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thon émietté

English translation: shredded or grated tuna

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02:33 Nov 8, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / canned tuna
French term or phrase: thon émietté
In a Quebecois food encyclopedia, in a section dealing with tuna, and, here, canned tuna:

"Le thon en conserve peut être entier, en morceaux, en flocons ou **émietté**. Il peut baigner dans de l’huile végétale, du bouillon ou de l’eau.
Le **thon émietté** est souvent moins coûteux, mais c’est aussi la préparation dans laquelle on trouve le plus de débris de peau et d’arêtes."

I gave "thon émietté" as "tuna chunks" - because it seemed to me that "flaked tuna" would be the tuna "en flocons" and that tuna "en morceaux" might be tuna pieces (eg. canned slices) - but I have been asked to re-check. It's true I wouldn't have thought you'd find bits of skin and bone in tuna chunks, but I'm at a loss as to what else it would be.

Nb. this is for a US/North American audience.

Thanks for any suggestions.
Melissa McMahon
Australia
Local time: 18:25
English translation:shredded or grated tuna
Explanation:
if there is bits of skin and bone, it is shredded or grated. Chunks refers to "en morceaux"

following document describes differnt forms of canned tuna
www.codexalimentarius.net/download/standards/105/CXS_070e.p...

I hope this helps
Selected response from:

xxxRichard Piet
Local time: 10:25
Grading comment
I think "flaked tuna" would in most cases be a correct translation for "thon emietté", but here I believe they are making a distinction and that in a list of descending quality "whole, chunks, flakes...", "shredded" is next in line. The link here was v. helpful. Thanks Richard & to everyone else.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +13flaked tunaBrigitte Albert
4 +1shredded or grated tunaxxxRichard Piet
4tuna chunks
Ingeborg Gowans
3chunk light tunalindugs
2crumbled tuna
Rachel Fell


  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
tuna chunks


Explanation:
as I am living in Canada, all food products are marked in French and English and this would be the right term
as you suggested yourself

Ingeborg Gowans
Canada
Local time: 05:25
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Nina Iordache: Flaked is not the same with Chunks as I can see in the can when I buy it.
6 hrs
  -> s, my mistake. I should know, I buy it all the time

neutral  Tony M: You would be very disappointed if your bought émietté and found it was little tiny pieces instead of nice chunks
7 hrs
  -> yes indeed, one of those "mssed opportunities; I should have known better :((
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
chunk light tuna


Explanation:
that's the worst quality in tuna (besided the cat food stuff).
better is 'chunk white albacore', and best is 'solid white tuna'
at least, in the supermarket i go to.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2007-11-08 02:50:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

in the united states

lindugs
Local time: 04:25
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Not a term you would find in the UK
7 hrs
  -> the asker sets the context in North America. "flaked tuna" in the US is associated with cat food.
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
shredded or grated tuna


Explanation:
if there is bits of skin and bone, it is shredded or grated. Chunks refers to "en morceaux"

following document describes differnt forms of canned tuna
www.codexalimentarius.net/download/standards/105/CXS_070e.p...

I hope this helps

xxxRichard Piet
Local time: 10:25
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
I think "flaked tuna" would in most cases be a correct translation for "thon emietté", but here I believe they are making a distinction and that in a list of descending quality "whole, chunks, flakes...", "shredded" is next in line. The link here was v. helpful. Thanks Richard & to everyone else.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Although i've never actually seen the expression on a food label, the description given of 'shredded tuna' corresponds well to the product I know; I would avoid 'grated'
7 hrs
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +13
flaked tuna


Explanation:
1. Subject Field(s)
Food Preservation and Canning
Food Industries (General)
Subject Field(s)
Conservation des aliments et conserverie
Industrie de l'alimentation (Généralités)


canned flaked tuna Source, record 1, canned flaked tuna thon émietté en conserve Source, record 1, thon émietté en conserve
MASC

miettes de thon en conserve Source, record 1, miettes de thon en conserve
TRANSL. SOURCE, FEM, PLUR


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2007-11-08 04:43:18 GMT)
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Here's a recipe from the following bilingual website: www.saveursdumonde.net/?action=recette_show&id=1414&lg=fr - 25k -

A recipe from the Mexican region of Tampico

Ingredients
• 2 large avocados
• 1 small can of flaked tuna
• 1/4 onion, finely chopped
• 1 hardboiled egg, sliced
• 60-100 ml (4-6 tbsp.) mayonnaise
• 1 small stalk of celery
• 1 lime
• Salt and pepper to taste

2 gros avocats
• 1 petite boîte de thon en flocons
• 1/4 d'oignon haché fin
• 1 oeuf cuit dur tranché
• 60 - 100 ml de mayonnaise
• 1 petite branche de céleri
• 1 citron vert
• sel et poivre au goût

It might be that "flaked tuna" is translated by both "en flocons" and "émietté."


Brigitte Albert
Local time: 04:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
Notes to answerer
Asker: Would "thon en flocons" also be "flaked tuna" do you think?


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  sporran: definitely for Canada - just checked in my cupboard:-)
12 mins
  -> Thanks sporran! ...yes I see it on cans of tuna here in Québec.

agree  Gabrielle Bannard: It is my opinion that "thon en flocons" might be more a term used in Quebec for "flaked tuna", and that "emiette" is used more generally (miette = crumb). In addition, I can attest to bits of bones and skin in flaked tuna!
1 hr
  -> Thanks, AWOE! I can't say that I have often seen 'en flocons' on the tins in the supermarket...rather émietté.

agree  Mark Nathan
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Mark!

agree  jean-jacques alexandre
5 hrs
  -> Merci, JJA!

agree  Nina Iordache: Absolutely!
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Nina!

agree  Penny Slacke: Better late than never!? Have just come to this, Termium, Quebecois database, gives "flaked tuna"
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Penny. I quote Termium in my answer. :-)

agree  Tony M: Yes, this is what I would naturally have called it, comparing food labels; I think 'flocons' amounts to the same thing, I'm suprised they're trying to make a distinction between them
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Tony M!

agree  EJP
7 hrs
  -> Thanks EJP!

agree  Kari Foster
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Kari!

agree  Miranda Joubioux
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Miranda!

agree  Amy Cheshire
9 hrs
  -> Thanks, Amy!

agree  Johanne Benoit-Gallagher: Yes, I am in Quebec and that is what I have in my cupboard.
10 hrs
  -> Merci, Johanne, moi aussi, j'ai ça dans mon garde-manger!

disagree  lindugs: in the US, "flaked tuna" is cat food stuff. there are only 3 kinds: chunk light, chunk white and solid white. again in the US.
11 hrs
  -> Thanks lindugs! Perhaps the "flaked" is simply not used in the States, but in Québec and, as far as I have seen, in the rest of Canada the term is common.

agree  PB Trans: "en flocons" and "émietté" are used interchangeably. This is what the writer meant by the "ou" between the two terms. See note above for refs. The translation would simply be "flaked" for both terms, written once..
17 hrs
  -> Thanks, Pina!

agree  Lany Chabot-Laroche
27 days
  -> Thanks, Lany!
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
crumbled tuna


Explanation:
could be this if it's as opposed to "en flocons", but low conf. as I don't think I've seen it in tins as crumbled tuna - it's what you often do to drained tinned tuna when mixing it with other stuff

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:25
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 80

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Quite, I agree that's what you do to it, but I have never seen this on a food tin either.
10 mins
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