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7ème étage

English translation: 8th Floor

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08:26 Mar 30, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Government / Politics / EU buildings, floor numbering
French term or phrase: 7ème étage
Context:
"Au 7ème étage siège le Médiateur européen."

In Strasbourg, do they have ground floors (like in UK), or do they start with first floors (like in US)?

If I translate into a language that has never had "ground floor", should I render "7ème étage" as "floor #8"?
Valters Feists
Latvia
Local time: 19:18
English translation:8th Floor
Explanation:
in England the ground floor is 1st floor.
Selected response from:

Hacene
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:18
Grading comment
Thanks everyone. To sum this up, my question was about adapting it for cultures in whose languages ground floor is called "floor #1". Therefore the calculation 7+1=8 is valid and even necessary, if the translator *really* wants to be precise. Feel free to comment; I think this is an interesting semi-extralinguistic issue :)
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +77th floorxxxBourth
5 +1keep it 7ème étage
peekay
4 -18th Floor
Hacene


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
7th floor


Explanation:
Unless you're intending to fly an aircraft or launch a rocket into someone's office on the 7th (or 8th) floor, it hardly matters, does it? The person looking for the address will find out when he or she reaches the building.

Since it is written in French, I think it is safe to assume floor numbering complies with French practice, in which "septième étage" is "RdC (rez de chaussée) +7".

xxxBourth
Local time: 18:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 73

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Aisha Maniar
4 mins

agree  Graham macLachlan
11 mins

agree  Gayle Wallimann
19 mins

agree  LilyBart
1 hr

agree  writeaway: where the rocket lands won't matter but telephone/internet lines should go to the right floor ;-)
2 hrs

agree  cjohnstone: i hate lifts (a bit claustrophobic) but will never take this one without a mobile phone or a dictionary!!!
4 hrs

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1 day27 mins
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
keep it 7ème étage


Explanation:
If the source says 7th floor, regardless of the langauge, they are refering to a 7th floor; also there is a term denoting "ground level" in French used in many French-speaking societies. It is called rez-de-chausée.

peekay
Canada
Local time: 12:18
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  1045: You get my vote ... for knowing how to spell "rez-de-chausée".
1 day12 hrs
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
8th Floor


Explanation:
in England the ground floor is 1st floor.

Hacene
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:18
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 25
Grading comment
Thanks everyone. To sum this up, my question was about adapting it for cultures in whose languages ground floor is called "floor #1". Therefore the calculation 7+1=8 is valid and even necessary, if the translator *really* wants to be precise. Feel free to comment; I think this is an interesting semi-extralinguistic issue :)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Marilyn Amouyal: In England the ground floor is the equivalent of the French rez-de-chaussée, one floor up from there is the lst floor. It's American usage that is different.
3 days5 hrs
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