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un auvent sur son pignon

English translation: See discussion below

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22:11 Nov 1, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
History / fortifications
French term or phrase: un auvent sur son pignon
Part of a description about the Dunkirk gate guardroom.

"Le corps de garde de la porte de Dunkerque... a l'originalité de s'ouvrir par un auvent sur son pignon, contrairement aux pratiques normalisées."

I have been thinking along the lines of "s'ouvrir par" meaning "open by (means of)" but how can a guardroom open through a canopy/shelter on its side wall, and why would it want to?

Any help gratefully received.
Peter James
France
Local time: 14:56
English translation:See discussion below
Explanation:
Not being familiar with the particualr building in question, I can only hazard some comments based on the purely linguistic aspects of your question.

I would interpret "s'ouvrir" here as referring to the entrance to, (or way out from), and I presume this 'auvent' is some kind of 'veranda' or covered area — it's hard to know without actually seeing the building, perhaps it even means that an upper storey (if there is one) simply overhangs.

As for 'pignon', I'd be inclined to go for 'end wall'
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 14:56
Grading comment
Eventually went for a sloping roof on the end wall, as a picture seemed to suggest, so thanks for your ideas, Tony, which helped to clarify this for me.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1a porch roof on its side wallemiledgar
3porch roof on gable endjean-jacques alexandre
2 +1See discussion below
Tony M


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
See discussion below


Explanation:
Not being familiar with the particualr building in question, I can only hazard some comments based on the purely linguistic aspects of your question.

I would interpret "s'ouvrir" here as referring to the entrance to, (or way out from), and I presume this 'auvent' is some kind of 'veranda' or covered area — it's hard to know without actually seeing the building, perhaps it even means that an upper storey (if there is one) simply overhangs.

As for 'pignon', I'd be inclined to go for 'end wall'

Tony M
France
Local time: 14:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 65
Grading comment
Eventually went for a sloping roof on the end wall, as a picture seemed to suggest, so thanks for your ideas, Tony, which helped to clarify this for me.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: Was about to make the same comment re. "end wall".
9 hrs
  -> Thanks, Alex!
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
a porch roof on its side wall


Explanation:
The porte, unlike most others of its type, opens by means of a porch roof. An auvent if solid, is a porch roof, if made of cloth is an awning or canopy; in this case it clearly seems to be the solid type.

emiledgar
Belgium
Local time: 14:56
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Miranda Joubioux
4 hrs
  -> Merci.
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
porch roof on gable end


Explanation:
...

jean-jacques alexandre
France
Local time: 14:56
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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