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nez sur le guidon

English translation: blinkered

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10:28 Aug 30, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Journalism
French term or phrase: nez sur le guidon
what does this phrase mean, please?
NICKY AGATE
Local time: 13:13
English translation:blinkered
Explanation:
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Note added at 5 mins (2006-08-30 10:33:56 GMT)
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http://www.bartleby.com/61/56/B0325600.html

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Note added at 4 hrs (2006-08-30 14:50:20 GMT)
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Avoir le nez dans le guidon, être particulièrement affairé, ne pas prêter attention à ce qui se fait autour de soi.

http://www.patrimoine-de-france.org/mots/mots-acade-64-31511...

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Note added at 4 hrs (2006-08-30 14:52:15 GMT)
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To me, "nose to the grindstone" simply means working very hard.

http://english1010.com/nose_to_the_grindstone.htm

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Note added at 4 hrs (2006-08-30 15:08:38 GMT)
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lacking in perspective, if you prefer.

The expression is used in a number of ways. Difficult to say which one applies in your case without the context.
Selected response from:

Dr Sue Levy
Local time: 19:13
Grading comment
this works best in the context i think. thanks.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5nose to the grindstone
Paul Hirsh
5is down to businessMatthewLaSon
4blinkeredDr Sue Levy


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
nose to the grindstone


Explanation:
in complement to sue's answer, it also means too busy to look from side to side

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Note added at 9 mins (2006-08-30 10:37:49 GMT)
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guidon is the handlebars of a bike, so it could also mean top speed like when you put your nose to it to minimise wind drag

Paul Hirsh
France
Local time: 19:13
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sandra Petch: I've often heard "la tête dans le guidon" used in this sense so I would imagine "nez" works too!
3 mins
  -> Thanks Sandra!

agree  xxxsarahl
1 hr
  -> Thanks Sarah!

agree  Alison Jenner
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Alison!

agree  NancyLynn
3 hrs
  -> Thanks Nancy!

agree  Ingeborg Gowans
4 hrs
  -> Thanks Ingeborg !
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1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
blinkered


Explanation:
---

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2006-08-30 10:33:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.bartleby.com/61/56/B0325600.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2006-08-30 14:50:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Avoir le nez dans le guidon, être particulièrement affairé, ne pas prêter attention à ce qui se fait autour de soi.

http://www.patrimoine-de-france.org/mots/mots-acade-64-31511...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2006-08-30 14:52:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To me, "nose to the grindstone" simply means working very hard.

http://english1010.com/nose_to_the_grindstone.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2006-08-30 15:08:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

lacking in perspective, if you prefer.

The expression is used in a number of ways. Difficult to say which one applies in your case without the context.

Dr Sue Levy
Local time: 19:13
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 3
Grading comment
this works best in the context i think. thanks.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Paul Hirsh: pretty good equivalent
3 mins
  -> thanks! Depends on the context really, whether it's simply "head down, tail up" or having a narrow view

disagree  Francis Marche: "blinkered" for "having a narrow view" would be "porter des oeillères" in French and is a different meaning altogether
4 hrs
  -> the expression is definitely used to suggest lack of perspective - perhaps "blinkered" is not quite right
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17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
is down to business


Explanation:
Hello,

This means that the person is making a concentrated effort to reach an end. It works very well as a translation for this French idiom.

I hope this helps.

Example sentence(s):
  • The race car driver is down to business in the last four laps.
MatthewLaSon
Local time: 13:13
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
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