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le(s) premier(s) conseiller(s) (HERE)

English translation: the first councillor(s)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:le(s) premier(s) conseiller(s) (HERE)
English translation:the first councillor(s)
Entered by: Catherine Gorton
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21:40 Apr 25, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general) / Ruling of the Administrative Court of Nice
French term or phrase: le(s) premier(s) conseiller(s) (HERE)
Hi everyone, I need help regarding the translation of "le(s) premier(s) conseiller(s)". This appears at the end of a ruling by the Administrative Court of Nice. The two persons in question are both the "premiers conseillers": are they senior members of the Court or something like that?

Firstly, here is the text I have to translate:
Delibere apres l'audience du 4 decembre 2007, a laquelle siegeaient:

M. P., president-rapporteur
M. S. et Mme G., **** premiers conseillers ****

Lu en audience publique le 8 janvier 2008


Le president-rapporteur
A. P.

Le **** premier conseiller ****
Assesseur le plus ancien
D.S.
(end of text)

I found on the web this document regarding those two people who are now both members of the Administrative Court of Nice.

"Arrêté du 10 décembre 1999 portant affectation (tribunaux administratifs et cours administratives d'appel)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Par arrêté du vice-président du Conseil d'Etat en date du 10 décembre 1999, les **** premiers conseillers **** et les conseillers du corps des tribunaux administratifs et des cours administratives d'appel dont les noms suivent sont affectés dans les tribunaux administratifs ci-après à compter du 1er janvier 2000 :
...
Mme G. (A.), au tribunal administratif de Nice ;
...
M. S. (D.), aux tribunaux administratifs de Basse-Terre, Cayenne, Fort-de-France, Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon, en résidence à Cayenne ;"
Catherine Gorton
Local time: 12:59
the first counsellors
Explanation:
I'm pretty sure this is right
Selected response from:

xxxBunsen
Local time: 05:59
Grading comment
Hi everyone, I had problems to decide among the 3 answers... First class auditors seems to be used only for the Council of State (according to my research on the web). A friend of mine specialist in French public law actually found the answer on the web: first councillors. Check this out: "The single body of the administrative courts and administrative courts of
appeal incorporates three grades: councillor, first councillor, president.
Hierarchical advancement is achieved by seniority, except for access to the
three last levels of the president’s grade, which is made by selection, and
after registration on an annual roster of eligibility, established by
proposition from the Higher Council of the Administrative Courts and
Administrative Courts of Appeal. Grade promotion is made by selection through
registration on the list of officers slated for promotion, which is established
by proposition from the Higher Council of Administrative Courts and
Administrative Courts of Appeal."
This text is available in French and in English on the following website: http://www.juradmin.eu/en/eurtour/eurtour_en.lasso?page=detail&countryid=10

I am ashamed to have to say that although I had come accross this website long time ago I had forgotten about it... I will keep it in my favourites now. Thanks to all of you for your answers!!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4first class auditors
AllegroTrans
3the first counsellorsxxxBunsen
3first counsel(s)
schevallier


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
first counsel(s)


Explanation:
IMO

schevallier
Local time: 13:59
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
le(s) premier(s) conseiller(s)
first class auditors


Explanation:
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the present-day French institution. For institutions with the same name during the Ancien Régime in France, see Conseil du Roi. For other uses, see the disambiguation page Council of State.
In France, the Conseil d'État (English: Council of State) is an organ of the French national government. Its functions include assisting the executive with legal advice and being the supreme court for administrative justice. Its members are (for the most part) high level jurists.


[Organisation
The presidency of the Conseil d'État is held by the vice-president. The general assembly of the Council of State may be presided by the prime minister, or, in his absence, the justice minister.[1] The vice-president of the Conseil is considered, for ceremonial purposes, the foremost civil servant in France. The current vice-president is Jean-Marc Sauvé.
Other members of the Council include, by decreasing rank:
presidents of sections;
councillors in ordinary service;
councillors in extraordinary service;
masters of requests;
first class auditors;
second class auditors.
The vice-president is appointed by decree in the council of ministers on the proposition of the Minister of justice; he or she is chosen among the presidents of sections of the Council, or councillors in ordinary service.[2] The presidents of sections are appointed by decree in the council of ministers on the proposition of the Minister of justice, and chosen from the councillors in ordinary service.[3]
Councillors in ordinary service, masters of requests and first class auditors are appointed in majority from the rank immediately inferior.[4] Appointees from outside the Council may be judges from administrative courts [5] or may come from other bodies[6]. Second class auditors are named among the graduates of the École nationale d'administration.[7]

