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gré en gré

English translation: no fuss claims

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13:45 Dec 6, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Insurance
French term or phrase: gré en gré
From promotional literature for a home insurance provider.
Is there a standard way to phrase this in terms of insurance?

Le remboursement en "gré en gré".
Un dégât des eaux, un début d'incendie, une porte- fenêtre brisée : si les dommages sont inférieurs à 2 280 euros (15 000 francs) et que vous souhaitez faire vous-même les réparations, XXXXX peut dorénavant, sans expertise et sur simple appel téléphonique, vous adresser un chèque du montant correspondant au coût des matériaux pour les réparations.
egunn
Local time: 21:54
English translation:no fuss claims
Explanation:
If this is for a promotional brochure for the general public, then maybe "no fuss" might fit.
Basically, what they are saying is that for small sums, they are making life simpler for the policy holder. The p/h tells them how much it costs to fix the damage, and they pay up with a minimum of fuss - no obtaining 2 or 3 different estimates in writing, no waiting for assessors to visit to assess the damage, etc.

With the information given, there appears to be no negotiation involved. These are most definitely not goodwill or ex-gratia payments, since the p/h is covered for the loss sustained (presumably!) and these 2 terms refer to payments made for which the insurer is not really liable.

Anyway, "no fuss" is what it means, maybe I'll think of a more formal term in a minute..... :-)
Selected response from:

Charlie Bavington
Local time: 21:54
Grading comment
I think this suggestion works perfectly. Many thanks to everyone for the different suggestions and comments.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6by (mutual) agreement
GILOU
3 +2settlement by negotiation
writeaway
3 +1no fuss claimsCharlie Bavington
4ex gratia paymentsxxxBourth
3'goodwill'
Charlotte Allen


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
by (mutual) agreement


Explanation:
-

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Note added at 2004-12-06 13:47:16 (GMT)
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Harraps

GILOU
France
Local time: 22:54
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 26

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: or "amicable"
28 mins

agree  VRN
32 mins

agree  writeaway
34 mins

agree  cjohnstone: but sure it is gré A gré pas gré EN gré
53 mins

agree  Assimina Vavoula
5 hrs

agree  DocteurPC: it is gré à gré - see GDT (that time it's right)
8 hrs
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
gré en gré
'goodwill'


Explanation:
There doesn't seem to be a standard phrase for this - basically the insurers are offering to allow the insured person to authorise their own repairs if the costs are going to be below a certain level, rather than going through the whole process of submitting estimates, getting these approved etc.

It will completely depend on the context and your client's wishes, but if you need a literal translation, go with the one above.

On the other hand, a business-y equivalent here would be 'Goodwill', but you would want to put it in quotes to avoid confusion with the more specific financial meaning (in UK at least) of the term goodwill.

Charlotte Allen
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:54
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 31

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Charlie Bavington: your analysis of the meaning is spot on, but I really don't think you should use goodwill, even in quotes, 'cos it's misleading - ceteris paribus, the insurer IS still nonetheless obliged to pay the claim.
2 hrs
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43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
gré en gré
settlement by negotiation


Explanation:
just to add to the fun. this ref. is specifically for insurance and is in Business, Legal dico.

writeaway
Local time: 22:54
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 35

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: yes
34 mins

agree  JackieMcC
19 hrs
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32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
gré en gré
ex gratia payments


Explanation:
While not a Latinist, the etymology gré/gratia looks good.

It might not be exactly the same thing, maybe, but close enough for the message to get across.

That is playing into the hands of the insurance company. It is precisely what they would like you to think and do. It is only when they are taken to task that they will look at your claim more favourably. It takes time coupled with a logical and structured approach to the claim. Just as the insurance companies employ trained and experienced people to look after their interests it is only right that you should tackle the insurance company from a similarly vantaged position. In this fashion they are often persuaded to view the realities and change their minds. In some cases they will even make an EX-GRATIA payment where the facts and commercial realities are such that an AMICABLE AGREEMENT is the best solution to the claim.
[http://www.noiitaliani.com/insurance_claims.htm]

Ex Gratia Payments: If Insurer makes ex gratia (Insurer has no legal liability, but settlement to maintain good relations) payments to Insured, reinsurer is under no obligation to reimburse him
[http://www.perfectgoods.com/insurance/k_practice_3.asp]


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Note added at 33 mins (2004-12-06 14:18:48 GMT)
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More or less literally means \"as a favour\".

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Note added at 37 mins (2004-12-06 14:22:54 GMT)
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Yup, \"gré\" from \"gratum, gratus = agréable\".

More legalistically you might say \"out of court settlement\", or ex gratia per RB, \"out-of-court settlement\".

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Note added at 42 mins (2004-12-06 14:27:33 GMT)
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Or FAST-TRACK PAYMENT/SETTLEMENT, maybe:

INSURANCE AND ACCIDENT CONSULTATION SERVICES
Insurance Adjustment Services
The following services are provided to resolve issues related to accidents as quickly and smoothly as possible.
s Fast-Track Payment Service for Automobile Insurance Claims
A simplified payment service is offered to speed up payments in most cases where the amount of damage is less than ¥3 million



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Note added at 1 hr 33 mins (2004-12-06 15:19:02 GMT)
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Should be \"gré à gré\" of course = \"à l\'amiable, d\'un commun accord\" [Lexis]

xxxBourth
Local time: 22:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 77

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Charlie Bavington: don't like ex gratia, since the insurer is still liable to pay the claim. The "fast track" that you quote might work well on promotional literature, though.
2 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
gré en gré
no fuss claims


Explanation:
If this is for a promotional brochure for the general public, then maybe "no fuss" might fit.
Basically, what they are saying is that for small sums, they are making life simpler for the policy holder. The p/h tells them how much it costs to fix the damage, and they pay up with a minimum of fuss - no obtaining 2 or 3 different estimates in writing, no waiting for assessors to visit to assess the damage, etc.

With the information given, there appears to be no negotiation involved. These are most definitely not goodwill or ex-gratia payments, since the p/h is covered for the loss sustained (presumably!) and these 2 terms refer to payments made for which the insurer is not really liable.

Anyway, "no fuss" is what it means, maybe I'll think of a more formal term in a minute..... :-)

Charlie Bavington
Local time: 21:54
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 56
Grading comment
I think this suggestion works perfectly. Many thanks to everyone for the different suggestions and comments.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charlotte Allen: Perfect. You seem to have a knack for coming up with exactly the right word.
1 day36 mins
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