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grêlier

English translation: grêlier (hunting horn)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:grêlier
English translation:grêlier (hunting horn)
Entered by: Miranda Joubioux
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13:54 Apr 3, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - History
French term or phrase: grêlier
Deux blasons ont été conservés : l'un au pignon à l'extérieur portant un écusson soutenu par deux griffons de sable représentant l'aigle impériale éployée aux armes de Kerlazret, l'autre au clocher portant un écusson avec lévrier de sable surmonté d'un grêlier aux armes de Penmorvan de Penfoul

I have managed to find this definition of a "grêlier"

Ancienne pièce d'artillerie qu'on chargeait de balles et de ferrailles, et qui en chassait comme une grêle, lorsqu'elle était tirée.
http://littre.reverso.net/dictionnaire-francais/definition/g...

Not being a specialist in arms, could someone tell me what this is. Would it be a blunderbuss of sorts?
Miranda Joubioux
Local time: 19:30
grêlier
Explanation:
With or without the accent. Specialists will know what it is, presumably. Non-specialists will be as non-plussed as any Frenchman!

Dictionnaire des termes du Blason - G - GeneaWiki
Grêlier : Grand cor de chasse, sans attache et qui fait un tour sur lui-même. Grelots : Petites sonnettes en forme de boule creuses, avec un annelet en haut ...
www.geneawiki.com/index.php/Dictionnaire_des_termes_du_Blas...

Grelier, (fr.): a kind of hunting-horn.
http://www.heraldsnet.org/saitou/parker/Jpframe.htmA [GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED IN HERALDRY
by JAMES PARKER FIRST PUBLISHED in 1894]

Since it's only a KIND OF hunting horn and presumably has no English equivalent, best to leave it as is.

I started off seeking out the names of cannon for shooting grapeshot (a number of small cast iron balls fitted in a case, or frame, so that it could be fired as a whole from a cannon. They were used until displaced by shrapnel in the middle of the 19th century) and hailshot (small bullets fired from cannons, 17th century) which was otherwise more interesting by less likely, as it turns out.
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 19:30
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2grêlierxxxBourth
3 +2hunting hornAlain Pommet
4olifant
schevallier
3cannonliz askew


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
cannon


Explanation:
Pity you didn't have a picture of one:-

http://64.233.183.104/search?q=cache:dsRUjJeMgNAJ:www.dyerla...

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Note added at 8 mins (2008-04-03 14:02:49 GMT)
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See

http://64.233.183.104/search?q=cache:3K9HGK6RJTQJ:www.herald...

under

Guns

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Note added at 10 mins (2008-04-03 14:04:44 GMT)
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OR

culverin

User:Culverin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A culverin is a medieval cannon of relatively long barrel and light construction that fired solid round shot projectiles at long ranges along a flat ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Culverin - 27k - Cached - Similar pages
culverin (cannon) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia
The first category was the culverins, “long” guns with bores on the order of 30 calibres or more. The second was the cannons, or cannon-of-battery, ...
www.britannica.com/eb/topic-146350/culverin - 28k - Cached - Similar pages

liz askew
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  jean-jacques alexandre: caNon//oups so sorry my mistake my soundtrack was stuck in french mode
41 mins
  -> ???"CANNON" Collins Concise English Dictionary. We are talking artillery here, not a member of the Church!!
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30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
hunting horn


Explanation:
This might fit better with the greyhound - pity you don't have a picture.

Grêlier
Au Blason des Armoiries


GRÊLIER. Cor de chasse plus puissant que le cor ordinaire et qui comme lui se représente lié ; il peut-être enguiché et virolé d'un émail spécial.
d'après l'Alphabet et figures de tous les termes du blason
L.-A. Duhoux d'Argicourt — Paris, 1899


GRÊLIER. Voyez Cor de chasse.
d'après le Dictionnaire encyclopédique de la noblesse de France
Nicolas Viton de Saint-Allais (1773-1842) — Paris, 1816


http://www.blason-armoiries.org/heraldique/g/grelier.htm

Alain Pommet
Local time: 19:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jean-jacques alexandre
17 mins
  -> Thanks jean-jacques

agree  Carol Gullidge: this seems more likely, especially as it's talking about heraldry (heraldic arms rather than blunderbusses!). This appears to be in a church...//I googled it and found it in a Breton church (I think!) But I think the heraldic aspect is more relevant
26 mins
  -> Thanks - I hadn't realised it was in a church -still can be an offensive weapon - think of Jericho.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
grêlier


Explanation:
With or without the accent. Specialists will know what it is, presumably. Non-specialists will be as non-plussed as any Frenchman!

Dictionnaire des termes du Blason - G - GeneaWiki
Grêlier : Grand cor de chasse, sans attache et qui fait un tour sur lui-même. Grelots : Petites sonnettes en forme de boule creuses, avec un annelet en haut ...
www.geneawiki.com/index.php/Dictionnaire_des_termes_du_Blas...

Grelier, (fr.): a kind of hunting-horn.
http://www.heraldsnet.org/saitou/parker/Jpframe.htmA [GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED IN HERALDRY
by JAMES PARKER FIRST PUBLISHED in 1894]

Since it's only a KIND OF hunting horn and presumably has no English equivalent, best to leave it as is.

I started off seeking out the names of cannon for shooting grapeshot (a number of small cast iron balls fitted in a case, or frame, so that it could be fired as a whole from a cannon. They were used until displaced by shrapnel in the middle of the 19th century) and hailshot (small bullets fired from cannons, 17th century) which was otherwise more interesting by less likely, as it turns out.


xxxBourth
Local time: 19:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 154
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: Definitely use both: "...a grêlier (hunting horn)..."
28 mins
  -> Belt and braces. And suspenders too!

agree  PB Trans: Agree with Christopher's comment
1 day6 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
olifant


Explanation:
it's english too, and refers to this kind of horn

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Note added at 5 hrs (2008-04-03 19:40:34 GMT)
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OLIFANT. Cor de chasse très puissant que l'on rencontre dans les armoiries, mais qui est plus souvent appelé grêlier.

d'après l'Alphabet et figures de tous les termes du blason
L.-A. Duhoux d'Argicourt — Paris, 1899



schevallier
Local time: 19:30
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Christopher Crockett: Mmmm... an olifant is, technically, only made of (elephant) ivory.
2 hrs
  -> Roland was blowing his olifant when he died in Ronceveaux, to call for help. "Olifant" is used in heraldics, also known under the term "grêlier". And I agree, it is made of ivory. Thank you for your comment
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