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celui-ci (this context)

English translation: his replacement

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16:03 Mar 8, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s)
French term or phrase: celui-ci (this context)
Dans l?éventualité où l?Investigateur quitte le centre hospitalier, ou se trouve autrement dans l?incapacité d?effectuer la Recherche, le prestataire doit nommer un remplaçant, sous réserve de l?autorisation préalable écrite du promoteur; celui-ci sera considéré par la suite aux fins du présent Contrat comme étant l?Investigateur.

In this sentence, logically celui-ci seems to indicate "le remplaçant." However, grammatically it would seem to mean "le promoteur." Or does the pronoun not refer back to le promoteur because it is in a phrase after an apostrophe? I would appreciate any clarification of this.
Jeanne Zang
United States
Local time: 08:37
English translation:his replacement
Explanation:
It is generally risky to translate "celui-ci" or "ce dernier" by "the latter" or something similar, for one thing because it's often bad English and for another because the French are a little sloppy with their antecedents. A much safer way to deal with this and similar situations is to use the term referred to (here obviously the replacing party) even if it sounds a bit redundant (repetition is no sin in legal copy; vagueness is).
Selected response from:

lenkl
Local time: 14:37
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4his replacement
lenkl
5This oneJuan Fern�ndez
2 +2the latter
Jonathan MacKerron


  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
This one


Explanation:
the pronoun is refering to "un remplaçant". The reasoning behind this is the punctuation and the fact that the sentence continues with "sera considéré par la suite" = will/shall be considered by the latter....

Juan Fern�ndez
Local time: 07:37
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Jonathan MacKerron: "this one" is seldom used to refer to a person
4 mins
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1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
the latter


Explanation:
might work

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 mins (2004-03-08 16:06:12 GMT)
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the person in question

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Note added at 19 mins (2004-03-08 16:22:56 GMT)
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\"this person\" referring to the replacement is IMO the best option

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 25

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Brigith Guimarães
46 mins

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
58 mins

neutral  lenkl: except that, leaving the sentence as it now reads, "the latter" would refer to "le promoteur" and not to "un remplaçant"
1 hr
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
his replacement


Explanation:
It is generally risky to translate "celui-ci" or "ce dernier" by "the latter" or something similar, for one thing because it's often bad English and for another because the French are a little sloppy with their antecedents. A much safer way to deal with this and similar situations is to use the term referred to (here obviously the replacing party) even if it sounds a bit redundant (repetition is no sin in legal copy; vagueness is).


lenkl
Local time: 14:37
Specializes in field
PRO pts in category: 67
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: Sloppy they certainly are.
51 mins
  -> Oui mais on mange bien ici, au moins...

agree  Simon Mountifield: I would also be inclined to use a repetition, maybe adding "the said replacement"...
52 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  writeaway: said replacement-standard procedure
1 hr
  -> "said replacement" (or "the said replacement" in the UK) would fit nicely here if formal legal language is used; the trend is toward plain English, however.

agree  Charlie Bavington: or you could stick the "sous reserve..." clause after the rest of it, to keep it tidy and possibly easier to understand (if, say, the target includes non EMT folk).
12 hrs
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