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torons non adhérants

English translation: tendons (engineering)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:torons
English translation:tendons (engineering)
Entered by: Conor McAuley
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13:24 Feb 21, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Engineering (general)
French term or phrase: torons non adhérants
Fr (Belg) > Eng (UK)

"X.Y.Z Dalles hyperstatiques

Les dalles hyperstatiques sont généralement de type postcontraint. Ce n'est que ces dernières années que méthode de construction est devenue courante dans la construction des bâtiments et habitations grâce principalement à l'application de ***torons non adhérants***"

Toron is given as "harness" by the Routl. Tech. but I'm not 100% sure about that.

See also previous question.
Conor McAuley
France
Local time: 05:28
explanation
Explanation:
There are two types of prestressed concrete. Both involve steel (or composite) cables or wires which professionals know as "tendons".

For standard building projects (as opposed to civil engineering projects such as bridges and exceptionally large or complex buildings), prestressed concrete is pre-tensioned. IOW, you have a casting bed (or mould) through which you lay and tension wires/cables/tendons before pouring the concrete in. The tendons (stranded wires, sometimes ribbed bars, etc.) provide grip for the concrete. When the concrete has set, the tension is released from the tendons which tend to contract, compressing (prestressing) the concrete. In beams, for instance, they induce "hog", or upwards deflection of the beam, so that when in place, the natural downwards deflection is cancelled out and you get a perfectly straight beam.

The second type is post-tensioned prestress. In this, the concrete element is formed with hollow "tubes" running along its length. When removed from the mould, or when installed on site, prestressing tendons are fed into the "tubes", anchored to the concrete at one end, and the other end of the tendon is stretched tight to the desired level of prestress, and itself anchored by various means. The result is the same as with pretensioned prestress, except that the stress level can, in most cases, be varied if necessary, and tendons can be removed and replaced if damaged, etc.

As your text says, the latter technique is gaining in popularity in normal (but large) building projects.
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 05:28
Grading comment
Thanks Alex and thanks Dusty for "unbonded", which I also used.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5explanationxxxBourth
2 +1See comment below...
Tony M


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
See comment below...


Explanation:
I've a feeling that this term 'toron' came up in cnnection with another question a little while back, and freidn Bourth told us this was one of the names for that twisted type of steel reinforcing rods; clearly, if they don't 'stick' to the concrete, it will be easier to post-stress the concrete elements!

I'll try and look it up, and if I find it, repost a note...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 55 mins (2005-02-21 14:19:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Well, I can\'t for the life of me find that question, but GDT comes up with

\'unbonded steel tendon\'

for \'toron d\'acier non-adhérent\' --- but the context is given as \'steel cable\', so I\'m not sure if this is relevant or not.



Tony M
France
Local time: 05:28
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 586

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: Entirely relevant. The rebars were "torsadé", from memory.
19 mins
  -> Thanks, Alex! So relieved you popped up :-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
explanation


Explanation:
There are two types of prestressed concrete. Both involve steel (or composite) cables or wires which professionals know as "tendons".

For standard building projects (as opposed to civil engineering projects such as bridges and exceptionally large or complex buildings), prestressed concrete is pre-tensioned. IOW, you have a casting bed (or mould) through which you lay and tension wires/cables/tendons before pouring the concrete in. The tendons (stranded wires, sometimes ribbed bars, etc.) provide grip for the concrete. When the concrete has set, the tension is released from the tendons which tend to contract, compressing (prestressing) the concrete. In beams, for instance, they induce "hog", or upwards deflection of the beam, so that when in place, the natural downwards deflection is cancelled out and you get a perfectly straight beam.

The second type is post-tensioned prestress. In this, the concrete element is formed with hollow "tubes" running along its length. When removed from the mould, or when installed on site, prestressing tendons are fed into the "tubes", anchored to the concrete at one end, and the other end of the tendon is stretched tight to the desired level of prestress, and itself anchored by various means. The result is the same as with pretensioned prestress, except that the stress level can, in most cases, be varied if necessary, and tendons can be removed and replaced if damaged, etc.

As your text says, the latter technique is gaining in popularity in normal (but large) building projects.

xxxBourth
Local time: 05:28
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1054
Grading comment
Thanks Alex and thanks Dusty for "unbonded", which I also used.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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