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Moelleux

English translation: Melt-in-your-mouth (chocolate, pistachio, lemon) cake

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07:54 Apr 27, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / Menu item (dessert)
French term or phrase: Moelleux
Whenever this has appeared I have left in the original French as I don't think it translates. However the client is insisting on everything being translated, so rather than 'cream', which I think is a bit tame, are there any suggestions? Examples of its use here are: Moelleux au citron , Moelleux: Chocolat, framboise & pistache
janisct
Local time: 03:20
English translation:Melt-in-your-mouth (chocolate, pistachio, lemon) cake
Explanation:
This is one of those difficult words.
A possible way of dealing with it would be to use "melt-in-your-mouth"
However, without actually knowing what the consistency of the centre of the cake is, whether it's a large cake cut into portions or a single "cup cake" type, it is hard to come up with something coherent.
When I see Moelleux: chocolat, framboise pistache I'm very wary.
It could well be a molten chocolat cake, served with framboises and pistaches for decoration. I often see things like this coming from top class chefs. They don't actually realize that it doesn't really describe the dessert.
If it's a portion of a larger cake its generally a chocolate/lemon fondant cake, but I'm not sure about pistachio or raspberry.

To cover all possibilities without knowing exactly how it's made, I would use "melt-in-the-mouth".
This has already been discussed in the past here.
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/french_to_english/cooking_culinary...
This might help you make your decision.
Selected response from:

Miranda Joubioux
Local time: 04:20
Grading comment
Thank you for this. Your suggestion is very helpful and conveys the idea well.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4Molten (chocolate cake).
Gad Kohenov
4 +1moist sponge cake
Emma Cypher-Dournes
3 +1Melt-in-your-mouth (chocolate, pistachio, lemon) cake
Miranda Joubioux
3 -2mousse
Victoria Burns


Discussion entries: 9





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -2
mousse


Explanation:
Just a suggestion to get the ball rolling. From the context and menu items you give, it sounds like it may be simply a mousse - lemon and chocolate are, after all, common flavours for this. HTH

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Note added at 3 mins (2008-04-27 07:58:34 GMT)
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Maybe even 'foam', depending on the consistency. (I was watching a culinary programme about this sort of thing last night).

Victoria Burns
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Yes tony, I think from all the responses there have been we can now discount mousse, although I do see why Victoria thought it was a possibility. Thanks to Victoria anyway for the suggestion!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  B D Finch: No, a moelleux is one of those dreadfully bad for me, philosophically unsound, tooth-rotting, irresistible, yummy cakes with a gooey liquid centre (even better served warm).
4 hrs
  -> There was very little context to suggest exactly what this dessert was like. I have ordered 'moelleux' several times in France and got something slightly different every time.

disagree  Tony M: 'mousse' would very inaccurately describe this type of dessert / "slightly different", maybe — but the basic concept of a 'moelleux' is very different from a 'mousse' — to start with, it is cooked!
1 day12 hrs
  -> see comments above
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
moist sponge cake


Explanation:
If I see Moelleux on a menu, I expect to receive a moist sponge cake, with a gooey liquid centre (yum!)
(try typing Moelleux au chocolat into google and clicking on "images")

Emma Cypher-Dournes
Spain
Local time: 04:20
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 7
Notes to answerer
Asker: This is what I would call 'Squidgy chocolate cake', but not here as we have various flavours (see my original question)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christine Schmit
8 mins
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Molten (chocolate cake).


Explanation:
This appeared already in a question about Moelleux de chocolat.
Here is another option, describing a chocolate cake with a softer, or sometimes even liquid chocolate centre.

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Note added at 19 mins (2007-11-24 15:08:41 GMT)
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This first link even has an excellent picture of a moelleux.

Chez Mégane: An Early Valentine!
I’d been having a craving for one of those delicious molten chocolate cakes we ordered so often when we lived in Paris . Les moelleux au chocolat are ...
chezmegane.blogspot.com/2007/02/early-valentine.html - 83k - Cached - Similar pages

Petrossian: Moelleux au Chocolat->Chocolates & Candies
this ultra moist little cake with the soft "sunken" center is served warm, its velvety molten chocolate flowing seductively onto the plate with your first ...
www.petrossian.com/Chocolates-Candies-7-Moelleux-au-Chocola... - 39k - Cached - Similar pages

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Note added at 1 hr (2007-11-24 16:39:57 GMT)
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I'm adding these links, not to tout my own answer, because I think several of the others proposed will do, but simply to show that it is not an invention on my part, and that 'molten' is widely used by reputable sources to describe this dessert. The first two links show a picture, which is precisely what a moelleux is in France.

