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partim

English translation: partim (DO NOT TRANSLATE)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:partim
English translation:partim (DO NOT TRANSLATE)
Entered by: silviantonia
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15:01 Feb 13, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Electronics / Elect Eng
French term or phrase: partim
This translation has to do with laminar flow; I am translating a title which says:

Guideline for laminar flow - étanchéité partim and absolute filters

Watertight sections? watertight parts? Thank you in advance!
silviantonia
United States
Local time: 12:57
partim (TRANSLATE AS IS)
Explanation:
It doesn't seem to mean completely water-tight . Anyways, I found some university websites that mention it.

this one is from Antwerp "The role of water in crop production and management concepts is very complex. We must deal with a dynamic set of circumstances, crop requirements, climatic variables, soil characteristics, water resources variables and restrictions, irrigation lay-out and design restrictions, which all influence actual irrigation practice and in fact water use efficiency. The goal of partim "Soil Water Management" is to focus on the need for more efficient use of water in irrigated as well as in rainfed agriculture and the methodologies involved. In partim "Soil Salinity Management" the problems of actual and potential salinity and sodicity, combined with their management and reclamation, are described and discussed."
Selected response from:

Max Berre
Local time: 15:57
Grading comment
I chose partim because I have a lawyer's fondness for Latin... in the US we sprinkle our legal pleadings with Latin terminology, and we are always boringly Latinate, ad infinitum and probably ad nauseam...

Thank you for your input!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +1in part / partialCharles Hawtrey
3 -1partim (TRANSLATE AS IS)
Max Berre


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
partim (TRANSLATE AS IS)


Explanation:
It doesn't seem to mean completely water-tight . Anyways, I found some university websites that mention it.

this one is from Antwerp "The role of water in crop production and management concepts is very complex. We must deal with a dynamic set of circumstances, crop requirements, climatic variables, soil characteristics, water resources variables and restrictions, irrigation lay-out and design restrictions, which all influence actual irrigation practice and in fact water use efficiency. The goal of partim "Soil Water Management" is to focus on the need for more efficient use of water in irrigated as well as in rainfed agriculture and the methodologies involved. In partim "Soil Salinity Management" the problems of actual and potential salinity and sodicity, combined with their management and reclamation, are described and discussed."


    Reference: http://www.opleidingen.ugent.be/studiegids/2006/NL/FACULTY/L...
Max Berre
Local time: 15:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
I chose partim because I have a lawyer's fondness for Latin... in the US we sprinkle our legal pleadings with Latin terminology, and we are always boringly Latinate, ad infinitum and probably ad nauseam...

Thank you for your input!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: Looks suspiciously like a Belgian-ism, but I don't think it is widely accepted in EN, and so OUGHT to be translated, not merely left "as is"!
20 mins
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56 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
in part / partial


Explanation:
From a dictionary called The Phrontistery - A Dictionary of Obscure Words http://phrontistery.info/ (EN > EN).
The title doesn't make it clear which language the word is in, but English seems likely.
Partim certainly seems to be a Latin word (ref. Lewis & Short) which could be used in English phrases in some contexts.

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Note added at 1 day32 mins (2007-02-14 15:34:19 GMT)
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Many of the ghits that come through imply partially in the few lines given - but could also possibly be read to mean mostly, mainly, above all, etc. as Olga says. The on-line Lewis & Short (Perseus project at University of Chicago) is unavailable. I don't have a personal copy.

Charles Hawtrey
Local time: 20:57
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 71
Notes to answerer
Asker: I have a fondness for the Latin term... only reason I chose to leave as is. Thank you for your most excellent answer and links.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Olga Cartlidge: I would go for "in part" but the latin - french dictionary I use quite often gives two meanings: 1- en partie. - 2 - pour la plupart, notamment, principalement, surtout. - http://perso.orange.fr/prima.elementa/Dico-p01.html
4 hrs
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