KudoZ home » French to English » Law (general)

déposer/enregistrer une marque

English translation: file/register a (trade)mark

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:déposer/enregistrer une marque
English translation:file/register a (trade)mark
Entered by: Timothy Barton
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

22:05 Jul 18, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general) / trademarks
French term or phrase: déposer/enregistrer une marque
Any glossaries and translations I looked up said "register(ered)" for both French words. And indeed, a registered trademark is a "marque déposée". Then I came across the following sentence:

"Selon les documents produits, son dirigeant [de l'entreprise] a déposé auprés de I'OMPI avec revendication pour la France la marque C1... le 31 mai 1983 en classes 5, 29, 30 et 32 , la marque C2... le 11 avril 1992 en classe 30 pour des produits de confiserie; la société B.... justifie du dépót le 6 mars 1997 enregistré le 14 avril 1998 de la marque communautaire C3.... en classes 28 et 30 pour des produits et services de confiseríe et de jeux et jouets"

So C3 was "déposé" in 1997 and "enregistré" in 1998. So it is clearly not the same thing.

I also came across the following on a website: "STATUT état de la marque : déposée, publiée, enregistrée ou renouvelée - le statut évolue avec la vie de la marque"

After much searching, I found a translated text referring to the different stages:

"(2) Toutefois, une marque déposée par un ressortissant d’un pays de l’Union dans un quelconque des pays de l’Union ne pourra être refusée ou invalidée pour le motif qu’elle n’aura pas été déposée, enregistrée ou renouvelée au pays d’origine."

"(2) However, an application for the registration of a mark filed by a national of a country of the Union in any country of the Union may not be refused, nor may a registration be invalidated, on the ground that filing, registration, or renewal, has not been effected in the country of origin."

So, according to this, déposée is "filed". But "marque déposée" is virtually infinitely more common than "filed trademark".

Do I go back and change everywhere where I had "déposée" to "filed"?

Here are some other examples from the text (excuse spelling errors due to using OCR software):

"il est sollicité [...] que soit pronencée la déchéance des droits de D.... sur la marque C... déposée le 2 avril 1993 en application des dispositions de I'article L 714-5 du code, de la propriété lntellectuelle"

il est sollicité [...]

· la nullité de la marque C1 déposée le 6 mars 1997 par B... ;
· la nullité des marques C2 enregistrée le 17 juillet 1996, C3 enregistrée le 24 juillet 1998, C4 enregistrée le 14 janvier 2000, C5 enregistrée le 6 juin 1997 par la société B...;

(Note the switch of word between the two items in the list. If the two words meant the same thing, would they not be listed together?).

Sorry for the long winded explanation, but think it was needed here.
Timothy Barton
Local time: 10:08
file/register a trademark
Explanation:
I'm not a patent attorney but I do believe that the difference between the two is that you file for registration of a trademark and that it may then be registered. You can "file a trademark" just as you can "file a patent", but the trademark of patent office actually registers it. Or perhaps not exactly, but the two terms are file (déposer) and register (enregistrer).

"Under U.S. trademark law, the R-in-a-circle symbol (®) may only be used in connection with a mark if that mark is a federally registered trademark. By "federally registered" we mean that the trademark owner has not only filed a trademark registration application with the US Patent & Trademark Office, but has been granted a registration. In contrast, the TM and SM symbols may be used freely without respect to whether or not there is a federal trademark registration. If you are offering goods or services, you may freely use the TM or SM symbol to denote trademarks or service marks that you use to indicate the origin of your goods or services."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 hrs 38 mins (2005-07-19 07:44:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don\'t think there is a need to belabor this point, but GdT - for which I am grateful but which I use cautiously - doesn\'t seem to reflect Canadian usage (which may be considered too Franglais over there), as documented by many Google examples, such as:

AER - Avocat/Agent de marques de commerce - François W. Légaré
Qui peut enregistrer une marque de commerce? Pendant combien de temps un enregistrement reste-il en vigueur? Comment enregistrer une marque de commerce? ...
www.novacom.qc.ca/aer/fwl_faq.html
Selected response from:

lenkl
Local time: 11:08
Grading comment
Thanks guys. There is a similar problem with marque/marque de fabrique and mark/trademark. I may be back if I don't manage to convince myself from my own research that I'm fine translating "marque" as "trademark".
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +11file/register a trademark
lenkl
5enregistred/patent pending then patented
eltrex
4register a trademark
DocteurPC


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
déposer/enregistrer une marque
register a trademark


Explanation:
see GDT

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2005-07-18 22:23:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

after reading your very long explanation
filing and registering a trademark -
filing comes first
and then it\'s registered


    Reference: http://granddictionnaire.com
DocteurPC
Canada
Local time: 05:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 61
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
déposer/enregistrer une marque
enregistred/patent pending then patented


Explanation:
A product is first enregistred, then after an investigation as taken place to asure the legality of the claim, a patent is granted.The process may take-up to 2 years.

eltrex
France
Local time: 11:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: enregistered is Frenglish. imho, your confidence level is too high.
56 mins

neutral  xxxdf49f: enregistered? 100% sure of that???
11 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +11
déposer/enregistrer une marque
file/register a trademark


Explanation:
I'm not a patent attorney but I do believe that the difference between the two is that you file for registration of a trademark and that it may then be registered. You can "file a trademark" just as you can "file a patent", but the trademark of patent office actually registers it. Or perhaps not exactly, but the two terms are file (déposer) and register (enregistrer).

"Under U.S. trademark law, the R-in-a-circle symbol (®) may only be used in connection with a mark if that mark is a federally registered trademark. By "federally registered" we mean that the trademark owner has not only filed a trademark registration application with the US Patent & Trademark Office, but has been granted a registration. In contrast, the TM and SM symbols may be used freely without respect to whether or not there is a federal trademark registration. If you are offering goods or services, you may freely use the TM or SM symbol to denote trademarks or service marks that you use to indicate the origin of your goods or services."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 hrs 38 mins (2005-07-19 07:44:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don\'t think there is a need to belabor this point, but GdT - for which I am grateful but which I use cautiously - doesn\'t seem to reflect Canadian usage (which may be considered too Franglais over there), as documented by many Google examples, such as:

AER - Avocat/Agent de marques de commerce - François W. Légaré
Qui peut enregistrer une marque de commerce? Pendant combien de temps un enregistrement reste-il en vigueur? Comment enregistrer une marque de commerce? ...
www.novacom.qc.ca/aer/fwl_faq.html


    Reference: http://www.patents.com/trademar.htm
lenkl
Local time: 11:08
Works in field
PRO pts in category: 100
Grading comment
Thanks guys. There is a similar problem with marque/marque de fabrique and mark/trademark. I may be back if I don't manage to convince myself from my own research that I'm fine translating "marque" as "trademark".

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RHELLER: register a trademark www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/doc/general/whatis.htm
17 mins

agree  Béatrice Sylvie Lajoie: you file for patent recognition and then, if approved, it is registered
29 mins

agree  gad: exactly
30 mins

agree  xxxACOZ
2 hrs

agree  sktrans
2 hrs

agree  chinesetrans
3 hrs

agree  Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
3 hrs

agree  sporran
4 hrs

agree  Sarah Walls: Lenkl's explanation seems absolutely correct. But it may be that marque déposée is a term often loosely used, i.e. in general the English equivalent is prob. registered trademark, but in contexts where both terms are used, you translate accordingly.
8 hrs
  -> Good point.

agree  xxxdf49f: file and register, yes
11 hrs

agree  xxxsarahl
20 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search