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Laisse tomber, c'est mort !!!

English translation: like, innit

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01:09 Jul 12, 2008
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Idioms / Maxims / Sayings / Langage courant
French term or phrase: Laisse tomber, c'est mort !!!
J'entends cette expression tous les jours et toute la journée avec mes enfants et leurs copains. Ca commence à m'énerver, car toutes les phrases contiennent "laisse tomber", même si la situation est joyeuse.
Exemple : "j'ai acheté des super chaussures, laisse tomber, elles sont trop bien, j'adore !!!".
"Mais j'avais pas assez d'argent pour acheter un ticket de train pour voir mon pote, là c'est mort"...

Et aussi "on est allé à une soirée, c'était trop de la looz"...

Ca, c'est le jargon des jeunes et j'aimerais bien savoir comment on dit ça en anglais. Car ça m'arrive de leur parler dans la langue de Shakespeare, et là, ce charmant homme ferait des bonds dans sa tombe.....

Vive la jeunesse !

Merci si vous avez des idées. Ce serait marrant pour moi.
Catherine CHAUVIN
France
Local time: 14:29
English translation:like, innit
Explanation:
This seems to be pretty much urban slang, and fairly meaningless.

Some people pepper their speech with "like": "I got these gorgeous shoes, like, and ..."

"Innit" is often tagged on to the end of a sentence or phrase

For a sort of explanation, see http://www.bbc.co.uk/voices/yourvoice/conversation3.shtml
Selected response from:

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:29
Grading comment
Génial ! J'ai bien rigolé avec toutes les réponses des collègues aussi. Ta version explique bien le "nonsense" de la phrase. (Meaningless).
Je ne peux pas l'entrer dans le glossaire like, car ma question était trop particulière, innit ? Ce serait trop de la looz. En fait, ce serait mort, quoi ! :-)
Merci trop, koa !
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +4like, innit
Carol Gullidge
5Oh my God !tralamode
4 +1It's wicked!/It's really bad!/It's cool!
Helen Shiner
4 +1too bad / tough / (need I say more)
Tony M
3 +2Forget itc_rouizi
4how about "cool, man!" (for laisse tomber) and "it's a killer" (for c'est mort)xxxLoyd
3drop it, it's dead!xxxSpeakering


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
drop it, it's dead!


Explanation:
we do say drop it in English, not sure if it's the same context though.

xxxSpeakering
Native speaker of: Native in MacedonianMacedonian, Native in Serbo-CroatSerbo-Croat
Notes to answerer
Asker: Merci, c'était une bonne idée.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  markworthy: asker probably knows that
2 hrs

neutral  Martin Cassell: asker clearly requested idiomatic equivalents (not literal) -- I haven't heard, and can't imagine, this being said except in a completely literal context
3 hrs
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
too bad / tough / (need I say more)


Explanation:
Catherine, I think that there are probably not exactly parallel 'yoofspeek' expressions that would fit in all cases; you can really only translate on a case-by-case basis, in the individual situations. The informal, highly dynamic language of young people is by jnature pretty unstructured, and I think we would be naïve if we thought any kind of real one-to-one equivalence existed in most cases, at least. What I think is funny is the way young people pick up on EN words from songs, films, etc., and then adapt them to suit their own needs — just as I do when short of a word in FR that has just the right tone for what I need to express on the spur of the moment. I have had great success with my invented verb 'pinguer', meaning 'to pop it in the microwave'!

In the case of 'laisse tomber', the way I hear it being used all the time by my young friends, in the negative sense at least, I think expressions along the lines of 'too bad', 'tought', etc. need to be carefully selected for the context.

I've not actually encountered it used very much in a positive sense, more neutral, really, but only in the sense of 'need I say more?' — although off course I'm not seriously suggesting that as being the equivalent 'djeunz' register!

