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Les associés font apport a la société, SAVOIR:

English translation: à savoir

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00:49 Dec 9, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general)
French term or phrase: Les associés font apport a la société, SAVOIR:
This is from some articles of association and is a sub-heading from the section dealing with the breakdown of share capital. What does the 'savoir' mean in legal contexts? It comes up a few times in this document and I've never seen it before. Thanks in advance!
xxxBlurbfly
Local time: 09:26
English translation:à savoir
Explanation:
i.e., namely, that is to say

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Note added at 9 mins (2004-12-09 00:58:41 GMT)
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Or nothing at all (end the phrase with colon).
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 10:26
Grading comment
Bourth, thanks very much. Sorry for the delay.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6à savoirxxxBourth
5 +2TO WIT
Patrice


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
Les associés font apport a la société, SAVOIR:
à savoir


Explanation:
i.e., namely, that is to say

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 mins (2004-12-09 00:58:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or nothing at all (end the phrase with colon).

xxxBourth
Local time: 10:26
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 254
Grading comment
Bourth, thanks very much. Sorry for the delay.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Trada inc.
8 mins

agree  Richard Benham: Also (archaic) "to wit" or (abbreviation) "viz". I kind of like "to wit"--comes from an old verb meaning to know; so it's a literal translation.
11 mins
  -> To wit, or to woo, that is the question.

agree  Sarah Walls: Yes, like Richard, I quite like "to wit", though sometimes you wonder if it's just that kind of verbal padding that really doesn't add a great deal to the sentence and is better left out in English!
21 mins

agree  DocteurPC: to wit in legal documents is used instead of : the following items or similar terminology
28 mins

agree  Assimina Vavoula
5 hrs

agree  VRN
7 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Les associés font apport a la société, SAVOIR:
TO WIT


Explanation:
this is standard in legal documents

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Note added at 1 hr 16 mins (2004-12-09 02:06:38 GMT)
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I answered this before seeing the comments above, so I see \"to wit\" has already been discussed!...However that doesn\'t change my answer.


Patrice
United States
Local time: 01:26
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 31

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: If the rest of document is couched in formal legalese, then this is the one I'd go for.
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Dusty.

agree  xxxKirstyMacC
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Counsel.
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