KudoZ home » French to English » Government / Politics

Je vous prie d’agréer, Monsieur les assurances de mon profond respect.

English translation: Yours sincerely,

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
21:01 May 18, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Government / Politics
French term or phrase: Je vous prie d’agréer, Monsieur les assurances de mon profond respect.
Help
Lissouck
English translation:Yours sincerely,
Explanation:
In my view, there's no need to go for a full translation of this as it would be completely archaic in English; I believe you should simply choose a natural, respectful way of signing off a letter.
Selected response from:

Paul Malone
France
Local time: 19:27
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +17Yours sincerely,
Paul Malone
5 +3Yours faithfullyEmma B
5 +2Sincerely yours / RegardsJulia Bogdan Rollo
4 +3Thank you sincerely for your time and attention to this matter.A-C Robertson
5 +1Sincerely,
Karine Gentil
4Respectfully yours/please accept my highest considerationAssimina Vavoula


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Je vous prie d’agréer, Monsieur les assurances de mon profond respect.
Thank you sincerely for your time and attention to this matter.


Explanation:
The "Je vous prie" is a French formality that doesn't translate directly into English. My version is a common way to close a formal letter. There are endless variations upon this:

Thank you in advance for your time and consideration of this matter.
I thank you sincerely for your consideration of this matter.

etc.
etc.

A-C Robertson
Local time: 10:27
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Maria Callebaut: can you still find this? Sounds a bit out of date-)... Well, it's just that a lot of people are trying to avoid such a have closure (esp. in the US) - although your translation really reflects French way of thinking and writing
9 mins
  -> out of date? I write it and hear it every day in formal letters. This is not a closing such as "Your sincerely", which might be "cordialement", it's a whole paragraph...

agree  Monica Sandor: I wouldn't use this in the run of the mill letter, as one would the French version, but perhaps if you are asking for a real favour or extra investigation of an issue, you might thank the person in advance, otherwise just standard "Yours sincerely"
15 mins

agree  Carmen Schultz: good explanation!
1 hr

neutral  Karine Gentil: Actaully correct but the way you have it that's not the salutation. There is always the Sincerely yours (or any variation thereof) after the closing sentence in a letter. And that is what the asker really needs
3 hrs

agree  Donovan Libring: you can use this if you want to really butter up your client and if that is your purpose. It is not used very much anymore, but is a valid response. sincerely or cordially yours or any other closing salutation is appropriate as well.
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +17
Je vous prie d’agréer, Monsieur les assurances de mon profond respect.
Yours sincerely,


Explanation:
In my view, there's no need to go for a full translation of this as it would be completely archaic in English; I believe you should simply choose a natural, respectful way of signing off a letter.

Paul Malone
France
Local time: 19:27
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jorge Rodrigues
4 mins

agree  Aisha Maniar: yes, or "yours faithfully" if the letter starts "dear sir/madam"
5 mins

agree  Angie Garbarino
6 mins

agree  Angela Dickson
6 mins

agree  Maria Callebaut: yes but also wit Aisha
9 mins

agree  xxxsarahl
17 mins

agree  Michael Bailey: with Aisha
1 hr

agree  writeaway: yours faithfully only for UK English (hasn't made it across the pond as yet)
2 hrs

agree  Charlie Bavington: yes, but only if the person is addressed by name at the "Dear...." beginning, else it has to be yours faithfully (UK)
2 hrs

agree  Patrice
2 hrs

neutral  Karine Gentil: should really be Sincerely Yours, but right idea
3 hrs
  -> Hi Karine, it "should" be Sincerely Yours in American English only, but in any other kind of English (as far as I know) it "should" be Yours Sincerely.

agree  KNielsen
6 hrs

agree  Cristina Butas
11 hrs

agree  Estelle Demontrond-Box
11 hrs

agree  Conor McAuley: Yes, anything more longwinded comes across as pompous and archaic in English
12 hrs

agree  tatyana000
13 hrs

agree  Catherine Christaki
15 hrs

agree  Catherine VIERECK
5 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Je vous prie d’agréer, Monsieur les assurances de mon profond respect.
Sincerely yours / Regards


Explanation:
Either Sincerely yours or regards will work in this case.

Julia Bogdan Rollo
United States
Local time: 10:27
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Angela Dickson: Sincerely yours if the target reader is AE speaker - Regards is not very formal
2 mins
  -> Thank you Angela. FYI, regards, although not as formal, is commonly used in business in the US instead of Sincerely yours. It all depends on the industry, really...

agree  KNielsen
6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Je vous prie d’agréer, Monsieur les assurances de mon profond respect.
Yours faithfully


Explanation:
Dear Sir = Yours faithfully
Dear Mr. X = Yours sincerely

Emma B
Local time: 19:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  KNielsen: For British English
5 hrs

agree  EJP
9 hrs

agree  Catherine Christaki
14 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Je vous prie d’agréer, Monsieur les assurances de mon profond respect.
Sincerely,


Explanation:
This can also be any one of the following [including the one above: Yours truly, I remain (on a seperate line); Sincerely yours; Respectfuly yours; Regards; Kind Regards.. Aa you may have noticed the French salutations are always wordy but English it's to the point. Any one of the above will do for a business letter or introduction letter.

Karine Gentil
United States
Local time: 13:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  KNielsen: We also use this in N. American English
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Je vous prie d’agréer, Monsieur les assurances de mon profond respect.
Respectfully yours/please accept my highest consideration


Explanation:
Respectfully yours/please accept my highest consideration...

Assimina Vavoula
Greece
Local time: 20:27
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
May 18, 2005 - Changes made by writeaway:
FieldArt/Literary » Other


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search