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loyer (principal)

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14:45 Aug 10, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general) / lease
French term or phrase: loyer (principal)
I'm confused by the following section in the lease on the allocation by the lessor of amounts received from the lessee.
"Toute somme reçue par le BAILLEUR fera l'objet d'une imputation en premier lieu sur les charges, les impôts et les taxes, puis sur le loyer, enfin sur le loyer principal dans l'ordre chronologique des factures."

What is the difference here between the loyer and the loyer principal?
algy
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:51
English translation:see comment
Explanation:
I'm fairly sure that the 'loyer principal' corresponds to a concept of a 'core rent' (this is not a term that is actually used, as far as I know, I am using it to explain the concept only), while the 'loyer' means the "core" rent + other elements that the tenant will have to pay every month. Although I have to admit that I fail to see exactly how this works in this particular example, as 'charges, impôts et taxes' are listed separately anyway, and I can't see what else they might be adding to the 'loyer principal' OTHER than these elements that would constitute the 'loyer'.

However, to give a simple example, I recently rented for a year in France, and my 'loyer principal' was €1,129, plus €20 charges. The sum of €1,149 was what I had to pay every month without fail. Then there were other periodic charges (contribution to bin collection, taxe d'habitation, etc). But for the calculation of certain other payments (e.g. the estate agent's fee), it was always the 'loyer principal' (i.e. the €1,129 alone) which was taken into consideration.

In your context, it's saying that when the tenant pays any money towards the rent, it will always be put towards, in order: (1) the charges, impôts et taxes (2) the loyer (??) (3) the loyer principal. So if the tenant has any arrears in the payment of the additional charges and expenses, any rent payments will go towards paying off these arrears FIRST, rather than towards the actual rent (leaving the poor old tenant in arrears with his rent, too!)

This may not help you see the difference between 'loyer principal' and 'loyer' on its own, but I hope you find it a bit helpful anyway.
Selected response from:

Charlotte Allen
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:51
Grading comment
Thanks Charlotte. Apologies for the delay in grading. I was hoping for confirmation from the client but have heard nothing so far. I think you deserve points for the detailed suggestion, though!
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +1Could it be "base rent"Tia Scott
3 +1see comment
Charlotte Allen


  

Answers


26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
see comment


Explanation:
I'm fairly sure that the 'loyer principal' corresponds to a concept of a 'core rent' (this is not a term that is actually used, as far as I know, I am using it to explain the concept only), while the 'loyer' means the "core" rent + other elements that the tenant will have to pay every month. Although I have to admit that I fail to see exactly how this works in this particular example, as 'charges, impôts et taxes' are listed separately anyway, and I can't see what else they might be adding to the 'loyer principal' OTHER than these elements that would constitute the 'loyer'.

However, to give a simple example, I recently rented for a year in France, and my 'loyer principal' was €1,129, plus €20 charges. The sum of €1,149 was what I had to pay every month without fail. Then there were other periodic charges (contribution to bin collection, taxe d'habitation, etc). But for the calculation of certain other payments (e.g. the estate agent's fee), it was always the 'loyer principal' (i.e. the €1,129 alone) which was taken into consideration.

In your context, it's saying that when the tenant pays any money towards the rent, it will always be put towards, in order: (1) the charges, impôts et taxes (2) the loyer (??) (3) the loyer principal. So if the tenant has any arrears in the payment of the additional charges and expenses, any rent payments will go towards paying off these arrears FIRST, rather than towards the actual rent (leaving the poor old tenant in arrears with his rent, too!)

This may not help you see the difference between 'loyer principal' and 'loyer' on its own, but I hope you find it a bit helpful anyway.

Charlotte Allen
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:51
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 160
Grading comment
Thanks Charlotte. Apologies for the delay in grading. I was hoping for confirmation from the client but have heard nothing so far. I think you deserve points for the detailed suggestion, though!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Hi Charlotte Thanks for your suggestions. I'm still waiting to hear from the client and will grade as soon as possible.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: I suspect there has been an editing error and "puis sur le loyer" should be deleted. This covers the case where tenants do not systematically pay the total sum due each month - as with bankruptcy, etc. , there are priorities as to who gets money first
22 mins
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Could it be "base rent"


Explanation:
Base rent meaning the rent without charges, taxes, etc. and loyer being the rent with charges and taxes.

Tia Scott
Local time: 07:51
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 7

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Roberta Beyer
2274 days
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Changes made by editors
Aug 10, 2006 - Changes made by Sabine Trautewein:
Language pairGerman to English » French to English


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