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la saturation des besoins solvables

English translation: the point where people have every thing they need an can afford

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23:55 Feb 9, 2009
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Finance (general) / investment
French term or phrase: la saturation des besoins solvables
From a document explaining the advantages of livestock investment.
"Une économie basée uniquement sur la croissance est confrontée tôt ou tard à la *saturation des besoins solvables*"
Alison Martin
France
Local time: 17:31
English translation:the point where people have every thing they need an can afford
Explanation:
You can probably get away with either 'saturation of wants' or 'saturation of satisfiable needs', but that is 'economicspeak' the average investor interested in cows will probably not recognize... In French (economicspeak) 'besoin' and 'besoin solvable' are :

" Définition du besoin : Sentiment de manque ou de privation que l’on cherche à satisfaire par la consommation d’un bien ou d’un service marchand ou non marchand."

and 'besoins solvables' are:

"Besoins pour lesquels le consommateur est prêt et a les moyens de payer."

Strictly speaking 'besoins' are necessities or needs rather than wants or desires, unless you consider 'want' to poetically mean 'lack' rather than desire.


You will notice that rkillings cites 19th Century economists for 'saturation of wants'. This concept was current for many years in the 19th and (much of the 20th) centuries but has become discredited. This is why I posted the request for clarification.

The person writing this is writing promotional literature for livestock investments and probably does not hold economics degrees from the University of Chicago or Cambridge and does not have a consummate understanding of these terms.

Since this is not scholarly research, I don't think you need terminology from 19th Century economists... or economists at all, but language easily understood by the average investor.

So, the sentence "Une économie basée uniquement sur la croissance est confrontée tôt ou tard à la *saturation des besoins solvables*" is a thought that is not considered to be valid by a consensus of informed contemporary economists. A computer was not a widely affordable necessity (besoin solvable) in my childhood because they did not exist. 'Besoins solvables' are now considered to be in constant flux and evolve rapidly, so talking about them as something that can be 'sated' just does not have that much meaning to economists.

Since this is a pitch for investments, I might consider eschewing Economicspeak altogether and avoid 'saturation of wants' which those who have studied economic history will indeed recall but it is rather time-worn than "time-honored".

So, what this all means is that, when "an economy based only on growth sooner or later is confronted with the fact that people have everything they need or can afford."

The statement is not correct, but economics is not the point here, selling cows is. By coincidence I live in Texas and have experience with livestock and investment. This is not an economics paper, it is promotional literature and this writing is what we characterize in Texas using the sacred "time-honored" taurine scatological metaphor.

Of course, for clients and most proofreaders, they really, really like cognates (saturation/saturation) and a phrase with no verbs in English if there are none in French. So you could go with either of the entries posted so far, but a phrase like the one above says it exactly and in natural English in a register suitable to those involved in Selling and buying livestock investment.



Selected response from:

joehlindsay
Local time: 10:31
Grading comment
Thank you to everyone for your answers. This one best suited the style of my text, which was indeed promotional literature. Thank you joehlindsay
for your very detailed comment :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4the point where people have every thing they need an can affordjoehlindsay
4saturation of wantsrkillings
4saturation of satisfiable needs
Jacques Raymond


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
saturation of satisfiable needs


Explanation:
Capable of being satisfied: satisfiable needs and desires.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.


    Reference: http://www.bartleby.com/61/92/S0099200.html
Jacques Raymond
Canada
Local time: 11:31
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
saturation of wants


Explanation:
The time-honoured phrase in English. cf. 'Gossen's first law' (Hermann Heinrich Gossen, 1810-1858). Prussian economist who developed a theory of marginal utility before Jevons and Walras.

Maybe the writer has studied economics. :-)

rkillings
United States
Local time: 08:31
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1140
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
the point where people have every thing they need an can afford


Explanation:
You can probably get away with either 'saturation of wants' or 'saturation of satisfiable needs', but that is 'economicspeak' the average investor interested in cows will probably not recognize... In French (economicspeak) 'besoin' and 'besoin solvable' are :

" Définition du besoin : Sentiment de manque ou de privation que l’on cherche à satisfaire par la consommation d’un bien ou d’un service marchand ou non marchand."

and 'besoins solvables' are:

"Besoins pour lesquels le consommateur est prêt et a les moyens de payer."

Strictly speaking 'besoins' are necessities or needs rather than wants or desires, unless you consider 'want' to poetically mean 'lack' rather than desire.


You will notice that rkillings cites 19th Century economists for 'saturation of wants'. This concept was current for many years in the 19th and (much of the 20th) centuries but has become discredited. This is why I posted the request for clarification.

The person writing this is writing promotional literature for livestock investments and probably does not hold economics degrees from the University of Chicago or Cambridge and does not have a consummate understanding of these terms.

Since this is not scholarly research, I don't think you need terminology from 19th Century economists... or economists at all, but language easily understood by the average investor.

So, the sentence "Une économie basée uniquement sur la croissance est confrontée tôt ou tard à la *saturation des besoins solvables*" is a thought that is not considered to be valid by a consensus of informed contemporary economists. A computer was not a widely affordable necessity (besoin solvable) in my childhood because they did not exist. 'Besoins solvables' are now considered to be in constant flux and evolve rapidly, so talking about them as something that can be 'sated' just does not have that much meaning to economists.

Since this is a pitch for investments, I might consider eschewing Economicspeak altogether and avoid 'saturation of wants' which those who have studied economic history will indeed recall but it is rather time-worn than "time-honored".

So, what this all means is that, when "an economy based only on growth sooner or later is confronted with the fact that people have everything they need or can afford."

The statement is not correct, but economics is not the point here, selling cows is. By coincidence I live in Texas and have experience with livestock and investment. This is not an economics paper, it is promotional literature and this writing is what we characterize in Texas using the sacred "time-honored" taurine scatological metaphor.

Of course, for clients and most proofreaders, they really, really like cognates (saturation/saturation) and a phrase with no verbs in English if there are none in French. So you could go with either of the entries posted so far, but a phrase like the one above says it exactly and in natural English in a register suitable to those involved in Selling and buying livestock investment.





joehlindsay
Local time: 10:31
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 272
Grading comment
Thank you to everyone for your answers. This one best suited the style of my text, which was indeed promotional literature. Thank you joehlindsay
for your very detailed comment :-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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