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abondement de l'État

English translation: Government co-contribution

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11:27 Mar 30, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Government / Politics / Pension scheme reform in Europe
French term or phrase: abondement de l'État
Greetings Colleagues.

Well we all know that "abondement" on its own means an employer contribution to a pension scheme, and so it's not hard to guess that this is a government contribution to a pension scheme...in fact, the text tells us so. That's not my problem. I'm inclined to leave the relevant section out, unless I can find a *technical* term for this. Look at the sentence, and you'll see why:

"Certains Etats peuvent compléter ce financement (notamment dans les systèmes d’assurances pension financés essentiellement par les cotisations salariales) par une subvention d’équilibre du régime (l’on parle alors d ‘un « abondement » de l’Etat) ou parce que le système prévoit un mode de financement « tripartite » (salarié(e), entreprise et Etat)."

Funnily enough, this is about public pension schemes, if that makes any difference. If there is a technical term, I'll use it; otherwise I am inclined to leave that parenthetical bit out.

I have considered "state co-payment", but all the Googlies it gets come from Australia (a country noted for its fine translators, but not really relevant over there in the back end of the world).
Richard Benham
France
Local time: 09:08
English translation:Government co-contribution
Explanation:
G'day Richard. Admittedly the only Googles this gets are from Australia, but is there anything intrinsically wrong with this rendering?
Selected response from:

Ian Davies
Australia
Local time: 17:08
Grading comment
Hello Ian. There is nothing wrong with the term, but using would be getting things arse about. In the context, the only point of inserting the parenthesis was to explain a term in use in the less enlightened end of the world. If there is no corresponding English term, used in Europe, and requiring explanation, then it would be better to leave out the parenthesis altogether.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +5government funded top-up contributionAlain Pommet
4Government co-contribution
Ian Davies
3lump sum payment/supplementary contribution
AllegroTrans
2state "top-up" contributionMarc Glinert
1(state) subsidized pension (scheme)
Jonathan MacKerron


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
lump sum payment/supplementary contribution


Explanation:
2 suggestions

AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 45

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Marc Glinert: I'm not terribly happy with "lump sum". That simply denotes that we are not looking at some form of regular payment and if we're propping up a national pension scheme, then we probably are.
14 mins
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
government funded top-up contribution


Explanation:
Lots of ghits for 'top-up' and pensions.

Alain Pommet
Local time: 09:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jonathan MacKerron: "top-up" sounds like it's on the right track
1 min
  -> Thanks Jonathan

agree  Marc Glinert: indeed it does
7 mins
  -> Thanks Marc

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
40 mins
  -> Thanks Vicky

agree  Alison Jenner
3 hrs

agree  Istvan Nagy
10 hrs
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
(state) subsidized pension (scheme)


Explanation:
couple 'o three options

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Note added at 13 mins (2007-03-30 11:40:37 GMT)
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Petit Robert definition for abondement:
"Admin. Addition, augmentation (d'une somme d'argent). — Absolt « L'employeur est libre de compléter ou non les contributions des salariés en versant un “abondement” » (Le Point, 1988)."


Jonathan MacKerron
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 48
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
state "top-up" contribution


Explanation:
G'day Richard (or should that be g'nite?),

I would be inclined to go with the above, which at least fits in with the "compléter" in l1. Hope this helps, mate

Marc




Marc Glinert
Local time: 09:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Government co-contribution


Explanation:
G'day Richard. Admittedly the only Googles this gets are from Australia, but is there anything intrinsically wrong with this rendering?

Example sentence(s):
  • Under the Government's Co-Contribution Scheme, for every $1.00 you invest, the Government will put in another $1.50 up to a maximum of $1,500 a year.

    Reference: http://www.ato.gov.au/superprofessionals/content.asp?doc=/co...
    Reference: http://www.australiansuper.com/resources.ashx/formsandpublic...
Ian Davies
Australia
Local time: 17:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 15
Grading comment
Hello Ian. There is nothing wrong with the term, but using would be getting things arse about. In the context, the only point of inserting the parenthesis was to explain a term in use in the less enlightened end of the world. If there is no corresponding English term, used in Europe, and requiring explanation, then it would be better to leave out the parenthesis altogether.
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