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souffrance au travail

English translation: Occupational stress

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:souffrance au travail
English translation:Occupational stress
Entered by: Kelly S.
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

16:34 May 19, 2012
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Human Resources / occupational health problems
French term or phrase: souffrance au travail
A list of interests of a University Research Chair includes this entry:
- gestion des ressources humaines (souffrance au travail)


The concept encompasses mnay problems suffered by workers, including sexual and other harassement, discrimination stress.

Is there a similar comprehensive term in English -- all I can think of is 'occupational problems', but I think there must be a more precise term

For more info, see:
http://www.souffrance-et-travail.com/
and
http://www.souffrancetravail.fr/La_souffrance_au_travail.htm...
Joshua Wolfe
Local time: 02:11
Occupational stress
Explanation:
This seems to be the most commonly used term; whereas distress would be the immediate reaction to the stressful situation, stress is the agent causing the reaction
Selected response from:

Kelly S.
Ireland
Local time: 06:11
Grading comment
I was looking for the usual EN term, not an exact translation.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +4Occupational stress
Kelly S.
5 +2Work distressCHAKIB ROULA
4Stress in busines life
Salih1946
3 +1Distress in the workplacereeny
3occupational distress
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
1hardship at the workplace
Daniel Evans
Summary of reference entries provided
Quelle différence y a-t-il entre stress et souffrance au travail ?
Petitavoine

Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Work distress


Explanation:
I have been translating for almost six years,occupational and health related courses and articles and I used to often to come across this phrase in English.In fact, when work distress exceeds its threshold limit ,it leads systematically to "burnout".


    Reference: http://www.workahead.ie/index.php?id=3
    Reference: http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/07/14/perceived-entitlemen...
CHAKIB ROULA
Algeria
Local time: 07:11
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: Or work-related distress, perhaps.
59 mins
  -> Thank you Philgoddard

agree  Annie Batten: Agree but I think work-related distress sounds more natural as Phil suggests.
9 hrs
  -> Thank you Annie
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42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Distress in the workplace


Explanation:
It is "work distress", although I would word it differently....

reeny
Local time: 07:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  veratek
5 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
hardship at the workplace


Explanation:
This is merely an alternative suggestion. I was thinking along the lines of "occupational hardship" and came across "hardship at the workplace" while looking for translations online.

For me, "hardship" would suggest physical/material-related suffering, whereas Chakib Roula's suggestion - "work distress" - would indicate mental/psychological suffering.

Another option could be to use the word "suffering" for "souffrance" (to encompass physical and mental factors), such as "work-related suffering", which is used as a translation of "souffrance au travail" in one of the links below.



Example sentence(s):
  • Do social-economy enterprises have specific features, a specific kind of organization and specific practices that lessen hardship in the workplace?
  • In a context where the institutional prospects of industrial medicine are a cause of concern and where feelings of a lack of esteem have been revived in a profession that, since its origins, has been looking for legitimacy, the category of work-related su

    Reference: http://www.recma.org/node/615
    Reference: http://www.em-consulte.com/article/127597
Daniel Evans
France
Local time: 07:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Occupational stress


Explanation:
This seems to be the most commonly used term; whereas distress would be the immediate reaction to the stressful situation, stress is the agent causing the reaction


    Reference: http://www.deir.qld.gov.au/workplace/subjects/stress/index.h...
Kelly S.
Ireland
Local time: 06:11
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
I was looking for the usual EN term, not an exact translation.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vikki Pendleton: This is definitely the common British English term
41 mins
  -> Thanks, Vikki

neutral  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Stress is more generally recognised as a response to a given situation, thus the other way round. In any event, "souffrance" is what is felt, the mental and physiological reaction, better conveyed by "distress" (which includes stress by the way).
58 mins

agree  veratek
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, veratek

agree  Salih1946
4 hrs
  -> Thanks Salih

agree  Wolf Draeger: Or maybe "stress in the workplace". Souffrance does not mean suffering in this context.
15 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
occupational distress


Explanation:
Distress from the previous suggestions covers "souffrance" which can be psychological, physical, moral etc. "In the workplace" has a nice ring to it - I prefer it for the UK at least - but am unsure of its application in the North American continent.

This term is more than and includes the idea of "stress", which some define as whatever it is which gives rise to neative feeling, others use the term to describe the physiological reaction, aka the stress response. Most of my readings have focussed on the "stress response", but that is no doubt related to the nature of what I have studied. In any event, "distress" really coveys "souffrance".

http://www.collegequarterly.ca/1995-vol03-num02-winter/grant...

"...Stress has been defined differently by various experts. Some define stress as the stimulus, others define it as the response, and still others as the whole spectrum of interacting factors. Probably the best definition for stress is a combination of a stressor and stress reactivity. Occupational distress is the negative effect on the individual from work. "

"Distress: The body adapts to negative stress with disease, poor performance, and impaired interpersonal relationships. This is a harmful stress that may have a noticeable short-term or long-term effect on individuals if they fail to cope with or adapt to the effect of stress."

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Note added at 2 hrs (2012-05-19 19:22:18 GMT)
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A note on "stress". Whether you favour the stress as the agent or as the stress response - the answer no doubt depends on whose point of view you are taking - the French term "souffrance" includes stress, depression, harrassment etc. This provides stronger support for "distress" than "stress" in conveying what is understood by "souffrance".

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 07:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28
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1 day4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Stress in busines life


Explanation:
Alternate definition!

Salih1946
Turkey
Local time: 08:11
Native speaker of: Native in TurkishTurkish
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Reference comments


17 hrs
Reference: Quelle différence y a-t-il entre stress et souffrance au travail ?

Reference information:
Patrick Légeron : Le mot "souffrance" est plutôt la vision des gens qui sont concernés, alors que la "douleur" est un terme médical, et le "stress", plutôt un terme scientifique.

La souffrance est plus le vécu des personnes touchées par le phénomène, mais les experts parlent plus de stress. Au niveau international (cf. les rapports de l'OMS ou du BIT), on parle de stress au travail.

En France, le terme de souffrance a connu beaucoup de succès, mais est beaucoup moins utilisé dans les pays étrangers.


    Reference: http://souffreautravail.canalblog.com/archives/2012/03/10/20...
Petitavoine
Germany
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in category: 8
Note to reference poster
Asker: Merci pour avoir trouvé la phrase clée: "En France, le terme de souffrance a connu beaucoup de succès, mais est beaucoup moins utilisé dans les pays étrangers."

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Changes made by editors
May 21, 2012 - Changes made by Kelly S.:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/75038">Joshua Wolfe's</a> old entry - "souffrance au travail" » "Occupational stress"


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