Molten Chocolate Cakes Recipe & Photo - Joyofbaking.com
This recipe is definitely for the chocolate lover. Each individual chocolate cake is unmolded directly from the oven onto a serving plate and nothing else ...
www.joyofbaking.com/MoltenChocolateCakes.html - 35k - Cached - Similar pages
Welcome to NESTLE CHOCOLATIER : Recipe : Molten Chocolate Cakes
NOTES: Learn more about how NESTLÉ CHOCOLATIER™ can enhance your recipes · Click here to view a step-by-step video for Molten Chocolate Cake. ...
www.verybestbaking.com/products/chocolatier/recipes/detail.... - 30k - Cached - Similar pages
Molten chocolate cake - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Molten chocolate cake is a popular dessert that combines the elements of a flourless chocolate cake (sometimes called a "chocolate decadence cake") and a ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molten_chocolate_cake - 16k - Cached - Similar pages
Molten Chocolate Cake Recipe: Recipes: Food Network
Enjoy this Molten Chocolate Cake recipe from Sweet Dreams.
www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_16615,... - 80k - Cached - Similar pages

Actually, the wiki site also refers to it as "chocolate decadence", which I think sounds pretty nice, too :-)

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Note added at 2 hrs (2008-04-27 09:55:57 GMT)
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For Lemon you have this:

Molten lemon cake cups « got no milk
Molten lemon cake cups. January 20, 2008 by kitchenetta. lemon-souffle-pudding2.jpg.
With winter upon us, it’s time to make fruit of the season desserts. ...
gotnomilk.wordpress.com/2008/01/20/molten-lemon-cake-cups/ - 33k - Similar pages

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Note added at 2 hrs (2008-04-27 09:57:44 GMT)
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For raspberry molten cakes:

McCormick Recipes - Easy Raspberry Molten Cakes - Dessert
Easy Raspberry Molten Cakes Rating 5 Reviews: Read the Reviews Make this restaurant
favorite at home. It's made even more decadently delicious with a hint ...
www.mccormick.com/recipedetail.cfm?id=11876 - 38k - Similar pages


Gad Kohenov
Israel
Local time: 05:20
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in HebrewHebrew
Notes to answerer
Asker: Only for the chocolate version, but what about the others?

Asker: Chocolate decadence has alovely ring to it!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  emiledgar: for m de chocolat, yes.
1 hr
  -> Merci beaucoup!

agree  Emma Cypher-Dournes: I prefer this answer to my own! Molten perfectly describes the runny middle which characterises a moelleux. I would use this answer.
1 hr
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  sueaberwoman: Molten lemon cake turns up ghits, too. As does lava cake.
2 hrs
  -> Many thanks!

neutral  juliebarba: of course this fits in some cases, although if you look on the net you'll see that it can also just be a sponge cake
3 hrs

agree  PB Trans: Ok for chocolate. Too bad the asker did not provide enough context for raspberry and pistachio and has now closed the question without grading.
5 hrs

neutral  Tony M: Tha really describes a 'coulant' = with a runny centre.
3336 days
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1 day1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Melt-in-your-mouth (chocolate, pistachio, lemon) cake


Explanation:
This is one of those difficult words.
A possible way of dealing with it would be to use "melt-in-your-mouth"
However, without actually knowing what the consistency of the centre of the cake is, whether it's a large cake cut into portions or a single "cup cake" type, it is hard to come up with something coherent.
When I see Moelleux: chocolat, framboise pistache I'm very wary.
It could well be a molten chocolat cake, served with framboises and pistaches for decoration. I often see things like this coming from top class chefs. They don't actually realize that it doesn't really describe the dessert.
If it's a portion of a larger cake its generally a chocolate/lemon fondant cake, but I'm not sure about pistachio or raspberry.

To cover all possibilities without knowing exactly how it's made, I would use "melt-in-the-mouth".
This has already been discussed in the past here.
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/french_to_english/cooking_culinary...
This might help you make your decision.


Miranda Joubioux
Local time: 04:20
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
Thank you for this. Your suggestion is very helpful and conveys the idea well.
Notes to answerer
Asker: I looked up the link you mentioned and quite liked someone's suggestion 'gooey' but perhaps it's a little colloquial for what I needed.

Asker: Contrary to Ms Broccoli's jibe, I DID look it up in the glossary first but as there was more than chocolate involved I was looking for more suggestions, for which I thank you Miranda.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  PB Trans: Asker's question wasn't clear; apparently it's not all one dessert. Your suggestion of melt-in-your-mouth cake is a good one although the asker could have found it in the Kudoz glossary if she had bothered to look it up before asking.
1 hr
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