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Poupeton vosgien à l'ancienne

English translation: stuffed roll/roulade in parentheses

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18:48 Dec 3, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Food & Drink / menu
French term or phrase: Poupeton vosgien à l'ancienne
Poupeton vosgien à l'ancienne, confiture d'oignons
In a menu. Not much to go on here. I've found lots of references to "Poupeton". Apparently it can be "pupton", a braised dish in puff pastry, or "pulpatoon", which is a delicate cake, usually with fruit puree! There are references to "poupeton de courgettes", but also "apple poupeton". The poupeton de courgettes doesn't seem to have a crust or be braised. So, I think I'll probably have to stick to leaving the "poupeton" in French to keep an element of mystery, but "vosgien" doesn't give much away either!
HelenY
English translation:stuffed roll/roulade in parentheses
Explanation:
this way you can keep both the French and the English (people don't like to have to ask the waiter to explain the entire menu)

Resto Guide - Glossaire Gastronomique
Poupeton, Apprêt ancien de viande de boucherie ou de volaille désossée, farcie, roulée en ballottine ou en paupiettes et généralement braisée. ...
www.resto-guide.com/glossaire/ glossaire_bas.cfm?mot_cle=Poupeton
Selected response from:

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 00:22
Grading comment
Although I agree with Richard that it's often good to leave some menu items in French, I think that as this one is so obscure, it needs a little explanation. As Rita says, a lot of people just wouldn't order it as it stands.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2Traditional Vosges-style poupeton
Richard Benham
3stuffed roll/roulade in parenthesesRHELLER


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


48 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Poupeton vosgien à l'ancienne
stuffed roll/roulade in parentheses


Explanation:
this way you can keep both the French and the English (people don't like to have to ask the waiter to explain the entire menu)

Resto Guide - Glossaire Gastronomique
Poupeton, Apprêt ancien de viande de boucherie ou de volaille désossée, farcie, roulée en ballottine ou en paupiettes et généralement braisée. ...
www.resto-guide.com/glossaire/ glossaire_bas.cfm?mot_cle=Poupeton

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 00:22
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 14
Grading comment
Although I agree with Richard that it's often good to leave some menu items in French, I think that as this one is so obscure, it needs a little explanation. As Rita says, a lot of people just wouldn't order it as it stands.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Richard Benham: Whenever I get my food served in parentheses, I ask the waiter to take them away! Hi there Rita. ;-)
4 mins
  -> Hi Richard! speaking from the U.S. point of view, no one would ever order this...certain things have entered the vocabulary, like foie gras, but this is not even known in France
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Poupeton vosgien à l'ancienne
Traditional Vosges-style poupeton


Explanation:
You have got to get over the quaint notion that menus are there to be understood. They are there to impres by their obscurity.

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Note added at 10 mins (2004-12-03 18:59:35 GMT)
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Sorry, impress.

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Note added at 1 hr 15 mins (2004-12-03 20:03:54 GMT)
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It should be borne in mind that menu translations are generally for tourists, not for general restaurant-goers. So a bit of mystery and asking the waiter questions is all part of the experience. If in doubt, why not ask to try the dish?

Richard Benham
France
Local time: 08:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charlie Bavington: I'd need to ask the waiter what a pupton, pulpatoon or beggar's pouch was anyway, so why not leave it indeed. After you with the onion jam!!
26 mins
  -> Well said, Charlie!

agree  Mark Nathan: there's nothing wrong with qualifying it by saying that you need more information if the client wants a more helpful translation
1 hr
  -> I'd be demanding a tasting....
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