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associations externes

English translation: external links/connections

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:associations externes
English translation:external links/connections
Entered by: David Goward
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09:28 Oct 31, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Electronics / Elect Eng / Transformers
French term or phrase: associations externes
This is from a spec for a planar transformer.

The transformer "est destiné aux convertisseurs de type Flyback 28V/33V et 115V/33V (les rapports de transformation 1:1 et 3:1 étant obtenus par associations externes, des enroulements primaires et secondaires)".

The comma after "externes" is in the original but I don't think it should be there.

I'd be grateful for a quick explanation of these "associations externes" and if it is indeed the primary and secondary windings that are "externally associated" (if that makes sense).
David Goward
France
Local time: 05:40
external links
Explanation:
I don't have specific experience of planar transformers, but in general transformer terms, you achieve different step up / down ratios by linking the multi-section windings in different configurations; for example, a transformer with 2 secondary and 2 primary windings with a basic ratio of 1:1 could be used as 2:1 step down, 1:2 step up, or 1:1 with either higher voltage (both secondary and both primary windings in series), or higher current capacity (both windings in parallel)

So you might have, say, a mains transformer with 2 prim. and 2 sec. windings, enabling you to use it on 120 or 240 V, and producing 12, 24, or 48 V outputs with varying current capacities.

Of course this isn't exhaustive ut I hope it gives you a bit of an idea.

For the sake of completeness, I suppose I ought to just add that the transofrmer is (usually) manufactured with the windings entirely separate, i.e. all brought out to external connections, so that these can be linked in the appropriate way to achieve the desired ratios.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 47 mins (2006-10-31 10:16:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In aswer to the second part of your question: no, logically, that comma isn't really needed; and the selection of ratios is more to do with the way the primary and secondary windings are configured EACH ON THEIR OWN SIDE, i.e. NOT across between primary and secondary... as I hope I've explained above!
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 05:40
Grading comment
This is one of those cases where a "split the points" function would be useful!
Thanks to you both!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1external links
Tony M
3 +1external connections
a05


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
external connections


Explanation:
Windings on both the primary and secondary of power transformers may have external connections (called taps) to intermediate points on the winding to allow adjustment of the voltage ratio.




    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secondary_Coil
a05
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, though in the present case we are probably not talking as much about TAPPED windings as actual separate ones; but that's only a pedantic nicety!
30 mins
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
external links


Explanation:
I don't have specific experience of planar transformers, but in general transformer terms, you achieve different step up / down ratios by linking the multi-section windings in different configurations; for example, a transformer with 2 secondary and 2 primary windings with a basic ratio of 1:1 could be used as 2:1 step down, 1:2 step up, or 1:1 with either higher voltage (both secondary and both primary windings in series), or higher current capacity (both windings in parallel)

So you might have, say, a mains transformer with 2 prim. and 2 sec. windings, enabling you to use it on 120 or 240 V, and producing 12, 24, or 48 V outputs with varying current capacities.

Of course this isn't exhaustive ut I hope it gives you a bit of an idea.

For the sake of completeness, I suppose I ought to just add that the transofrmer is (usually) manufactured with the windings entirely separate, i.e. all brought out to external connections, so that these can be linked in the appropriate way to achieve the desired ratios.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 47 mins (2006-10-31 10:16:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In aswer to the second part of your question: no, logically, that comma isn't really needed; and the selection of ratios is more to do with the way the primary and secondary windings are configured EACH ON THEIR OWN SIDE, i.e. NOT across between primary and secondary... as I hope I've explained above!

Tony M
France
Local time: 05:40
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1915
Grading comment
This is one of those cases where a "split the points" function would be useful!
Thanks to you both!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  a05: may they be similar in function to jumpers in computer cards?
19 mins
  -> Thanks! Certainly, in a way, theough they are likely to take a different physical form... Usually, more permanent: the way the PCB is designed, for example, or flying leads... (etc., etc.)
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