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remonter au créneau

English translation: take to the battlefield once again

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:remonter au créneau
English translation:take to the battlefield once again
Entered by: Jeanne Zang
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03:05 Apr 25, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
French term or phrase: remonter au créneau
je pense qu'il faudra "remonter au créneau" dans une quinzaine de jours, lorsque l'augmentation de capital sera bien avancée
Jeanne Zang
United States
Local time: 13:23
take to the battlefield once again
Explanation:
Hello,

monter au créneau = to back into battle

It's really about going to the battleground (French is more specific than this and has a few nuances that can't be rendered in the an English translation)

The expression comes from archers who would climb the towers of a castle and shoot arrows from slit windows at the summit while both protecting themselves as well as revealing themselves to their enemies (literally, "to go up to "creneaux [window slits]" to shoot arrows).

So, "to take to the battleground" would be the closest idea in English. Remember, it's "remonter" here, which means "go back up", or "go back to." LOL.

I hope this helps.
Selected response from:

MatthewLaSon
Local time: 13:23
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone. All these answers were good, but I liked this explanation of where the expression comes from. And while I did not have more specific context for this particular text (an email), I know from all the documents I'm working on that it does indeed involve a battle.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
1 +4step back into the breach
Narasimhan Raghavan
3take to the battlefield once againMatthewLaSon
3tackle the issue again
Charles Stanford
2step back into the ring
Conor McAuley
2leap to the defencePTeale


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +4
step back into the breach


Explanation:
monter au créneau means step into the breach as per my Larousse dictionary. HTH.

Narasimhan Raghavan
Local time: 22:53
Native speaker of: Tamil

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Conor McAuley
14 mins
  -> Merci Conor

agree  emiledgar: precisely what it means idiomatically.
2 hrs
  -> Merci Emiledgar

agree  Carol Gullidge: very idiomatic
4 hrs
  -> Merci Carol

agree  Martin Cassell: Very suitable to use this phrase with a little ring of Shakespeare (Henry V) to match the "formule consacrée" of the source. (In fact, if you look closely, both expressions are more defensive in their imagery than the writer probably had in mind ...)
4 hrs
  -> Merci Martin
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
leap to the defence


Explanation:
Just another take.

PTeale
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
tackle the issue again


Explanation:
I think Conor and Narasimhan have both come up with good suggestions. I suppose it depends a bit on what goes before. I have come across "remonter au créneau" used in the sense of "defend one's position", but in light of the rest of the sentence you give, I would probably use "tackle the issue again"

Charles Stanford
Czech Republic
Local time: 19:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
take to the battlefield once again


Explanation:
Hello,

monter au créneau = to back into battle

It's really about going to the battleground (French is more specific than this and has a few nuances that can't be rendered in the an English translation)

The expression comes from archers who would climb the towers of a castle and shoot arrows from slit windows at the summit while both protecting themselves as well as revealing themselves to their enemies (literally, "to go up to "creneaux [window slits]" to shoot arrows).

So, "to take to the battleground" would be the closest idea in English. Remember, it's "remonter" here, which means "go back up", or "go back to." LOL.

I hope this helps.


    Reference: http://www.linternaute.com/expression/langue-francaise/228/m...
MatthewLaSon
Local time: 13:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 30
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone. All these answers were good, but I liked this explanation of where the expression comes from. And while I did not have more specific context for this particular text (an email), I know from all the documents I'm working on that it does indeed involve a battle.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Martin Cassell: observation: crénaux might equally refer to the battlements (though there's little difference figuratively speaking; either way it's an image of defending a stronghold)
2 hrs
  -> Why do you go to battel to begin with? to defend your beliefs, country, or as you say, one's stronghold." The idea is that one is going into battle for sone cause.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
step back into the ring


Explanation:
An alternative. Exact tone and context should help you, a sports analogy might work. There's one in baseball "step back onto the plate" or something like that.

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Note added at 3 hrs (2008-04-25 06:16:47 GMT)
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Or "try again", depending on exact context. Any more context, Jeanne?

Conor McAuley
France
Local time: 19:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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Changes made by editors
Apr 25, 2008 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
FieldOther » Bus/Financial
Field (specific)General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters » Idioms / Maxims / Sayings


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