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statut particulier

English translation: terms of appointment

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15:38 Jun 16, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s) / Employment law terms
French term or phrase: statut particulier
From a Tunisian law on health care:

"Les personnels à plein temps des établissements sanitaires privés doivent être liés à l’établissement dont ils relèvent, soit par contrat, soit par un statut particulier."

In French Law (and seemingly Tunisian Law too) a distinction is made between employees who have a 'contrat de travail' and those whose jobs are governed by 'statut' (usually public servants). After extensive research, I have failed to find a way to express this, although I initially tried to get around it by referring to 'special status'. But the 'statut' is, I think, a legal instrument, if not an actual document (rather than a condition of the person), and I need a concrete word expressing that. Has anyone encountered this before?

Any help appreciated. Also, please see my question (to follow) related to this one.
Charlotte Allen
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:15
English translation:terms of appointment
Explanation:
I'm not how you say this, but it refers to having a particular "office", as some form of civil servant.

I know this from my university teaching experience: many positions are filled by decree, which sets out the terms of the appointment and names the appointees.
The positions can be short-term or permanent, but the main point is that the terms of "employment" are not fixed in any ordinary employment contract (raison d'état oblige...).
People in such positions can (and often do) then talk about having a "status". As opposed to the lowly assistants etc. who don't.

And I think this is the meaning here.
Selected response from:

Christopher RH
Local time: 16:15
Grading comment
Perfect, thanks a million.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4legislation
Patrice
3specific legal statusSarah Walls
3terms of appointmentChristopher RH


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
legislation


Explanation:
This might work. Vague but conveys the meaning of legal provision.

Patrice
United States
Local time: 07:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
terms of appointment


Explanation:
I'm not how you say this, but it refers to having a particular "office", as some form of civil servant.

I know this from my university teaching experience: many positions are filled by decree, which sets out the terms of the appointment and names the appointees.
The positions can be short-term or permanent, but the main point is that the terms of "employment" are not fixed in any ordinary employment contract (raison d'état oblige...).
People in such positions can (and often do) then talk about having a "status". As opposed to the lowly assistants etc. who don't.

And I think this is the meaning here.


Christopher RH
Local time: 16:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 106
Grading comment
Perfect, thanks a million.
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
specific legal status


Explanation:
I think you are right, and that the French has both senses--status and the instrument from which it flows. I'm not sure that it's possible to capture both senses in one term in English. You could either go for "specific legal status" or perhaps "specific regulation". I doubt that a law is actually involved, though I'm not certain. Someone else may know better. I also checked on the legal glossary of the University of Ottawa but as you've probably already seen, that's not a huge help here. FWIW, I've pasted in the entry on status below.

statut
status (of a bankrupt) L.R., c. B-1.01; 160(c)
status (of a citizen) L.R., c. C-29; 32(1)
status (of a diplomatic agent) L.R., c. F-29.4; ann. I, préambule
avoir rang et statut
have the rank and status/to (of a deputy minister) L.R., c. C-12.8; 13(1)
avoir un rang ou un statut supérieur
have rank or status senior/to (to all other judges) L.R., c. J-1; 41(4) "juge en chef"
égalité du statut
equality of status (of the official languages) L.R., c. N-4; 10(1)(b)
favoriser la progression vers l'égalité de statut et d'usage
advance the equality of status and use/to (of English and French in Canada) L.R., c. O-3.01; 2(b)
rang et statut
rank and standing (of deputy head) L.R., c. P-33; 3(5)





    Reference: http://www.uottawa.ca/associations/ctdj/lexfed_f.htm
Sarah Walls
Australia
Local time: 00:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12
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