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rompre

English translation: punch down or knock back

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06:26 Jul 5, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
French term or phrase: rompre
* Au début du pétrissage, faire tourner la cuve à l'envers pendant 1 min30,
* Temps de pétrissage : 10 min
* Débaquer
* Laisser un pointage de 4 heures.
* Rompre 3 fois à l'eau ( une fois toutes les heures).
pmcd
France
Local time: 10:33
English translation:punch down or knock back
Explanation:
http://urchin.earth.li/~aendr/recipes/glossary.html

Knock Back (also known as punching down)

This refers to lightly kneading bread dough after it is part risen. It is done after the first rising and before the bread dough is shaped, separated into smaller amounts or put into the tin it will be baked in. Usually there is a longer first rising before knocking back the dough, dividing and a shorter second rising. With some yeasts and recipes, there is only one rising and no knocking back. The process of knocking back is usually to stick your fist into the risen dough, so that it collapses. Then knead for about a minute until all the cold surfaces have gone and the dough feels a uniform temperature.

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1216/is_n1_v192/ai_14...

Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn over to oil top, and cover with plastic wrap. Let rise at 70 |degrees~ to 75 |degrees~ until doubled, 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 hours. Punch down and knead briefly on a lightly floured board to expel air. Repeat rising in oiled bowl until doubled, 1 to 1 1/4 hours. Punch down dough and knead briefly.
http://www.cookadvice.com/recipes/doahead_refrigerator_bread...

2. Add water, ¼ cup oil and the egg. Beat on low speed, scraping bowl constantly, 30 seconds; beat on medium speed, scraping bowl occasionally, 2 minutes.
3. Gradually stir in enough remaining flour to make dough easy to handle.
4. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, 8 to 10 minutes.
5. Place in greased bowl; turn greased side up. **Cover and let rise in warm place until double, about 1 hour.
6. (Doughi is ready if indentation remains when touched.
7. ) Punch down dough; divide into halves.



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Note added at 5 hrs (2008-07-05 12:19:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hello Tony. I know what you are saying but in this recipe it says to punch down on 2 separate occasions, in between leaving it for periods of 1 hr to 1hr 30m:

http://fr.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=2008042915422...

Débarrasser dans un récipient. Couvrir et laisser pousser à 25 - 30°C pendant 1 heure. Rompre la pâte et passer au froid 1 heure. Laisser pousser à nouveau 1 h 30 et rompre à nouveau. Passer au froid 1 heure

10 La pâte à brioche est prête à être utilisée.

11 Mouler dans un moule à brioche beurré.

12 Laisser pointer à nouveau 1 h 30 à 2 heures.

The water bit has me puzzled, but I don't see why you can't moisten it (as you suggest) when punching down...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2008-07-05 12:42:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Recipes that mention the two elements, water and kneading/punching:

http://www.astray.com/recipes/?show=Potato-rye bread with ca...

...(It helps to moisten your hands while you knead.) ... Punch down dough and knead lightly to press out air.

http://www.recipe-ideas.co.uk/recipes-1/About Bagels -- Gene...

Bagel dough should be stiff but elastic; if it's
too stiff, sprinkle a little water on it or moisten your hands and
knead the moisture into dough.

There are more references to kneading and moistening than punching down and moistening, unfortunately, but perhaps the two are more interchangeable than I realise...
Selected response from:

Vicky James
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:33
Grading comment
Many thanks for all your research.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1punch down or knock back
Vicky James
4knock downliz cencetti
1moisten
Tony M


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
knock down


Explanation:
The dough is first left to rise, then it is 'knocked down', ie all the air is punched out, and then it is left to rise again, or 'prove'. The second rising is said to be more even.

liz cencetti
Local time: 10:33
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ghyslaine LE NAGARD: How do you punch the air out using water ?
6 mins
  -> Good question! Google has no hits for "rompre à l'eau".
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47 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
punch down or knock back


Explanation:
http://urchin.earth.li/~aendr/recipes/glossary.html

Knock Back (also known as punching down)

This refers to lightly kneading bread dough after it is part risen. It is done after the first rising and before the bread dough is shaped, separated into smaller amounts or put into the tin it will be baked in. Usually there is a longer first rising before knocking back the dough, dividing and a shorter second rising. With some yeasts and recipes, there is only one rising and no knocking back. The process of knocking back is usually to stick your fist into the risen dough, so that it collapses. Then knead for about a minute until all the cold surfaces have gone and the dough feels a uniform temperature.