Regarding 'looz', and the verb 'loozer', this is apparently derived from the EN noun 'loser', but converted to mean 'hanging around in a generally aimless fashion feeling bored' — usually, because incapable of doing anything else after a heavy night the night before. "Tu t'es couché à quelle heure samedi ?" – "à cinq heures du mat... et j'ai loozé toute la journée dimanche !"

Again, I don't know what the equivalent EN expression would be in this, or your own context; 'veg out' is certainly one possibility, though wouldn't fit in the sentence you've quoted, of course.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2008-07-12 08:23:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Like Juan, my feeble attempts at joining in and using these words myself are usually greeted with puzzled or derisory smiles!

Tony M
France
Local time: 14:29
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
Notes to answerer
Asker: Super ! Tu es intarissable sur cette question. J'ai bien rigolé. Merci.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Martin Cassell: wikkid! // er, not very, I'm sure!
1 hr
  -> How kewl R U, Martin?!
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Forget it


Explanation:
"Forget it" for "laisse tomber" but only in certain contexts... As for "c'est mort" that can also mean "forget it" or "don't bother." Can't think of an English equivalent of mortel but my brother and all his pals (Liverpool, UK) say "class" to mean the same thing.

I think looz comes from loser, maybe I'm wrong though!

This makes me feel so old!

c_rouizi
Local time: 14:29
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Merci, j'ai souvent entendu ta version aussi.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
1 hr

neutral  Martin Cassell: not sure that "laisse tomber" is used in this meaning in the "yoof-speak" described by the asker, and certainly not in her first example
1 hr

agree  Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
5 hrs
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
like, innit


Explanation:
This seems to be pretty much urban slang, and fairly meaningless.

Some people pepper their speech with "like": "I got these gorgeous shoes, like, and ..."

"Innit" is often tagged on to the end of a sentence or phrase

For a sort of explanation, see http://www.bbc.co.uk/voices/yourvoice/conversation3.shtml

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:29
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 47
Grading comment
Génial ! J'ai bien rigolé avec toutes les réponses des collègues aussi. Ta version explique bien le "nonsense" de la phrase. (Meaningless).
Je ne peux pas l'entrer dans le glossaire like, car ma question était trop particulière, innit ? Ce serait trop de la looz. En fait, ce serait mort, quoi ! :-)
Merci trop, koa !

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Excellent, like! Am I bovver'd?
4 mins
  -> thanks Tony :))

agree  Martin Cassell: yeah, cool, naameen?
15 mins
  -> thanks Martin, more for the list!

agree  Assimina Vavoula
1 hr
  -> thanks Assimina!

agree  Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
3 hrs
  -> thanks Harald!
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
It's wicked!/It's really bad!/It's cool!


Explanation:
'Wicked' generally said without the 'it's'. 'Really bad' meaning the opposite (in oldie speak). 'Cool' still used a lot (thank goodness for some intergenerational communication!)

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Merci beaucoup !


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Martin Cassell: well wikkid!
6 mins
  -> or, indeed, well bad!
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Laisse tomber
Oh my God !


Language variant: US English

Explanation:
As in : Oh (pause), my (pause), god (pause). Used by girls 13-28 in the States to express, for example, how unbelievably amazing they find a pair of shoes to be. Only for when "laisse tomber" means "there is no way to possibly understand how great this is, so don't even try"


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valley_Girl
tralamode
United States
Local time: 08:29
Native speaker of: English
Notes to answerer
Asker: Merci pour ta version américaine.

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5 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
how about "cool, man!" (for laisse tomber) and "it's a killer" (for c'est mort)


Explanation:
On entend ces expressions anglaises parmi les jeunes dans des circonstances, telles que vous avez decrites.

Example sentence(s):
  • "Cool, man! Dig your jacket" (dig = I like it) ; "Can't believe they've sold out (the shop has sold all it's stock) of those trainers! It's a killer!"
xxxLoyd
Local time: 13:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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Changes made by editors
Jul 12, 2008 - Changes made by Tony M:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO


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