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ce circuit imprimé possède un plan d’alimentation

English translation: PCB (printed circuit board) has 5 V supply and earth [US: ground] layers

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:circuit imprimé possède un plan d’alimentation 5V et un plan de masse,
English translation:PCB (printed circuit board) has 5 V supply and earth [US: ground] layers
Entered by: Yolanda Broad
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08:39 May 24, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Electronics / Elect Eng / electronique
French term or phrase: ce circuit imprimé possède un plan d’alimentation
Ce circuit imprimé possède un plan d’alimentation 5V et un plan de masse, auxquelles sont reliées par des vias les pattes d’alimentation des circuits;
c'est la phrase à traduire; merci
GerardP
Local time: 19:36
This PCB has 5 V supply and earth [US: ground] layers, ...
Explanation:
...to which circuit (possibly IC [= integrated circuit]) supply pads are connected via plated through-connections.

Explanation (based on my professional knowledge of electronics / PCBs more than my specific knowledge of the French terms)

Complex PCB's are very often made in a kind of 'sandwich' construction, with multiple layers embedded within their thickness. It is not at all unusual to have a separate layer each for the power supply and the earth (or 0 V) connection, which can often solve a lot of high-density layout problems.

So I am pretty confident about plan = layer

In order to bring connections up from deeper layers to make connections to components, suitable 'holes' are made passing through clear spaces in the unwanted layers, and making connections between the wanted ones — these are often 'through-hole plated', that is to say, the 'sides' of the holes are 'plated' in such a way as to create the connection as part of the PCB manufacturing process, without requiring further procedures; however, this CAN be unreliable, and so is sometimes reinforced by other methods, usualyl simply soldering a small pin right the way through the board, which makes connection to any layers that have copper around its hole.

So I believe that vias = means through-holes (but it is something of a presumption to assume without further information that these will be plated). There may be another term that could suit better, but I'n fairly happy that you can't go far wrong with 'through-holes (whether you add 'plated' or not).

The parts of the PCB to which component pins are going to be soldered are referred to as pads or (more formally) lands; so I am very confident that pattes = pads OR lands.

As for 'circuit' — I wouldn't expect to find this word used to mean an actual circuit sub-assembly (unless your wider context makes it clear that this IS the case), so my interpration would be that they must be referring to integrated circuits [= ICs]; perhaps it might mean 'components' in general, but I feel this use of the word is unlikely; perhaps your wider context will make it clear if this board is dotted with loads of ICs (maybe accompanied by a sprinkling of other components). In any case, it is mainly ICs that would be regarded as having 'supply pins', not the simply varieties of components.

I hope this helps; please don't hesitate to contact me direct if I can be of any further assistance.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-24 10:39:32 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Except in the most formal of contexts, it is perfectly acceptable to transalte the French \'circuit imprimé\' by the English abbreviation PCB, which is SO very universal; however, I\'d advise against shortening this to PC, as might be tempting to more nearly match the French CI;

Note also that the French seem to use the abbreviation IC less commonly than we do in English; perhaps because of the very possibility of confusion with \'CI\'?

So my point is, from a technical standpoint, don\'t be afraid to use these 2 abbbreviations to translaet the above terms in your sentence.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-24 10:41:54 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Apologies for all the typos — the adrenalin rush of typing on line! But I can confirm that there are NO errors in the specific terminology, only in my explanations!

Sorry! :-(

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-24 11:20:07 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another interpretation also comes to mind; this need not necessarily be a multi-layer PCB; in which case, it is equally logical that we could be talking about a power supply and an earth/ground network (i.e. pattern of tracks serving these functions), in which case the IC supply pads/lands would be connected to these by subsidiary tracks.

However, I find it curious that in this case they would bother to be so specific in describing what is really just basic PCB design technique; there is no real need to go into such detail, UNLESS it represents something special or out-of-the-ordinary.

Perhaps the tenor of the rest of the document will make it possible for you to decide?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-25 07:55:27 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

In response to David\'s comment below, I should point out that my \'interpretation\' of \'vias\' was nothing to do with the reference he\'s so diligently found, but simply as I said a suggestion based more on my knowledge of the PCB context than any specific experience of the French terms; however, I don\'t think it\'s stretching the meaning of \'vias\' too far — it all depends on how technically precise the whole of the document is; you know how some of us technicians tend to be woolly communicators when WE know perfectly well what we\'re talking about! :-)

However, it was this sort of consideration that led me to make my further suggestion, not involving plated through-holes; I think that certainly fits more closely with the \'traditional\' meanings of \'vias\'.

I hope the Asker managed to sort it all out from their context, and I thank David again for his very helpful observations.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3313 days (2012-06-18 21:51:10 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Do note that 'plane' is also used for PCBs — very specifically, in the term 'ground plane' (more common than 'earth plane', even in BE!)

But I think it sits a little less comfortably to refer to a '+5 V plane' — you might even want to consider a '+5 V layer' and a 'ground plane'.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 19:36
Grading comment
Thanks a lot Dusty. I was quite impressed with all the explanations. And you are right on the point, it's an out-of-the-ordinary thing I transalte at this time.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2This PCB has 5 V supply and earth [US: ground] layers, ...
Tony M
3This printed ciruit has a 5V supply layout
truptee
3 -1Tentative :
Florence Evans


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Tentative :


Explanation:
This printed circuit has a supply program of 5V and a storage program, to which the supply circuits'legs are tied up with screws.

