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tracés ... traces

English translation: logged ... logs

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09:15 Jul 2, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - IT (Information Technology)
French term or phrase: tracés ... traces
"Les accès sont **tracés** à la fois sur les firewalls XXX, YYY et ZZZ et sur le router. Ces **traces** sont disponibles pour permettre un audit des accès...".

Still on my IT security systems document. Not being an IT specialist, I am confused about when to use "log", "monitor", "trace" ... . I have seen previous related KudoZ questions, but they don't seem to address this. My own feeling is to use "monitored" and "traces" respectively, but this is probably wrong??
B D Finch
France
Local time: 22:01
English translation:logged ... logs
Explanation:
I work in IT, and specifically I've been studying security lately (planning on setting up a FreeBSD server one of these days...) - and the terms "to log" (v) and "log" (n) are fairly common.

A "log" is a listing (usually time-stamped) of events that occurred - often events happening at more or less unpredictable intervals and originating from an external source or external sources (such as attempts to access a resource such as a server or a disk, reads or writes to a file, programs starting and stopping, etc.).

A "trace" is slightly different: it is a listing of all the steps executed by a *single* program, used for the purposes of debugging. A "trace" is a bit more focuses and self-contained than a "log" because a "trace" simply lists all the operations which a single program performed - rather than listing a bunch of events which could have originated from various sources. In particular, for a deterministic program, running it twice (using the same inputs or arguments) should produce identical traces. A trace can be used by the programmer for debugging purposes, to step through a program and see what it's doing wrong (or right).

A log for a single, particular, unvarying process might produce the same results each time the process was run - but in the general case you would not expect to find two logs to be identical, since what they are keeping track of is a kind of history of what happened in a situation which more often than not is non-deterministic because it can involve multiple agents interacting in unpredictable ways - which is precisely why it's interesting to keep a log of what happened, so you can back and do an audit of what went on.

The verb "to monitor" pertains to watching a program or an operation while it is executing, or some other events while they happening. This is used more in a 'live' sense and there is really no noun to refer to its results ("a monitoring"??) although you could use the noun "monitor" to refer to the program or component which is actually performing this monitoring.

If you bring up the Windows Task Manager and click on the Performance tab, you will see an example of a "monitor" - there are some graphs (sliding slowly leftwards in time) showing ongoing CPU (central processing unit) and PF (page file) usage. This example shows that a "monitor" typically "monitors" events which are fleeting and ongoing and where you're not really interested in going back and examining the past - you're just interested in watching what's going on in the present, and there's no way to do an audit.

Another point which should be mentioned is that since you have "tracés ... traces" in the original, then you should also have a verb and a noun derived from a single root in the English ("logged... logs"). So I would definitely *not* use "monitored" and "traces" since they are totally different words from different roots.

So this is my long-winded explanation of why "logged...logs" would be best!






--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 days18 hrs (2008-07-05 03:26:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo:

A "trace" is a bit more focuses
SHOULD READ
A "trace" is a bit more focused
Selected response from:

Donald Scott Alexander
Local time: 21:01
Grading comment
Thanks Scott for your very useful and full explanation of the English terms; though e.g. "(the) monitoring of xxx produced inconclusive results/took place over several days ..." is a fairly common use of monitoring as noun. For some reason it doesn't seem to take the indefinite article.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4logged ... logsDonald Scott Alexander


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


2 days18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
logged ... logs


Explanation:
I work in IT, and specifically I've been studying security lately (planning on setting up a FreeBSD server one of these days...) - and the terms "to log" (v) and "log" (n) are fairly common.

A "log" is a listing (usually time-stamped) of events that occurred - often events happening at more or less unpredictable intervals and originating from an external source or external sources (such as attempts to access a resource such as a server or a disk, reads or writes to a file, programs starting and stopping, etc.).

A "trace" is slightly different: it is a listing of all the steps executed by a *single* program, used for the purposes of debugging. A "trace" is a bit more focuses and self-contained than a "log" because a "trace" simply lists all the operations which a single program performed - rather than listing a bunch of events which could have originated from various sources. In particular, for a deterministic program, running it twice (using the same inputs or arguments) should produce identical traces. A trace can be used by the programmer for debugging purposes, to step through a program and see what it's doing wrong (or right).

A log for a single, particular, unvarying process might produce the same results each time the process was run - but in the general case you would not expect to find two logs to be identical, since what they are keeping track of is a kind of history of what happened in a situation which more often than not is non-deterministic because it can involve multiple agents interacting in unpredictable ways - which is precisely why it's interesting to keep a log of what happened, so you can back and do an audit of what went on.

The verb "to monitor" pertains to watching a program or an operation while it is executing, or some other events while they happening. This is used more in a 'live' sense and there is really no noun to refer to its results ("a monitoring"??) although you could use the noun "monitor" to refer to the program or component which is actually performing this monitoring.

If you bring up the Windows Task Manager and click on the Performance tab, you will see an example of a "monitor" - there are some graphs (sliding slowly leftwards in time) showing ongoing CPU (central processing unit) and PF (page file) usage. This example shows that a "monitor" typically "monitors" events which are fleeting and ongoing and where you're not really interested in going back and examining the past - you're just interested in watching what's going on in the present, and there's no way to do an audit.

Another point which should be mentioned is that since you have "tracés ... traces" in the original, then you should also have a verb and a noun derived from a single root in the English ("logged... logs"). So I would definitely *not* use "monitored" and "traces" since they are totally different words from different roots.

So this is my long-winded explanation of why "logged...logs" would be best!






--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 days18 hrs (2008-07-05 03:26:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo:

A "trace" is a bit more focuses
SHOULD READ
A "trace" is a bit more focused


Donald Scott Alexander
Local time: 21:01
Does not meet criteria
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 10
Grading comment
Thanks Scott for your very useful and full explanation of the English terms; though e.g. "(the) monitoring of xxx produced inconclusive results/took place over several days ..." is a fairly common use of monitoring as noun. For some reason it doesn't seem to take the indefinite article.
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