KudoZ home » French to English » Insurance

cabinet d'expertises

English translation: (licensed) appraisers (US), (chartered) surveyors (UK) - buildings

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:cabinet d'expertises
English translation:(licensed) appraisers (US), (chartered) surveyors (UK) - buildings
Entered by: Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

10:10 Mar 15, 2002
French to English translations [PRO]
Insurance / Insurance
French term or phrase: cabinet d'expertises
This is for an insurance company. "La CompagnieXXXa missionné le cabinet d'expertises XXX, qui a été amené à constater les désordres." Expert consultancy does not seem to be the right term here.
Gayle Wallimann
Local time: 16:03
(licensed) appraisers
Explanation:
They are legally licensed appraisers. I suppoose that you could also call them "insurance adjusters", but the correct term is appraisers.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-15 12:25:48 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As in these examples...

... Vincent Matringe, building appraiser, offers you three types of services : ... about
this Web site. Copyright © 1999 Cabinet d\'expertises Vincent Matringe Last ...
perso.wanadoo.fr/vincent.matringe/Anglais/products.htm

DOC] RECEIVERSHIP PROCEEDINGS IN FRANCE
Format de fichier: Microsoft Word 2000 - Version HTML
... Copies of leases. Copies of insurance policies (comprehensive, vehicle, etc.). Minutes
of ... of an inventory by an appraiser appointed by the Official Receiver ...
www.acou.fr/doc/NOTEDIRgb2.doc
Selected response from:

Steven Geller
Local time: 16:03
Grading comment
I believe that this is the closest to the term needed. Thank you Steve for the references, I checked them and they do seem to go with the context, appraising damages on contstruction sites.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +3consultant firm, consulting company
GILOU
4 +1*** firm , firm of loss adjusters, public adjusters
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
4 +1(licensed) appraisers
Steven Geller
4Adjusting bureau
Olivier San Léandro


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
consultant firm, consulting company


Explanation:
voilà

GILOU
France
Local time: 16:03
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 26

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  diabolo: or simply:consultants
29 mins

agree  Dr. Chrys Chrystello
59 mins

agree  nzbirciog
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Adjusting bureau


Explanation:
Il s'agit, je suppose, d'un cabinet d'expertise de dégats, et non pas d'expertise comptable.
Je pense donc que "adjusting bureau" correspond bien.

Ref: GDT

HTH, Olivier


Olivier San Léandro
Local time: 16:03
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 2
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
*** firm , firm of loss adjusters, public adjusters


Explanation:
Well, the short answer is "it depends", which is not much help to you, however true it might be! It all depends on what type of expert is being instructed.

If the damage being assessed concerns a vessel, then it would be nautical/maritime surveyor for example. (Sorry if this makes me a "boat-bore", but I prefer to talk about what I know about.)

If you're talking about major storm damage to property, then it may be "loss adjuster", "public adjuster". May even be a plain old "claims representative". Without more info, difficult to say.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-15 13:20:10 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

What follows applies to the UK. I understand that you are American, based in France but I do not know where your target reader is based.

As it is now apparent that buildings are concerned, then for the UK, this would be \"firm of surveyors\". Surveyors are sometimes called in to assess damage* to buildings. (As a general rule, most house sales are done with each side instructing surveyors. Without a survey report, you will generally not be able to get a mortgage. Every house owner in the UK knows about surveyors.)

The governing professional body in the UK is the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (www.rics.org.uk) and you might consider the AEEBC - Association d\'Experts Européens du Bâtiment et de la Construction a suitable French counterpart.

When working in civil litigation, the case portfolio I worked on included a number of negligent surveyors.

(* should be in the singular here, \"damages\" being \"dommages & intérêts\")

This above information is being posted with the sole intention of assisting the asker in the event of her target reader being UK-based, the information that the question concerned buildings not having been apparent until the asker posted a comment when grading the question.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-15 14:25:33 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Whilst the context, I am told, is US, I have included the UK version for the benefit of the glossaries.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-15 14:28:11 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

For info, both \"mind the gap\" and \"watch your step\" are used in the UK, the latter benefitting from more than one meaning.

I\'ve learnt a lot from this question - thank you!


Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 16:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 109

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  cheungmo: Exactly: it depends.
1 hr
  -> Apparently it's for buildings, so in the UK we would call them (chartered) surveyors : www.rics.org.uk
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
(licensed) appraisers


Explanation:
They are legally licensed appraisers. I suppoose that you could also call them "insurance adjusters", but the correct term is appraisers.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-15 12:25:48 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As in these examples...

... Vincent Matringe, building appraiser, offers you three types of services : ... about
this Web site. Copyright © 1999 Cabinet d\'expertises Vincent Matringe Last ...
perso.wanadoo.fr/vincent.matringe/Anglais/products.htm

DOC] RECEIVERSHIP PROCEEDINGS IN FRANCE
Format de fichier: Microsoft Word 2000 - Version HTML
... Copies of leases. Copies of insurance policies (comprehensive, vehicle, etc.). Minutes
of ... of an inventory by an appraiser appointed by the Official Receiver ...
www.acou.fr/doc/NOTEDIRgb2.doc


Steven Geller
Local time: 16:03
PRO pts in category: 15
Grading comment
I believe that this is the closest to the term needed. Thank you Steve for the references, I checked them and they do seem to go with the context, appraising damages on contstruction sites.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Yes. In the UK these are (chartered) surveyors.
1 hr
  -> The question was not about the UK, a nation that still runs on quaint little expressions left over from the Victorian era (or earlier) like "mind the gap", instead of "watch your step"
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search