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serré à butée

English translation: fully tightened

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:serré à butée
English translation:fully tightened
Entered by: silviantonia
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19:26 Feb 13, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Electronics / Elect Eng
French term or phrase: serré à butée
La distance entre le plan de joint et la patte de fixation lorsque cette dernière est "serrée à butée" doit être de :
69 +/- 0,5 mm pour les filtres de 66 mm d’épaisseur


As always, thank you in advance!
silviantonia
United States
Local time: 11:18
"fully tightened"
Explanation:
I would keep the inveretd commas, to indicate as in FR that this is not "brute force and ignorance" tight, but based on a specific criterion (i.e. the measurement)

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Note added at 45 mins (2007-02-13 20:11:51 GMT)
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"inverted commas" — sorry!

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Note added at 4 hrs (2007-02-14 00:24:26 GMT)
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If you tighten something to a specific torque, you can't say where it will end up; here, the criterion being used is quite clearly NOT a set torque, but a final distance measurement.

IOW, quite a range of torque might need to be used, but that isn't important; what matters is SOLELY the end position of the unit.

But it is more important not to lose sight of the fact that the original FR is in quotes, and basically means "tightened till it won't go any further", which does not imply either tightening only to a set otruqe, or anything else! IMHO, it is VITAL to retain the quotes for the EN translation, to convey exactly the same sense.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 20:18
Grading comment
I chose this answer because it comported with my understanding of the terminology; I had thought of 'tightening to the limit' which is ultimately similar to (but not as elegant as) "fully tightened." Thank you, Tony, for your eminently well-reasoned responses.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2"fully tightened"
Tony M
4 -1tightened to recommended torqueblavatsky


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
"serré à butée"
"fully tightened"


Explanation:
I would keep the inveretd commas, to indicate as in FR that this is not "brute force and ignorance" tight, but based on a specific criterion (i.e. the measurement)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 45 mins (2007-02-13 20:11:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"inverted commas" — sorry!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2007-02-14 00:24:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If you tighten something to a specific torque, you can't say where it will end up; here, the criterion being used is quite clearly NOT a set torque, but a final distance measurement.

IOW, quite a range of torque might need to be used, but that isn't important; what matters is SOLELY the end position of the unit.

But it is more important not to lose sight of the fact that the original FR is in quotes, and basically means "tightened till it won't go any further", which does not imply either tightening only to a set otruqe, or anything else! IMHO, it is VITAL to retain the quotes for the EN translation, to convey exactly the same sense.

Tony M
France
Local time: 20:18
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1915
Grading comment
I chose this answer because it comported with my understanding of the terminology; I had thought of 'tightening to the limit' which is ultimately similar to (but not as elegant as) "fully tightened." Thank you, Tony, for your eminently well-reasoned responses.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  blavatsky: how about fully tightened (to recommended torque). Would this still apply even if a spacer-tube is present to govern or limit the tightening distance. I do understand you point about distance as the main issue.
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, please see my added note above.

agree  Charles Hawtrey
20 hrs
  -> Thanks, Charles!
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
tightened to recommended torque


Explanation:
binder bolt(s) should be tightened to the torque recommended by the stem ... + total height of spacers + stem height (clamp) - 3mm (adjustment clearance) = ...
http://www.canecreek.com/fileadmin/canecreek/products/headse...

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Note added at 1 hr (2007-02-13 20:44:24 GMT)
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fully tightened implies that you must know the recommended torque otherwise you will damage the thread or something else

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Note added at 1 hr (2007-02-13 20:49:17 GMT)
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If a spacer of some description is present as I think it is in this case then you don't need to measure anything, but I may be wrong. Just tighten to recommended torque ( some people know this torque after long experience and using familiar tools.)

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Note added at 1 hr (2007-02-13 20:50:04 GMT)
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I am offering this explanation in lieu of Tony's response

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Note added at 1 hr (2007-02-13 20:52:03 GMT)
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I know it does not say specific torque but it is implied because you do not want to overtighten.

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Note added at 9 hrs (2007-02-14 04:42:43 GMT)
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It all comes back to what is meant by recommended torque.
By mentioning it some safety or caution is required.
If however, mentioning it in inverted quotes is enough then I bow to this answer. If however, a lay person or someone who is "unskilled" is to read this then they won't know what torque to apply only what distance it should be set to. From my experience
it is all to easy to over-tighten so having some extra info can't hurt. Hope this helps...

blavatsky
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: Dear Blavatsky, I appreciate the tremendous help you provided with your explanations, and although I chose Tony's answer, your various comments helped me understand the concept fully. Thank you!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: But it is clear from the context given that these are NOT being tightened to a specific torque, but rather, based on a measurement criterion // Sorry, but in engineering terms, these are NOT the same thing! // Not necessarily!
31 mins
  -> If you fully tighten is not that within the recommended torque range ?
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