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1216/is_n1_v192/ai_14...

Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn over to oil top, and cover with plastic wrap. Let rise at 70 |degrees~ to 75 |degrees~ until doubled, 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 hours. Punch down and knead briefly on a lightly floured board to expel air. Repeat rising in oiled bowl until doubled, 1 to 1 1/4 hours. Punch down dough and knead briefly.
http://www.cookadvice.com/recipes/doahead_refrigerator_bread...

2. Add water, ¼ cup oil and the egg. Beat on low speed, scraping bowl constantly, 30 seconds; beat on medium speed, scraping bowl occasionally, 2 minutes.
3. Gradually stir in enough remaining flour to make dough easy to handle.
4. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, 8 to 10 minutes.
5. Place in greased bowl; turn greased side up. **Cover and let rise in warm place until double, about 1 hour.
6. (Doughi is ready if indentation remains when touched.
7. ) Punch down dough; divide into halves.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2008-07-05 12:19:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hello Tony. I know what you are saying but in this recipe it says to punch down on 2 separate occasions, in between leaving it for periods of 1 hr to 1hr 30m:

http://fr.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=2008042915422...

Débarrasser dans un récipient. Couvrir et laisser pousser à 25 - 30°C pendant 1 heure. Rompre la pâte et passer au froid 1 heure. Laisser pousser à nouveau 1 h 30 et rompre à nouveau. Passer au froid 1 heure

10 La pâte à brioche est prête à être utilisée.

11 Mouler dans un moule à brioche beurré.

12 Laisser pointer à nouveau 1 h 30 à 2 heures.

The water bit has me puzzled, but I don't see why you can't moisten it (as you suggest) when punching down...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2008-07-05 12:42:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Recipes that mention the two elements, water and kneading/punching:

http://www.astray.com/recipes/?show=Potato-rye bread with ca...

...(It helps to moisten your hands while you knead.) ... Punch down dough and knead lightly to press out air.

http://www.recipe-ideas.co.uk/recipes-1/About Bagels -- Gene...

Bagel dough should be stiff but elastic; if it's
too stiff, sprinkle a little water on it or moisten your hands and
knead the moisture into dough.

There are more references to kneading and moistening than punching down and moistening, unfortunately, but perhaps the two are more interchangeable than I realise...

Vicky James
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Many thanks for all your research.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Fair enough, in the light of your extra information, I think you must be right; the 'eau' bit still has me rather puzzled, but I suppose you might re-moisten it slightly, or even just wet hands...?
11 mins
  -> see note added
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
rompre à l'eau
moisten


Explanation:
This really is a pure guess, and I don't quite see how one would get there, linguistically-speaking, but I wonder if it doesn't mean 'moisten the surface of the dough' (perhaps with a spray-gun, for example) — to stop it forming a crust during this rather long rising period. You know, usually they tell us to 'cover with a damp teatowel', but in what seems to be like an industrial situation, that is probably not feasible!



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2008-07-05 12:41:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It certainly does mean 'to knock back / punch down' — see for example this recipe:

http://www.supertoinette.com/recettes/pain_baveux_sorciere_t...

"...Notre première levée s'est bien passée...

Votre pâte a bien levée. Rompre la pâte, c'est à dire l'aplatir...."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2008-07-05 12:45:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here's a somewhat more authoritative deinfition from a professional bakery site:

http://www.boulangerie.net/boulbn/Infospainmot.html

Rompre : ou DONNER UN TOUR. Action qui consiste à travailler légèrement une pâte au cours du pointage pour lui redonner une certaine activité à la fermentation et une certaine cohésion Ceci a pour but de donner de la force à la pâte.

As for 'à l'eau', all I can think of is that you usually flour your hands to do it, but perhaps for this particular dough, you are meant to wet your hands instead?

Tony M
France
Local time: 10:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 382

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxCMJ_Trans: could it be "sprinkle with water"?
9 mins
  -> Thanks for your support, but as it turns out, further research seems to disprove my theory.
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