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bascule à blanc, bascule réelle

English translation: dummy run, live run

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21:06 Apr 8, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - IT (Information Technology) / Data migration
French term or phrase: bascule à blanc, bascule réelle
Assistance au déploiement (*bascule à blanc, bascule réelle*, surveillance renforcée)
Gordon Mackenzie
Local time: 04:14
English translation:dummy run, live run
Explanation:
bascule - usually means switchover from one system to another, I would guess here it means switching from the system migrated from to the system migrated to. However, it is not impossible that it is a reference to the data migration, or indeed the migration + switchover. Fuller context will tell you that.

à blanc - dummy run, practice run, dress rehearsal (does get used in IT contexts) that kind of idea. As against the real thing. Again, the fuller context will tell you whether it is just a going through the motions without actually doing it, or indeed whether they are going to do it, e.g. to nail down the timing, and then roll back/regress afterwards

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Note added at 12 hrs (2008-04-09 09:44:48 GMT)
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If I remember correctly, the last big data migration I was involved in, in the summer of 2004, after a sluggish start to my career as a freelance (!), they called it a dress rehearsal. This involved closing the system down on Thursday night to give them 3 days - it was a big ol' system! And yes, we found bugs and stuff, so it was a worthwhile exercise.

But while DR is actually used and acceptable (IMHO), I can see that some clients *could* think it sounds flippant or unprofessional in some way, in which case I would opt for "dummy run".

The theatrical metaphor is not extended - we didn't call the "live run" "first night" or "curtain up" or anything ! I seem to recall we called it D-Day, as it happens, because it was the culmination of months of work. I would stick with "live run", or, possibly, if you are sure it IS the migration, "live migration" - we do tend to be a little more specific than our gallic chums sometimes.
Selected response from:

Charlie Bavington
Local time: 04:14
Grading comment
Thank you for your help. It sounds good, but mind you, there are no google hits for "dummy run, live run"as a phrase...
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4dummy run, live runCharlie Bavington
4planning, implementation/roll out, tracking
raj_gup


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
planning, implementation/roll out, tracking


Explanation:
Typical migration deployment strategy....actually any project strategy
:-).

hope this helps.


    Reference: http://www.sei.cmu.edu/pub/documents/01.reports/pdf/01tn012....
raj_gup
United States
Local time: 22:14
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
dummy run, live run


Explanation:
bascule - usually means switchover from one system to another, I would guess here it means switching from the system migrated from to the system migrated to. However, it is not impossible that it is a reference to the data migration, or indeed the migration + switchover. Fuller context will tell you that.

à blanc - dummy run, practice run, dress rehearsal (does get used in IT contexts) that kind of idea. As against the real thing. Again, the fuller context will tell you whether it is just a going through the motions without actually doing it, or indeed whether they are going to do it, e.g. to nail down the timing, and then roll back/regress afterwards

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 hrs (2008-04-09 09:44:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If I remember correctly, the last big data migration I was involved in, in the summer of 2004, after a sluggish start to my career as a freelance (!), they called it a dress rehearsal. This involved closing the system down on Thursday night to give them 3 days - it was a big ol' system! And yes, we found bugs and stuff, so it was a worthwhile exercise.

But while DR is actually used and acceptable (IMHO), I can see that some clients *could* think it sounds flippant or unprofessional in some way, in which case I would opt for "dummy run".

The theatrical metaphor is not extended - we didn't call the "live run" "first night" or "curtain up" or anything ! I seem to recall we called it D-Day, as it happens, because it was the culmination of months of work. I would stick with "live run", or, possibly, if you are sure it IS the migration, "live migration" - we do tend to be a little more specific than our gallic chums sometimes.

Charlie Bavington
Local time: 04:14
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 304
Grading comment
Thank you for your help. It sounds good, but mind you, there are no google hits for "dummy run, live run"as a phrase...
Notes to answerer
Asker: It is most likely referring to the data migration: so would you still in that context translate it as "dummy, live run"?


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: My interpretation also, based on the words alone, knowing sba about the field.
11 mins

agree  raj_gup: accurately put...it depends on the context.
28 mins

agree  Emma Paulay: ditto Bourth
8 hrs

agree  Esther Lavedrine
8 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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