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trames croisées

English translation: cross-ply

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:trames croisées
English translation:cross-ply
Entered by: French2English
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10:36 Feb 22, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Engineering (general) / belt conveyor
French term or phrase: trames croisées
I have checked the various meaning of 'trames' and wonder if this is referring to the weave of the fabric from which the belt is made - looks like it must be, but I am stumped as to how to actually translate 'Trames croisées'. This is a special belt conveyor used in the waste processing industry, by the way.

Caractéristiques des bandes
Les bandes des convoyeurs à sole de glissement seront EP 400/ 3 4+0.
- Trames croisées en polyester ou polyamide
- Anti gras
- Résistance aux agents chimiques te hydrocarbures
- ²Classement feu
French2English
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:30
cross-ply
Explanation:
I would certainly go along with everything CMJ has said.

'cross-ply' is the term (that used to be) used for vehicle tyres, and I'm pretty sure the same thing applies to the construction of things like rubber belts etc. 2 layers of fabric, with the weave going the opposite way...

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Note added at 2 hrs (2008-02-22 12:36:10 GMT)
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To answer the point made by fourth:

If we take 'trame' to mean 'weave', then 'trame croisé' would mean 'cross-weave'

However, if we take 'trame' to mean 'weft', then it is already going to have been 'crossed' with the 'warp' in the weaving process — and hence it can only mean that the woven fabric is indeed crossed with something else.

Do note, too, that it is used in the plural — suggesting once again that we are talking about 2 separate woven layers (otherwise, the implication would be 'trame et chaîne croisés')

And finally, the use of cross-ply fabric in this way to reinforce things like rubber belts is common enough — in just the same way that the wood grain is crossed in plywood manufacture, for example.

So I rest my case, M'lud! ;-)
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 01:30
Grading comment
Makes perfect sense to me. Great answer - thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
1 +3cross-ply
Tony M
3woven
fourth


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
woven


Explanation:
crossed as in a weave

fourth
France
Local time: 01:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Fairly unlikely, as they've specifically chosen to express it this way, instead of merely saying 'tissé' / No room to comment properly here, please see added note to my own answer.
16 mins
  -> and the same for "à carcasse diagonale", Tony? "Woven polyester" sounds OK to me
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +3
cross-ply


Explanation:
I would certainly go along with everything CMJ has said.

'cross-ply' is the term (that used to be) used for vehicle tyres, and I'm pretty sure the same thing applies to the construction of things like rubber belts etc. 2 layers of fabric, with the weave going the opposite way...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2008-02-22 12:36:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To answer the point made by fourth:

If we take 'trame' to mean 'weave', then 'trame croisé' would mean 'cross-weave'

However, if we take 'trame' to mean 'weft', then it is already going to have been 'crossed' with the 'warp' in the weaving process — and hence it can only mean that the woven fabric is indeed crossed with something else.

Do note, too, that it is used in the plural — suggesting once again that we are talking about 2 separate woven layers (otherwise, the implication would be 'trame et chaîne croisés')

And finally, the use of cross-ply fabric in this way to reinforce things like rubber belts is common enough — in just the same way that the wood grain is crossed in plywood manufacture, for example.

So I rest my case, M'lud! ;-)

Tony M
France
Local time: 01:30
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 586
Grading comment
Makes perfect sense to me. Great answer - thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  chris collister: Yes, but just how cross can it be?
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Chris! Oh, simply LIVID, I'd say!

agree  xxxBourth: My instinct also. Belts made of rubber, so tyre terminology (radial vs cross ply) prob. applies.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Alex!

agree  xxxEuqinimod
1 day5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Euqinimod!
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Changes made by editors
Feb 22, 2008 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Term askedTrames croisées » trames croisées


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