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S’entendre dire

English translation: Plaintiff moves the Court to; Plaintiff seeks the following relief:

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:S’entendre dire
English translation:Plaintiff moves the Court to; Plaintiff seeks the following relief:
Entered by: silviantonia
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03:32 Feb 22, 2009
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general)
French term or phrase: S’entendre dire
S’entendre dire préalablement que la présente cause n'appelle que des débats succincts au sens de l'article 735 du Code Judiciaire et qu'elle sera par conséquent retenue à l'audience d'introduction.

I understand that the petitioner is seeking for the court to state (or hold) that the matter will be held for a hearing, but I can't seem to find a way to say this...
silviantonia
United States
Local time: 09:02
Comes now the plaintiff and moves the Court to find that
Explanation:
Here's my two cents:

It means "to move the Court to find that".
So, within the context, using the official petitioning terms, it should be translated as "Comes now the plaintiff and moves the Court to find that..." Or to "determine, adjudicate, adjudge, decree that".

It's a French legal term which states the scope and purpose of a petition. Also used, from what I have seen, in American petitions is "to request the Court to" or "ask the Court", but that is more informal. "To move" is the term which appears on official Court petitions, in the USA.

See the links below for confirmation and also these:

http://www.almb.uscourts.gov/adminorders/2002/01-02195_Conde...
www.bradleyarant.com/publications_opinions.php?ID=5228
http://www.google.ro/search?hl=ro&q="moves the court to"&sta...
http://www.google.ro/search?hl=ro&q="moves the court to"&sta...
http://www.wordreference.com/fren/s'entendre


I hope this helped.
Selected response from:

Midland Productions
Romania
Local time: 19:02
Grading comment
I went with something similar to this, although not as formal; I never did like federal pleading, because I came into my own as a lawyer when the State of New Jersey passed something called 'plain language,' and I am an advocate of that... but your answer set me on the right path. Thank you very much!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4Comes now the plaintiff and moves the Court to find that
Midland Productions


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Comes now the plaintiff and moves the Court to find that


Explanation:
Here's my two cents:

It means "to move the Court to find that".
So, within the context, using the official petitioning terms, it should be translated as "Comes now the plaintiff and moves the Court to find that..." Or to "determine, adjudicate, adjudge, decree that".

It's a French legal term which states the scope and purpose of a petition. Also used, from what I have seen, in American petitions is "to request the Court to" or "ask the Court", but that is more informal. "To move" is the term which appears on official Court petitions, in the USA.

See the links below for confirmation and also these:

http://www.almb.uscourts.gov/adminorders/2002/01-02195_Conde...
www.bradleyarant.com/publications_opinions.php?ID=5228
http://www.google.ro/search?hl=ro&q="moves the court to"&sta...
http://www.google.ro/search?hl=ro&q="moves the court to"&sta...
http://www.wordreference.com/fren/s'entendre


I hope this helped.

Example sentence(s):
  • http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=391989
  • http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=963553
Midland Productions
Romania
Local time: 19:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Romanian
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
I went with something similar to this, although not as formal; I never did like federal pleading, because I came into my own as a lawyer when the State of New Jersey passed something called 'plain language,' and I am an advocate of that... but your answer set me on the right path. Thank you very much!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Actually, that is common terminology for US Federal Courts, which is more formal. And it is not a bad suggestion at all, thank you.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: boilerplate legalese in both En and Fr. fwiw, with 'Or to "determine, adjudicate, adjudge, decree that" ' is misleading because English isn't quite the free for all you seem to think it is. The terms aren't necessarily interchangeable
3 hrs
  -> In this case they are, as a quick search may indicate. They are all court actions with the meaning of "establishing, finding". And, sometimes, the court's adjudication bears the formula "orders, adjudges and decrees". Either will do.
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Changes made by editors
Feb 26, 2009 - Changes made by silviantonia:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term
Feb 22, 2009 - Changes made by writeaway:
Field (specific)Law: Contract(s) » Law (general)


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