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generalisation

English translation: rewrite

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19:57 Mar 4, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general)
French term or phrase: generalisation
Meaning to make something applicable to many. The English word generalization doesn't seem to me to be appropriate here.
emiledgar
Belgium
Local time: 22:03
English translation:rewrite
Explanation:
I feel the sentence would sound more natural in English if rewritten thus:
1539 Parish Registers rewritten and brought into general use

(or some variant of this)
Selected response from:

Marc Glinert
Local time: 22:03
Grading comment
Merci.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2generalization
Tony M
4 +2coming in to general use
AllegroTrans
3 +1rewriteMarc Glinert
3widespread inceptionAlain Pommet
3diversification
Katarina Peters


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
diversification


Explanation:
...something applicable to other things as well?

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Note added at 16 mins (2007-03-04 20:13:35 GMT)
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or maybe "commonalization" ? (if I'm inventing a new word, I apologize...)

Katarina Peters
Canada
Local time: 16:03
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in HungarianHungarian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 70

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Could be, but this is usually used in a rather different and fairly specific way... / I think you are, and I can't honestly say I like it!
4 mins
  -> check my second option!
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
widespread inception


Explanation:
I know it's not the same as general - but in France it generally takes a few years after a law is implemented for it to come into effect fully!

Alain Pommet
Local time: 22:03
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 113

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Yes, but I'm not sure tha 'inception' is really the right word here: "The action of entering upon some undertaking, process, or stage of existence; beginning, commencement." [NS OED]
13 hrs
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51 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
coming in to general use


Explanation:
It's about the year when Parish Registers came into use - I cannot think of a single English word, hence "coming into general use"

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Note added at 2 hrs (2007-03-04 22:40:49 GMT)
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I meant to type "into" (one word) not "in to"

AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:03
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 958

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  katsy: I see Tony's point but think this is the most appropriate in this context
13 mins

agree  Swatchka
29 mins

neutral  Tony M: Yes, except that it really isn't possible to 'shoehorn' 'coming into...' as a noun... idea is right, but really demands rephrasing.
14 hrs
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
rewrite


Explanation:
I feel the sentence would sound more natural in English if rewritten thus:
1539 Parish Registers rewritten and brought into general use

(or some variant of this)

Marc Glinert
Local time: 22:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 25
Grading comment
Merci.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, exactly! Sorry, Marc, I didn't see your answer before I posted my latest note
2 hrs
  -> thanks Tony - nice to hear from you
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
generalization


Explanation:
NS OED gives this as one of the definitions of the verb 'to generalize':

4 v.t. Bring into general use; make common, familiar, or generally known; spread or extend.

Although this is not the most common usage of the word, it IS quite standard, and would generally be understood by an EN reader of average intelligence.

However, as before, your failure to give any meaningful context means it is impossible to know whether this would work "here" — give us the sentence and the context in which you wish to use it, and we might be able to help a bit more!

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Note added at 19 mins (2007-03-04 20:16:54 GMT)
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'popularization' might be appropriate, if it is specifically referring to 'spreading into the general population'

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Note added at 22 mins (2007-03-04 20:19:56 GMT)
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Here's just one example gleaned from the Web at random:

JSTOR: Energy in the American Economy, 1850-1975. An Economic ...

The generalization of the use of power in the form of electricity has been a major factor in the increased effectiveness of the use of energy throughout the ...

links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-0507(196109)21%3A3%3C418%3AEITAE1%3E2.0.CO%3B2-Z -


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Note added at 47 mins (2007-03-04 20:44:50 GMT)
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In the light of your new contetx, I think 'generalization' is fine here.

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Note added at 14 hrs (2007-03-05 10:51:04 GMT)
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In fact, I think what is wrong here is trying to stick to closely to the original FR structure, which wouldn't be the most natural way to express it in EN. As so very often, EN would more likely use a verbal form where FR uses a nominal form.

For example:

1539: parish registers were revised and their use became more widespread

Tony M
France
Local time: 22:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 239

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Katarina Peters: I like popularization
4 mins
  -> Thanks, Katarina! That would be my favourite, AS LONG AS it is applicable in the specific context... (which sadly from the added context we now know it isn't!)

neutral  xxxCMJ_Trans: surely "generalisation" has another meaning in English - people make generalisations..... wouldn't you say "general extension of the principle of something?" (also "popularisation" surely means to make something popular) Heaven help the English language!
22 mins
  -> 'to generalize' has several possible meanings, this one is quite widespread; 'popularization' does not ONLY mean 'to make popular', just as 'popular art' doesn't mean 'art that is popular', but 'art of the people'

agree  narasimha: Better to retain as it is.
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Narasimha!
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