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pose biscuit

English translation: biscuit jointing

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:assemblage par biscuit
English translation:biscuit jointing
Entered by: Tony M
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12:10 Mar 7, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Human Resources
French term or phrase: pose biscuit
« La pose biscuit » n’est pas assez reconnue a terme de coefficient

This is on a list of things people would change about their job. I thought 'pose biscuit' meant 'break', but it makes no sense in the context.
TIA
reubenius
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:36
'biscuit'-fitting
Explanation:
Right, then in that case, I think I'm slowly beginning to understand; I think this means that not enough 'weighting' is being given to the fitting of this component that is called a 'biscuit' in the calculation of the coefficients — whether that be pay, productivity, or whatever; perhaps, for example, the employer says it should only take 5 minutes, when in practice it takes 15, and hence, people's productivity figures (and hence bonuses, I bet!) are being disadvantaged if they're unlucky enough to be assigned to work at 'biscuit'-fitting

I'm afraid you'll probably have to ask the client what the specific meaning of 'biscuit' is in their industry, since it's likely to be a specialized term — unless, of course, any of our colleauges are furniture specialists!

Something to do with a round pad of foam...? (like a 'galette de chaise') Who knows?

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Note added at 1 hr (2007-03-07 13:39:18 GMT)
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"so rushed, I haven't even got time to put my biscuit down"? :-)))

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2007-03-07 17:00:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think Claire's hit the (upholstery) nail on the head!

Just look at this:

Mains Dessus : Travail Avenir pour les métiers commerciaux et ...

Jointage au moyen de « biscuits ». Technique d'assemblage des produits de bois ...

mainsdessus.cb.travailavenir.ca/profiles/profile.cfm?site=graphic&lang=fr&noc=7272


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2007-03-07 17:18:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Well, fancy that! It's called a 'biscuit joint' in EN too!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 days (2007-03-12 08:24:15 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

OK, for the sake of completeness, a 'biscuit joint' is used to join two pieces of timber together, usually edge-wise, and involves a groove cut in each piece and a small (usually oval) fillet of thin wood (the 'biscuit') inserted (glued) into the slots in both parts to unite them with accurate positioning. It is a technique used particularly in manufacturing.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 01:36
Grading comment
It always amazes me how proz people can imbue even the most unintelligible bit of text with meaning! Thank you all.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
1 +2'biscuit'-fitting
Tony M
3snack break
Odette Grille
3tea break
Sheila Wilson


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
tea break


Explanation:
I reckon they've made 2 errors - pose=pause and a=comme (or is à possible in French in this context?)

So, my idea for the whole sentence would be "tea breaks aren't given sufficient weighting/importance"



Sheila Wilson
Spain
Local time: 00:36
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 42

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Heartily agree with the importance of bickie-breaks (even though I don't believe that's what they're talking about here).
4 days
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
snack break


Explanation:
...

I think coefficient refers to the level of satisfaction

abd the sentence says that the break is not a major element of satisfaction

Odette Grille
Canada
Local time: 19:36
Works in field
Native speaker of: French
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +2
'biscuit'-fitting


Explanation:
Right, then in that case, I think I'm slowly beginning to understand; I think this means that not enough 'weighting' is being given to the fitting of this component that is called a 'biscuit' in the calculation of the coefficients — whether that be pay, productivity, or whatever; perhaps, for example, the employer says it should only take 5 minutes, when in practice it takes 15, and hence, people's productivity figures (and hence bonuses, I bet!) are being disadvantaged if they're unlucky enough to be assigned to work at 'biscuit'-fitting

I'm afraid you'll probably have to ask the client what the specific meaning of 'biscuit' is in their industry, since it's likely to be a specialized term — unless, of course, any of our colleauges are furniture specialists!

Something to do with a round pad of foam...? (like a 'galette de chaise') Who knows?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-03-07 13:39:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"so rushed, I haven't even got time to put my biscuit down"? :-)))

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2007-03-07 17:00:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think Claire's hit the (upholstery) nail on the head!

Just look at this:

Mains Dessus : Travail Avenir pour les métiers commerciaux et ...

Jointage au moyen de « biscuits ». Technique d'assemblage des produits de bois ...

mainsdessus.cb.travailavenir.ca/profiles/profile.cfm?site=graphic&lang=fr&noc=7272


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2007-03-07 17:18:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Well, fancy that! It's called a 'biscuit joint' in EN too!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 days (2007-03-12 08:24:15 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

OK, for the sake of completeness, a 'biscuit joint' is used to join two pieces of timber together, usually edge-wise, and involves a groove cut in each piece and a small (usually oval) fillet of thin wood (the 'biscuit') inserted (glued) into the slots in both parts to unite them with accurate positioning. It is a technique used particularly in manufacturing.

Tony M
France
Local time: 01:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 91
Grading comment
It always amazes me how proz people can imbue even the most unintelligible bit of text with meaning! Thank you all.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Claire Chapman: So far I'm with you on this one, Tony. My first thought was of the biscuit that joins two pieces of wood but I don't know what that is called in French :-)//Well, now I make that an agree! :-)//Actually, at the time of posting, I did mean French :-)
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Claire! Nice team-work ;-)

agree  Emma Paulay: That's what I call teamwork :-)
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Emma!
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Changes made by editors
Mar 7, 2007 - Changes made by Tony M:
FieldOther » Bus/Financial
Field (specific)Other » Human Resources


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