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(vous me prenez pour un) jambon (ou quoi)

English translation: (Do I look like some sort of) idiot?

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:(vous me prenez pour un) jambon (ou quoi)?
English translation:(Do I look like some sort of) idiot?
Entered by: Melissa McMahon
Options:
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12:26 Sep 23, 2007
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
French term or phrase: (vous me prenez pour un) jambon (ou quoi)
I gather this is basically: "You think I'm stupid or something?"
I can't think of anything more suggestive than that. Any ideas? I'd also like to confirm that is the right meaning.

The context is not much help: it's a "making of" film, a series of shots in which the director gets a bit (not much) "tough", including one where he says, to no one in particular, "Mais vous me prenez pour un jambon ou quoi?"
Melissa McMahon
Australia
Local time: 12:30
what do you take me for? An idiot?
Explanation:
Are you taking me for some sort of idiot?

----

I'd love to be able to say "Do you take me for a ham, or what?" in this context - but that would be too much!!
Selected response from:

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:30
Grading comment
In the end I put "Do I look like some sort of idiot?", which isn't quite your suggestion, but it was the phrase "some sort of" that got me on the track, and you were the first to suggest that.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +5"You taking me for a fool or what/something? "xxxJac Leventre
3 +4Do you think I'm thick (or something)?
Miranda Joubioux
4 +3D'you think I'm some kind of idiot?
Tony M
3 +3what do you take me for? An idiot?
Carol Gullidge
4 +1I wasn't born yesterday, you know!
Katarina Peters
3do you think I'm a (complete) moron or what ?iol


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
"You taking me for a fool or what/something? "


Explanation:
in speach "are"" can be left out before you,can be ended with what or something in colloquial speech.

xxxJac Leventre
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you for confirming the sense.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Carol Gullidge
2 mins
  -> merci !

agree  msabeh
15 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Maria Karra
1 hr
  -> thanks

agree  1045: Do you take me for a fool or what?
3 hrs
  -> thanks

agree  NancyLynn
4 hrs
  -> thanks
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
what do you take me for? An idiot?


Explanation:
Are you taking me for some sort of idiot?

----

I'd love to be able to say "Do you take me for a ham, or what?" in this context - but that would be too much!!

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:30
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 116
Grading comment
In the end I put "Do I look like some sort of idiot?", which isn't quite your suggestion, but it was the phrase "some sort of" that got me on the track, and you were the first to suggest that.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Yes, I thought of that too, but indeed, too much. Thanks for the rephrases, I'm mulling them over.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxJac Leventre: to take someone for a ham would mean to think they are a low grade actor!
25 mins
  -> exactly, that was the point! Thanks, Jac!

agree  1045: OR "Do you take me for a fool or what?"
3 hrs
  -> thanks, 1045, good suggestion!

agree  laenai
18 hrs
  -> thanks, laenai!
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
I wasn't born yesterday, you know!


Explanation:
just another (milder) way of saying it

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 55 mins (2007-09-23 13:22:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or, I would just say "you're insulting me by calling me an idiot"

Katarina Peters
Canada
Local time: 22:30
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in HungarianHungarian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks for your suggestion.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Yes, Katarina, but that really has a subtly different meaning... / No, not at all, there's no question of age; 'born yesterday' means gullible, not stupid
8 mins
  -> Thanks Tony, I think you mean that it has an "age" connotation...but what it really means imho, is "don't take me for stupid, I know my stuff better than you, I studied it for years...etc.etc."//Ok, Tony, I bow to your opinion...

agree  chaplin: I do not agree with Tony
7 hrs
  -> Well thank you Ségolène, I welcome your support. We're all entitled to our opinion, as long as it's not too far off base...
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32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
D'you think I'm some kind of idiot?


Explanation:
I have had it confirmed by a number of my FR friends that this is indeed the right general meaning.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2007-09-23 15:25:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Redolent of the song "What kind of fool am I?"

Or of course "What kind of fool d'you take me for?"

Tony M
France
Local time: 04:30
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 316
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks for your help, many suggestions were equally good.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charlie Bavington: have to agree here, 'cos "some kind of" was the exact phrase I thought of when I saw the Q. Wonder, if remark directed to no-one in partic, whether "do you people think..." might also work
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, CB! Yes, I guess that is the sort of way one is likely to come out with it...

agree  1045: OR "Do you take me for a fool or what?"
3 hrs
  -> Merci, JC ! Yes, that too ...

agree  Miranda Joubioux
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Miranda!
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
do you think I'm a (complete) moron or what ?


Explanation:
Just another suggestion.

iol
France
Local time: 04:30
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: French
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks for your suggestion


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Good idea, but to be used with care, as it is taking down a specific meaning route that might (or might not) be appropriate.
6 mins
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Do you think I'm thick (or something)?


Explanation:
Just another variant!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2007-09-23 16:47:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Do you think I'm dumb?
could also be used.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2007-09-23 16:59:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Dumb is a little American, but then it's always worth exploring all options, since we are not aware of the full context, the type of audience the film is for, etc.

Miranda Joubioux
Local time: 04:30
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 11
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks for your suggestions.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, though I somehow get the feeling that the word 'thick' is more likely to be used by someone who actually is, or at least, is afraid of being? / To me, 'dumb' has a very US ring about it, I don't know how others feel?
17 mins
  -> Thanks Tony

agree  Charlie Bavington: mebbe "stupid" rather than "thick"? The more I think aboout it, the more I have a feeling Tony has a point - thick IS often used by people who are.... (intellectual snobs alert!)
43 mins
  -> Thanks Charlie

agree  1045: OR "Do you take me for a fool or what?"
1 hr
  -> Thanks

agree  chaplin
5 hrs
  -> Thanks
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Changes made by editors
Sep 23, 2007 - Changes made by Tony M:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO


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