is located between the shoulder and the ham. It provides cuts such as the tenderloin, chops, ribs, roasts, and Canadian bacon. The loin of a lamb is located between the rib and the rear leg, providing cuts such as chops, roasts, medallions, noisettes and the "eye of the loin" (tenderloin). A veal loin is located behind the rack and breast, and before the leg. It provides cuts such as chops, tenderloins and roasts. The cuts from the loins of these animals are generally the best and most expensive cuts of meat.
http://www.recipetips.com/glossary-term/t--33411/loin.asp

Loin: The boneless portion of edible flesh cut lengthwise from either side of the backbone of a large, round-bodied fish.

Fillet: A slice of fish flesh of irregular size and shape which is removed from the carcass by a cut made parallel to the backbone, usually 2 to 12 oz. Some fillets, especially of fresh fish and those used to make up the larger frozen blocks, may be larger than 12 oz. However, for most institutional foodservice and home uses, frozen fish fillets over 12 oz. are not generally available. Special cut fillets are taken from solid large blocks; these include a "natural" cut fillet, wedge, rhombus or tail shape. Fillets may be skinless or have skin on; pinbones may or may not be removed.
http://www.aboutseafood.com/media/glossary.cfm

dos – back; saddle of rabbit or hare; the meatiest part of fish
filet de poisson – fillet of fish, cut lengthwise off the bone
[The A-Z of French Food, Scribo Editions]


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2007-03-29 21:06:35 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

An important distinction may be that a fillet needs to be filleted (have the bones removed) whereas a loin is naturally boneless.

xxxBourth
Local time: 13:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 88

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I think you're missing 2 key points: 1) a fillet is by definition the boneless bit you get when you take the flesh off the bones; 2) trout isn't really a 'large, round' fish, in any meaningful sense of the word (OK, technically, not a flat fish)
20 mins

agree  Istvan Nagy: thoughtful
11 hrs
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
fillet of trout


Explanation:
We've had this before, I'm sure, it ought to be in the glossary somewhere.

It certainly means a fillet; some people seek to make the distinction with the fattest, central part of larger fish like cod etc., but that hardly seems applicable with anything as small as a trout!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2007-03-29 19:14:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here's the previous KudoZ quesrtion I was thinking of:

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1310417

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2007-03-29 21:32:13 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

There are precious few Google hits for "trout loin", and by the time you've removed the rubbish, those that are left all seem to originate from about 3 source documents of slightly questionable provenance.

Although the term 'loin' may be strictly accurate in terms of official dictionary definitions, as I've said before, the word 'dos' is very commonly used in FR menus with a degree of pretentiousness and a marked lack of precision, and when I asked my catering lecturer friend, he confirmed for me that in 99% of cases, it is just used to mean 'a fillet of fish'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 234 days (2007-11-18 20:49:01 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

On my recent visit to the UK, I did notice that lots of the more pretentious restaurants did indeed use the term 'loin' for fish — though as their menus contained several erros and lots of other too-literal translations from the FR, I assume it's just because they've either started employing a FR chef (but can't yet afford a professional translator), or have just bought a pocket dictionary.

Tony M
France
Local time: 13:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 382
Grading comment
Thanks... and sorry for not seeing the glossary entry when I did my search.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  French Foodie: Agree that it is generally the meatiest part of the fish, but I think simply fillet will do in this case
2 mins
  -> Thanks, Mara! Yes, indeed.

agree  Claire Cox
4 mins
  -> Thanks, Claire!

agree  Noni Gilbert: Quite!
14 hrs
  -> Thanks, aceavila!

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
16 hrs
  -> Efharisto, Vicky!
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