The Conseil is seated in the Palais Royal in Paris.
The Conseil is divided into 6 sections:
The litigation section (section du contentieux) — see below.
The section of the report and studies (section du rapport et des études) writes the annual report, conducts studies and helps in ensuring the proper execution of litigation decisions.
The finance section (section des finances), interior section (section de l'intérieur), social section (section sociale), public works section (section des travaux publics) reviews all ordinances, all statute projects drafted by the Council of Ministers as well as all decrees for which that review is compulsory (décrets en Conseil d'État). Such reviews are nonbinding, but they are compulsory.
The Conseil d'État may also review legal problems addressed to it by the Ministers.[8] It is also charged with the inspection of administrative courts.[9]
History
The origins of the Conseil d'État go back to the 13th Century, where it appears under various names, sometimes as "Conseil privé" or "Conseil des parties" ("Privy Counsel") and sometimes as "Conseil d'État". It brought together lawyers (legists was probably a more accurate term) to provide counsel to the king with respect to law suits. Officially instituted in 1557, this was the largest of the royal counsels (see Conseil du Roi), composed of the chancellor, the dukes with peerage, the ministers and secretaries of state, the contrôleur général des finances, the 30 counsellors of state, the 80 maître des requêtes and the intendants of finance.
The kings, who held the capacity to dispense justice and render judgments as the court of last resort, let that power be exercised by courts and parlements. But the king still retained the power to override them at will. In particular, the kings continued to decide great issues and to make decisions when the acts of their administration were disputed. The decisions of the king’s Conseil d'État were regarded as being issued under “restrained justice” (that is the self-restraint of the sovereign). The legists also assisted the king in the development of new laws in addition to their exercise of “restrained justice”.
The current Conseil d'État was created under the Consulate in 1799 as a judicial authority responsible for lawsuits against the State and charged with helping in the drafting of the most important legislation. The First Consul (later Emperor) presided over its sessions, and the Council performed many of the functions of a Cabinet. After the Bourbon Restoration, the Council was retained as an administrative court but without its former prominence.
Its role was better defined by the law of 1872.
[Litigation
The Conseil for the system of administrative justice. It hears both recourses against decrees and other executive decisions from the President of the Republic and the cabinet ministers, as well as appellate cases from lower administrative courts. Its decisions are final.
While the Conseil is strictly speaking not a court, it functions much like one with respect to litigation. Plaintiffs are represented by lawyers drawn from the same exclusive bar as the Court of Cassation.
First instance litigation
The Conseil hears cases against decisions of the national government (decrees, regulations issued by ministers, decisions by committees with a national competency) as well as recourses pertaining to regional elections.
The Conseil d'État examines the conformance of regulations and administrative decisions with respect to the Constitution, higher administrative decisions, the general principles of Law, statute law, international traties and conventions. The general principles of law are principles that are not found in any statute but derive from the spirit of the body of law; they are discovered by the Conseil and thus made into case law.
The Conseil has full latitude to judge on the legality of any decision from the executive branch, except for the very narrow category of "acts of government" where it judges itself incompetent. The Conseil itself has judged that such acts are restricted to:
relationships between the executive branch and the legislative branch (whether to submit a law project to parliament...)
acts that cannot be separated from the foreign policy of France.
See the analysis on the Conseil's site for more information (in French).
As such, the Conseil acts as a powerful check on the actions of the executive.
Appellate jurisdiction
The Conseil is the appellate jurisdiction for decisions of administrative courts (the 37 tribunaux administratifs) regarding local elections.
It is the cassation jurisdiction for decisions by administrative courts of appeal (the 8 cours administratives d'appel), meaning that it hears cases in which the plaintiff argues that the court of appeal ignored or misinterpreted law.
Procedure
The procedure is inquisitorial: the litigant writes a letter to the Conseil, stating precisely what happened and why he feels that the defendant acted illegally; the Conseil then starts an inquiry, asking the other party (generally, a government or government agency) for precisions, and so on until the Conseil has a clear picture of the case. The litigant does not have the burden of proof: the Conseil may well decide that the litigant was right and the government was wrong if the information supplied by the litigant was sufficient to enable it to find the missing proofs. Of course, both parties may supply supplemental information until the case is ready for final judgment.
In some cases, it is unclear whether a case should be heard before administrative courts or judiciary courts. In this case, the tribunal des conflits, made of equal number of members of the Conseil d'État and of judges from the Court of Cassation and presided by the Minister of Justice is summoned.
Main Decisions of the Conseil d'État
As it renders final judicial review over almost all acts of the executive branch, the decisions of the Conseil d'État may be of considerable importance, often not for the actual case judged, but for the implications on the interpretation of law. While France is a civil law country and there is no formal rule of stare decisis, lower courts follow the jurisprudence constante of the Conseil d'État. The major decisions of the Conseil d'État are collected into books and commented by academics; the official site of the Conseil carries a list of comments on important decisions. The interpretation of points of law forms the Conseil's doctrine.
The decisions are named after the individual(s) or body who has appealed to the Council. The name of male individual used to be preced by Sieur, the name of female individuals by Dame or Demoiselle and the name of widows called by their husband's name Dame veuve.


AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:59
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 958
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
the first counsellors


Explanation:
I'm pretty sure this is right

xxxBunsen
Local time: 05:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Hi everyone, I had problems to decide among the 3 answers... First class auditors seems to be used only for the Council of State (according to my research on the web). A friend of mine specialist in French public law actually found the answer on the web: first councillors. Check this out: "The single body of the administrative courts and administrative courts of
appeal incorporates three grades: councillor, first councillor, president.
Hierarchical advancement is achieved by seniority, except for access to the
three last levels of the president’s grade, which is made by selection, and
after registration on an annual roster of eligibility, established by
proposition from the Higher Council of the Administrative Courts and
Administrative Courts of Appeal. Grade promotion is made by selection through
registration on the list of officers slated for promotion, which is established
by proposition from the Higher Council of Administrative Courts and
Administrative Courts of Appeal."
This text is available in French and in English on the following website: http://www.juradmin.eu/en/eurtour/eurtour_en.lasso?page=detail&countryid=10

I am ashamed to have to say that although I had come accross this website long time ago I had forgotten about it... I will keep it in my favourites now. Thanks to all of you for your answers!!!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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