Florence Evans
Local time: 19:36
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: Sorry, but this would be nonsense, technically, in EN
3313 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

57 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
This printed ciruit has a 5V supply layout


Explanation:
This printed ciruit has a 5V supply layout and an overall layout, to which the circuit supply legs are relinked by vias.


vias= sub-routes/ sub-branches
(http://www.histomaps.com/bdd/compostelle.htm)

truptee
Local time: 23:06
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in HindiHindi
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
This PCB has 5 V supply and earth [US: ground] layers, ...


Explanation:
...to which circuit (possibly IC [= integrated circuit]) supply pads are connected via plated through-connections.

Explanation (based on my professional knowledge of electronics / PCBs more than my specific knowledge of the French terms)

Complex PCB's are very often made in a kind of 'sandwich' construction, with multiple layers embedded within their thickness. It is not at all unusual to have a separate layer each for the power supply and the earth (or 0 V) connection, which can often solve a lot of high-density layout problems.

So I am pretty confident about plan = layer

In order to bring connections up from deeper layers to make connections to components, suitable 'holes' are made passing through clear spaces in the unwanted layers, and making connections between the wanted ones — these are often 'through-hole plated', that is to say, the 'sides' of the holes are 'plated' in such a way as to create the connection as part of the PCB manufacturing process, without requiring further procedures; however, this CAN be unreliable, and so is sometimes reinforced by other methods, usualyl simply soldering a small pin right the way through the board, which makes connection to any layers that have copper around its hole.

So I believe that vias = means through-holes (but it is something of a presumption to assume without further information that these will be plated). There may be another term that could suit better, but I'n fairly happy that you can't go far wrong with 'through-holes (whether you add 'plated' or not).

The parts of the PCB to which component pins are going to be soldered are referred to as pads or (more formally) lands; so I am very confident that pattes = pads OR lands.

As for 'circuit' — I wouldn't expect to find this word used to mean an actual circuit sub-assembly (unless your wider context makes it clear that this IS the case), so my interpration would be that they must be referring to integrated circuits [= ICs]; perhaps it might mean 'components' in general, but I feel this use of the word is unlikely; perhaps your wider context will make it clear if this board is dotted with loads of ICs (maybe accompanied by a sprinkling of other components). In any case, it is mainly ICs that would be regarded as having 'supply pins', not the simply varieties of components.

I hope this helps; please don't hesitate to contact me direct if I can be of any further assistance.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-24 10:39:32 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Except in the most formal of contexts, it is perfectly acceptable to transalte the French \'circuit imprimé\' by the English abbreviation PCB, which is SO very universal; however, I\'d advise against shortening this to PC, as might be tempting to more nearly match the French CI;

Note also that the French seem to use the abbreviation IC less commonly than we do in English; perhaps because of the very possibility of confusion with \'CI\'?

So my point is, from a technical standpoint, don\'t be afraid to use these 2 abbbreviations to translaet the above terms in your sentence.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-24 10:41:54 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Apologies for all the typos — the adrenalin rush of typing on line! But I can confirm that there are NO errors in the specific terminology, only in my explanations!

Sorry! :-(

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-24 11:20:07 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another interpretation also comes to mind; this need not necessarily be a multi-layer PCB; in which case, it is equally logical that we could be talking about a power supply and an earth/ground network (i.e. pattern of tracks serving these functions), in which case the IC supply pads/lands would be connected to these by subsidiary tracks.

However, I find it curious that in this case they would bother to be so specific in describing what is really just basic PCB design technique; there is no real need to go into such detail, UNLESS it represents something special or out-of-the-ordinary.

Perhaps the tenor of the rest of the document will make it possible for you to decide?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-25 07:55:27 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

In response to David\'s comment below, I should point out that my \'interpretation\' of \'vias\' was nothing to do with the reference he\'s so diligently found, but simply as I said a suggestion based more on my knowledge of the PCB context than any specific experience of the French terms; however, I don\'t think it\'s stretching the meaning of \'vias\' too far — it all depends on how technically precise the whole of the document is; you know how some of us technicians tend to be woolly communicators when WE know perfectly well what we\'re talking about! :-)

However, it was this sort of consideration that led me to make my further suggestion, not involving plated through-holes; I think that certainly fits more closely with the \'traditional\' meanings of \'vias\'.

I hope the Asker managed to sort it all out from their context, and I thank David again for his very helpful observations.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3313 days (2012-06-18 21:51:10 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Do note that 'plane' is also used for PCBs — very specifically, in the term 'ground plane' (more common than 'earth plane', even in BE!)

But I think it sits a little less comfortably to refer to a '+5 V plane' — you might even want to consider a '+5 V layer' and a 'ground plane'.

Tony M
France
Local time: 19:36
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1915
Grading comment
Thanks a lot Dusty. I was quite impressed with all the explanations. And you are right on the point, it's an out-of-the-ordinary thing I transalte at this time.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Parrot: trust this guy on anything about electricity...
16 mins
  -> Thanks, Parrot! Your kind comment comes on a day when I'm terribly depressed, and brings a warm glow to my heart

agree  Gayle Wallimann: Indeed ,an expert in the realm of electricity.
1 hr
  -> Why thanks, Gayle — how kind of you!

neutral  David Sirett: Simply because "via" is used in English (see http://www.laservia.com/PDF/ejc98.pdf). Plated through-holes are "trous métallisés", aren't they?
12 hrs
  -> Thanks, David! Please see fuller comment above...
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Changes made by editors
Mar 29, 2011 - Changes made by Stéphanie Soudais:
Term askedThe sentence please » ce circuit imprimé possède un plan d’alimentation


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