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dire récapitulatif

English translation: summary

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:récapitulatif
English translation:summary
Entered by: Tom Bishop
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13:32 Apr 6, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general) / document sent to an expert regarding a case
French term or phrase: dire récapitulatif
In a letter from a lawyer to an expert:

"Monsieur l'Expert,

Conformément à votre demande, la Société XXXXXXX a établi le présent récapitulatif, récapitulant et complétant les précédents dires auxquels il devra être joint."

It's not the expert's report but rather looks like it's some sort of summary statement made by the claimant with questions to the expert regarding the case...and would the letter start with "Dear Sir"? "Mr. Expert" sounds pretty wierd to me... Summary statement just doesn't sound very specific to me.
Meri Buettner
France
Local time: 00:46
summary
Explanation:
Tout simplement! :-)

And simply "Dear Sir,"
Selected response from:

Tom Bishop
Local time: 23:46
Grading comment
Special thanks to all...went with "summary" as I don't think it's a very "official" document (except that it gets attached to the other summaries submitted to the expert by the other parties - guess it helps him/her write up the final report "contradictoirement")...and no, I did not have the expert's name so had to go with Dear Sir :o)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2summary
Tom Bishop
4 +2Summing up
Mike Osman
5summary statement, which again states and adds to the previous statementsJane Lamb-Ruiz
4Skeleton/ short-form statement (civ.)/Short -form proof of evidence (crim.)xxxKirstyMacC
2Summary of the Claim
Robert Frankling
2outline
Peter Freckleton


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
dire récapitulatif
Summing up


Explanation:
I think that yes "summary statement" wouldn't be right for me either.

It should start as "Dear Sir".

Mike Osman
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:46
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SomaliSomali

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
5 mins

agree  Hacene: In french, the text is correct, a literal translation doesn't work but your sugeestion would, specially if the first sentence is translated
56 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Skeleton/ short-form statement (civ.)/Short -form proof of evidence (crim.)


Explanation:
Summing-up is what a judge does for a jury at the end of a copurt case.

I'll assume this is a civil case, though not spelt out. In BE, skeleton (i.e. summarised) arguments and pleadings on diskette are what lazy UK judges are now clamouring for.

In a crim. case, proof of evidence is not a tautology. Witnesses and experts are 'proofed for evidence'.

'... teaching” “<your child> needs speech and language therapy” Pages 40-42 at the back of the Code of Practice show how a *skeleton Statement* should be set out ... '



    Reference: http://www.afasic.org.uk/pdf/Proposed%20Statement.pdf
xxxKirstyMacC
Local time: 23:46
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 213
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
dire récapitulatif
summary statement, which again states and adds to the previous statements


Explanation:
Dear Mr. [Smith],

Don't you have the guy's name?? Forget using expert in English...it's nonsense...


which restates and adds to

seems pretty straightforward to me



Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 610
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
récapitulatif
summary


Explanation:
Tout simplement! :-)

And simply "Dear Sir,"

Tom Bishop
Local time: 23:46
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32
Grading comment
Special thanks to all...went with "summary" as I don't think it's a very "official" document (except that it gets attached to the other summaries submitted to the expert by the other parties - guess it helps him/her write up the final report "contradictoirement")...and no, I did not have the expert's name so had to go with Dear Sir :o)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: not dear sir if you have the person's name in English. That is rude. Dear Sir is for some kind of form letter
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Jane. Re "Dear Sir", at the risk of raising the old US/UK ... ;-) It might depend on whether you wish to retain the original register.

agree  Graham macLachlan: dire = statement
4 hrs
  -> Thanks Graham
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
outline


Explanation:
Covers some ground - could be a case outline, an outline of evidence, etc., depending on context.

Peter Freckleton
Australia
Local time: 08:46
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 59
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
dire récapitulatif
Summary of the Claim


Explanation:
I may as well try as well..."dire" can also mean "a claim".

Robert Frankling
Local time: 17:46
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 120
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