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Pic apéro champêtre

English translation: cocktail savoury

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22:37 Feb 3, 2009
French to English translations [PRO]
Food & Drink
French term or phrase: Pic apéro champêtre
Found in a menu for a cocktail reception. I understand "pics apero" are the little sticks you put into party foods, but does anyone have any idea what we might call this as a dish in English (IE what would go on the menu)? It's for quite an upmarket event, so I'm looking for something reasonably formal if possible.

Thanks in advance

Chris
Chris Hodgson
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:35
English translation:cocktail savoury
Explanation:
If you really have no further details, then you'll probably need something as vague as this; no real need to mention it's 'on a stick', if oyur'e not going to mention what it actually is (cf. 'sausages on stcks')

But this sounds suitably classy to cover a whole range of possibilities.

Of course, if the whole menu is as sybilline as this, then you might end up with 'selection of 16 different types of cocktail savoury'!

I feel pretty sure that the 'champêtre' refers to the ingredients on the stick, but exactly what could be anyone's guess — might be mushrooms, but then again, it might be country ham, or just about anything that could conceivably have some connection with rural life — perhaps we can rule out seafood and things like foie gras!

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Note added at 39 mins (2009-02-03 23:16:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

'cocktail savouries sur l'herbe' (with apologies to Manet!)
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 14:35
Grading comment
Thanks Tony, and to everyone else for your value input - I wasn't expecting such frenzied debate! Brochette was mentioned quite regularly elsewhere in the text, so was a no-go really, and I think this option was the best in terms of tone - even if it was followed by the equally vague "selection of canapes"!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
2 +3cocktail savoury
Tony M
4Picnic of finger foodMarta France
4Comfort appetizers brochette-styleMatthewLaSon
1 +2country-style appetizer brochette
NancyLynn
3 -1Cocktails
fourth
Summary of reference entries provided
fête champêtre
Helen Shiner

Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +2
country-style appetizer brochette


Explanation:
but are they vegetarian? I'm just trying to get the ball rolling

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2009-02-03 22:49:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

could be mini-kebabs, veggie brochettes, as Tony says you need to clarify this with your client.

NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 08:35
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Elettra Franchi: I think the term "brochette" suits perfectly for an upmarket event; much better than the les fancy word "skewer".
22 mins

neutral  xxxLionel_M: country-style appetizer OK, but why "brochette" ??? is it a BBQ ?
23 mins
  -> not necessarily - perhaps mignonette vegetables skewered onto a mini-brochette

neutral  Tony M: But both 'brochette' and 'skewer' sound like something much larger than the classic cocktail stick, or yuppie variants on that. / As a Brit, I must admit I'd never heard the word 'brochette' till I came to France... maybe Brits are better-informed today!
24 mins
  -> how about mini-brochette?

agree  B D Finch: Whatever a "yuppie variant" on a cocktail stick may be, I think "brochette" is too big. Agree with "country-style". Why not! Good idea.
30 mins
  -> how about mini-brochette?
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Picnic of finger food


Explanation:
I've heard "finger food" often enough, it seems a respectable enough term.

Picnic tips from The Telegraph:
"Struggling with a plate, fork and glass while sitting on an uneven patch of grass is stressful, so go for **finger-food** rather than bowls of salad."
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/recipes/3338333/The-...

Better than "dead things on sticks" as I've heard them called!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2009-02-03 22:54:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I agree that "champêtre" is tricky - how about sticking to "finger food buffet"?

Marta France
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:35
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: But these would be just one item probably... and I don't really see how you can extrapolate to 'picnic', unless you're suggesting it might be 'picnic-style' food?
18 mins
  -> yes Tony, see what you mean, it is part of the menu - time to turn the computer off I think! Point taken, thanks
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33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Cocktails


Explanation:
the champêtre in this case being "relaxed", nothing more than simple stuff.
On sticks? Toothpicks? No real equivalent, but cocktails summarises it.
And it's an aperitif.

fourth
France
Local time: 14:35
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: Yes, but an En reader would almost certainly assume 'cocktail' meant some kind of (probably alcoholic!) drink
4 mins
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35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +3
pic apéro champêtre
cocktail savoury


Explanation:
If you really have no further details, then you'll probably need something as vague as this; no real need to mention it's 'on a stick', if oyur'e not going to mention what it actually is (cf. 'sausages on stcks')

But this sounds suitably classy to cover a whole range of possibilities.

Of course, if the whole menu is as sybilline as this, then you might end up with 'selection of 16 different types of cocktail savoury'!

I feel pretty sure that the 'champêtre' refers to the ingredients on the stick, but exactly what could be anyone's guess — might be mushrooms, but then again, it might be country ham, or just about anything that could conceivably have some connection with rural life — perhaps we can rule out seafood and things like foie gras!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 39 mins (2009-02-03 23:16:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

'cocktail savouries sur l'herbe' (with apologies to Manet!)

Tony M
France
Local time: 14:36
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 159
Grading comment
Thanks Tony, and to everyone else for your value input - I wasn't expecting such frenzied debate! Brochette was mentioned quite regularly elsewhere in the text, so was a no-go really, and I think this option was the best in terms of tone - even if it was followed by the equally vague "selection of canapes"!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marta France: a good option
8 mins
  -> Thanks, Marta!

agree  xxxLionel_M: Just because u citted Manet Tony -))
10 mins
  -> Merci, Lionel ! :-))

agree  Helen Shiner: With Lionel - strange reworkings now in my head, thanks!!
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Helen!

neutral  MatthewLaSon: Why did you skip on the meaning of "champêtre". I find there is no reason to do so.
18 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Comfort appetizers brochette-style


Explanation:
Hello,

These are just "appetizers on-a-stick", but as this is at a real fancy place, "brochette" is more fitting (on a stick).

champêtre = of the countryside

When food pertain "of the countryside", we often call it "comfort foods" where I'm from. "Comfort" means that these appetizers really aren't "fancy foods", but rather "comfort foods."

I hope this helps.



MatthewLaSon
Local time: 08:36
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 27

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: 'champêtre' certainly relates to rurality, yes — but doesn't connote 'comfort'. That kind of hearty country fare would be more likely to be referred to as 'campagnard', for example.
5 hrs
  -> "Comfort foods" often implies "rural foods" where I am from. Anyways, it seem that there is very little difference in meaning between "champêtre" and "campagnard".
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Reference comments


12 mins peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: fête champêtre

Reference information:
In case it is of any inspiration for someone else, the 'champêtre' bit comes as far as I know from the term for grand garden parties held in the 18th century:

A Fête champêtre was a popular form of entertainment in the 18th century, taking the form of a garden party. This form of entertainment was particularly popular at the French court where at Versailles areas of the park were landscaped with follies, pavilions and temples to accommodate such festivities.

While the term is derived for the French expression for a "pastoral festival" or "country feast" and in theory was simple form of entertainment in practice, at least in the 18th century, a fête champêtre was often a very elegant form of entertainment involving on occasions whole orchestras hidden in trees, with guests sometimes in fancy dress.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fête_champêtre

As to what should go on your menu, I'm sorry but I haven't a clue.

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Note to reference poster
Asker: Thanks for taking the time to post this too Helen - it was informative and useful, as it steered me away from "farmhouse/traditional-style" options.


Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Tony M: Fascinating!
10 hrs
  -> thanks, Tony, though not sure it made any difference, but it is such a lovely term...
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