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Une petite coloration des chicons leur va très bien.

English translation: The xxxxx will benefit from being allowed to colour very slightly

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07:11 Oct 27, 2007
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / Recipe
French term or phrase: Une petite coloration des chicons leur va très bien.
Laisser cuire à feu moyen en surveillant. Une petite coloration des chicons leur va très bien.
Valosh
English translation:The xxxxx will benefit from being allowed to colour very slightly
Explanation:
...where xxxx = chicons

Now what that actually means will depend on where the document is from, and where it's headed!

According to my trusty R+C, chicons is cos (lettuce) [BE] / romaine [AE] if it is used in France, but if the expression hails from Belgium, then it means chicory [BE] / endive [AE]

Now although I know some chefs do indeed cook lettuce, the fact that 'chicons' is being used as a countable noun here suggests to me that this might be the Belgian usage of 'chicory' (i.e. the vegetable, known as 'endive' in FR and the US!) rather than the salad leaf 'endive' (known as 'chicorée' in FR)

As for what you call all these things in Australian EN, I'm afraid I haven't a clue!
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 18:12
Grading comment
Merci Tony!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2Allowing the chicons to brown slightly will enhance their appearanceMoiraB
4 +2The xxxxx will benefit from being allowed to colour very slightly
Tony M


  

Answers


22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
The xxxxx will benefit from being allowed to colour very slightly


Explanation:
...where xxxx = chicons

Now what that actually means will depend on where the document is from, and where it's headed!

According to my trusty R+C, chicons is cos (lettuce) [BE] / romaine [AE] if it is used in France, but if the expression hails from Belgium, then it means chicory [BE] / endive [AE]

Now although I know some chefs do indeed cook lettuce, the fact that 'chicons' is being used as a countable noun here suggests to me that this might be the Belgian usage of 'chicory' (i.e. the vegetable, known as 'endive' in FR and the US!) rather than the salad leaf 'endive' (known as 'chicorée' in FR)

As for what you call all these things in Australian EN, I'm afraid I haven't a clue!


Tony M
France
Local time: 18:12
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 382
Grading comment
Merci Tony!!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Hi Tony, yes it is indeed a Belgian recipe, and it has to be translated for an Australian chef, so I shall use the term 'witlof' for 'chicon'! Thank you for your help!!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  nordiste: chicons = endives in usual (BE & North of France) French , i.d. chicory in UK English
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Nordiste! That's very helpful.

agree  Melissa McMahon
1 day1 hr
  -> Merci, Melissa !
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Allowing the chicons to brown slightly will enhance their appearance


Explanation:
or possibly ...the appearance of the final dish / ...will make the final dish more attractive (since that's the ultimate objective). Same reservations about 'chicons' as Tony, but my first thought was that this referred to chicory/chicory heads.

MoiraB
France
Local time: 18:12
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 40
Notes to answerer
Asker: Hi Moira, yes it is the Belgian endive which in Aussie English=witlof!! Thank you very much for your help!

Asker: Went with Tony for the points but liked your option just as much! Thanks Moira!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: In the UK they are called called chicory, US is Belgian endives. Had a long discussion about them the other day with a UK colleague. they are usually served just lightly browned-especially in the baked dish with ham, mashed and bechamel sauce
40 mins
  -> yum. Chicon is just a posh word for chicory head, but chicory would do just as well here, or witlof as asker points out. Tricky vegetable when it comes to naming it!

agree  jean-jacques alexandre
22 hrs

neutral  Melissa McMahon: I think the browning could be as much about improving the flavor as the appearance...
23 hrs
  -> '..appearance and flavour' then to cover all bases. You're a tough lot to please ;-)
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